Conversion to American Law Watch

cameronmcgarry
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OK, basically this is all hypothetical at the moment but it is my plan!

I'm taking Law at Nottingham Law School (Yes Nottingham Trent for all you cynics) and have plans to go on to do Law in America.

I want to specialise in intellectual property law most probably at the moment and have done a fair bit of research into this.

I want to know if anyone really knows the following...

- Do I have to do my LPC here, then go to an American Law School and take my LLM, for which do I also need to attain a firsts degree in England just to be considered?

- I understand that each state has its own rules and laws, but say i wanted to go to California (which ultimately is my intended goal) do i take say an LLM in intellectual property Law at say Berkeley, and then just enter for the Bar?

ANY help on answering my cunondrum of the day would be extremely appreciated
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Kettensägenmassaker
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I don't know of anyone who's passed the bar without completing their JD. Most students in the US go straight into a 3 year doctoral program. In fact, I'd never even heard of an LLM 'til I started really digging around in grad school stuff. It's not that common.
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Ethereal
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(Original post by Kettensägenmassaker)
I don't know of anyone who's passed the bar without completing their JD. Most students in the US go straight into a 3 year doctoral program. In fact, I'd never even heard of an LLM 'til I started really digging around in grad school stuff. It's not that common.
Your JD is equivalent to our LLB.
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Ethereal
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(Original post by cameronmcgarry)
OK, basically this is all hypothetical at the moment but it is my plan!

I'm taking Law at Nottingham Law School (Yes Nottingham Trent for all you cynics) and have plans to go on to do Law in America.

I want to specialise in intellectual property law most probably at the moment and have done a fair bit of research into this.

I want to know if anyone really knows the following...

- Do I have to do my LPC here, then go to an American Law School and take my LLM, for which do I also need to attain a firsts degree in England just to be considered?

- I understand that each state has its own rules and laws, but say i wanted to go to California (which ultimately is my intended goal) do i take say an LLM in intellectual property Law at say Berkeley, and then just enter for the Bar?

ANY help on answering my cunondrum of the day would be extremely appreciated
I don't think you need to do your LPC or qualify. BPP offer an american bar course (it isn't that long) and arrange for you to sit the exam.

Have a look at their website and email them specific questions.
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cameronmcgarry
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(Original post by Ethereal)
Your JD is equivalent to our LLB.
That is in fact another question that has presented itself, thank you for answering it!! I was wondering though, it seems to be that a JD is a Professional qualification, whereas the LLB is an academic one no?

Any more answers to the original questions would be much appreciated, thank you so far!
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cameronmcgarry
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(Original post by Ethereal)
I don't think you need to do your LPC or qualify. BPP offer an american bar course (it isn't that long) and arrange for you to sit the exam.

Have a look at their website and email them specific questions.
BPP is Holborn in London right?
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Ethereal
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(Original post by cameronmcgarry)
That is in fact another question that has presented itself, thank you for answering it!! I was wondering though, it seems to be that a JD is a Professional qualification, whereas the LLB is an academic one no?

Any more answers to the original questions would be much appreciated, thank you so far!
As I understand it the Americans sit the JD then sit their bar exam. The JD qualifies them to sit the bar exam much as our LLB qualifies us to sit the LPC/BVC (and then do the relevant training year(s) ). One of my lecturers at uni was American and said that in his opinion they could take a lot from our system in that they don't have any element of supervised practice.
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Ethereal
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(Original post by cameronmcgarry)
BPP is Holborn in London right?
They have places all over. Look at their website
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cameronmcgarry
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So no two or so years in Articles once your done!? So technically could be qualified in US before the UK - Sorry im not very educated on this subject, your help has been quite outstanding so far thank you!
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Ethereal
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(Original post by cameronmcgarry)
So no two or so years in Articles once your done!? So technically could be qualified in US before the UK - Sorry im not very educated on this subject, your help has been quite outstanding so far thank you!
Would take the same length of time but no supervised practice - americans do an undergrad then their JD.
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ScholarsInk
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(Original post by cameronmcgarry)
That is in fact another question that has presented itself, thank you for answering it!! I was wondering though, it seems to be that a JD is a Professional qualification, whereas the LLB is an academic one no?

Any more answers to the original questions would be much appreciated, thank you so far!
That (a professional qualification) it is, so one needs an undergraduate degree to do it.
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cameronmcgarry
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(Original post by ScholarsInk)
That (a professional qualification) it is, so one needs an undergraduate degree to do it.
So your understanding is that to become a lawyer in America (more specifically California) I would need to take my JD??
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Ethereal
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(Original post by ScholarsInk)
That (a professional qualification) it is, so one needs an undergraduate degree to do it.
It's a qualifying law degree (which isn't a professional qualification in the true sense of the word).
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cameronmcgarry
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What exactly DO I need then? Sorry getting a little tangled.

LLB + LLM?
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Ethereal
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http://www.centlaw.com/New%20York%20Bar
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cameronmcgarry
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California Bar - Open to UK Solicitors and Barristers

BINGO!!!!! Thank you ALOTTTTTTTT!
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Kettensägenmassaker
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(Original post by Ethereal)
Your JD is equivalent to our LLB.
Interesting. I guess you really do learn something everyday. I love it when I make myself appear useless in places I could've just avoided to begin with. /sarcasm

This thread has been very enlightening, though. I never imagined an entirely different system to qualify for law practice.
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Ethereal
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:p: New York open to holder of LLB (although not for all our unis)
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cameronmcgarry
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I'm sure i'd still need to take an LLM or soemthing just to getup to speed on US law... i would assume
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Ethereal
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(Original post by Kettensägenmassaker)
Interesting. I guess you really do learn something everyday. I love it when I make myself appear useless in places I could've just avoided to begin with.
It's just a difference in systems to be fair. Can't say I've ever understood why american bachelor degrees are so broad....
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