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Why are LNAT results delayed to much

Posting as parent:

They could actually release the results instantaneously and confirm in a week or so as is the case with so many other exams. So why does LNAT take so long to declare results?

Even if we assume, they do not want to release results before last day of application, so as to avoid leaks (not sure, if that is possible though). So why not release it the day after last day of application
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 1
As a student who took the LNAT in December 2022 (2023 entry hopefully :smile:), I was asking myself this question too.

The timing for results release is totally irrational when we consider it from a student's POV, because our LNAT score is important information to help us decide which "league" of universities to apply to. I was in tears over it for a couple of days due to the anxiety. I can only conclude that from the perspective of other stakeholders it makes sense, reasons being as follows.

1. A typical LNAT results email will not just include the individual candidate's MCQ results; it will also include the "average reportable (MCQ) score" for the cohort. Presumably, Pearson VUE needs to let the UCAS deadline lapse (so everyone has the chance to take the LNAT on time) and then take a couple more weeks to analyze this second data set in full. For example, the results email I saw on Reddit listed the individual's score as 24. This is an objectively not-fantastic score. However, the average cohort score for that year was apparently a 20. This means that the candidate got a score which was still better than average.

2. This helps put it in perspective for not just the candidates, but also the universities. Lots of online websites list the average score of successful applicants for Oxbridge, LSE, KCL, Bristol etc., but by no means are these the minimum acceptable LNAT score. This metric changes from year to year depending on the average performance of the cohort; for example, one of my friends got into LSE Law with an LNAT of 23/24 because the average in her year was a 19. So, universities need to access this information too and then make their decisions based on that, but again, only after the UCAS deadline has passed so that they're not making value judgments on a candidate too early (before the full picture of everyone who took the LNAT comes in).

TLDR: the wait is long but it's necessary in order to enable each candidate to be considered fairly in the context of their cohort. LNAT questions are randomized year-to-year and candidate-to-candidate so it's only reasonable that the difficulty would fluctuate as well.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by alilili
As a student who took the LNAT in December 2022 (2023 entry hopefully :smile:), I was asking myself this question too.

The timing for results release is totally irrational when we consider it from a student's POV, because our LNAT score is important information to help us decide which "league" of universities to apply to. I was in tears over it for a couple of days due to the anxiety. I can only conclude that from the perspective of other stakeholders it makes sense, reasons being as follows.

1. A typical LNAT results email will not just include the individual candidate's MCQ results; it will also include the "average reportable (MCQ) score" for the cohort. Presumably, Pearson VUE needs to let the UCAS deadline lapse (so everyone has the chance to take the LNAT on time) and then take a couple more weeks to analyze this second data set in full. For example, the results email I saw on Reddit listed the individual's score as 24. This is an objectively not-fantastic score. However, the average cohort score for that year was apparently a 20. This means that the candidate got a score which was still better than average.

2. This helps put it in perspective for not just the candidates, but also the universities. Lots of online websites list the average score of successful applicants for Oxbridge, LSE, KCL, Bristol etc., but by no means are these the minimum acceptable LNAT score. This metric changes from year to year depending on the average performance of the cohort; for example, one of my friends got into LSE Law with an LNAT of 23/24 because the average in her year was a 19. So, universities need to access this information too and then make their decisions based on that, but again, only after the UCAS deadline has passed so that they're not making value judgments on a candidate too early (before the full picture of everyone who took the LNAT comes in).

TLDR: the wait is long but it's necessary in order to enable each candidate to be considered fairly in the context of their cohort. LNAT questions are randomized year-to-year and candidate-to-candidate so it's only reasonable that the difficulty would fluctuate as well.


Interesting point. Given that they have different question sets, do you know if reporting is on for each set or for each year? Or do they actually adjust score in some way to adjust for relative difficulty between different sets. If it is later, then perhaps they cannot compute the score, let alone release them.
Other posts in TSR mention that the unis have score before the students get it. If that is the case, then, presumably LNAT can and should release the score caveated with whatever pending is to come in due course.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Sgcheam
Interesting point. Given that they have different question sets, do you know if reporting is on for each set or for each year? Or do they actually adjust score in some way to adjust for relative difficulty between different sets. If it is later, then perhaps they cannot compute the score, let alone release them.
Other posts in TSR mention that the unis have score before the students get it. If that is the case, then, presumably LNAT can and should release the score caveated with whatever pending is to come in due course.

Unis get A level results before the student does too ...
Reply 4
Original post by Sgcheam
Interesting point. Given that they have different question sets, do you know if reporting is on for each set or for each year? Or do they actually adjust score in some way to adjust for relative difficulty between different sets. If it is later, then perhaps they cannot compute the score, let alone release them.
Other posts in TSR mention that the unis have score before the students get it. If that is the case, then, presumably LNAT can and should release the score caveated with whatever pending is to come in due course.

I think as far as the official LNAT site states, there is no adjustment (unlike A Levels where your final score actually derives from the percentile you ended up in). I agree too that if universities have the information, students should have it. But since I can't do anything about it I just tell myself what I told you to cope :smile:

I did actually try a number of ways to get my LNAT results early (my lawyerly resourcefulness showing itself haha). I tried to email the admissions office at Bristol and Durham with a freedom of information equivalent request; per the Data Protection Act 2018 in the UK, an institution is legally obliged to disclose to you "personal information" which they hold about you, upon request. My reasoning was that although there is an MOU between Pearson VUE & participating universities that the latter will not disclose results privately before the official release, this statutory obligation should rightfully override that. The very simple way in which Bristol & Durham handled my request was to not respond, and that's honestly fine given that I have no official formal relationship with them yet. Maybe I can try again once my admissions counselor in school officially sends in my application and let you know?
Reply 5
Original post by alilili
I think as far as the official LNAT site states, there is no adjustment (unlike A Levels where your final score actually derives from the percentile you ended up in). I agree too that if universities have the information, students should have it. But since I can't do anything about it I just tell myself what I told you to cope :smile:

I did actually try a number of ways to get my LNAT results early (my lawyerly resourcefulness showing itself haha). I tried to email the admissions office at Bristol and Durham with a freedom of information equivalent request; per the Data Protection Act 2018 in the UK, an institution is legally obliged to disclose to you "personal information" which they hold about you, upon request. My reasoning was that although there is an MOU between Pearson VUE & participating universities that the latter will not disclose results privately before the official release, this statutory obligation should rightfully override that. The very simple way in which Bristol & Durham handled my request was to not respond, and that's honestly fine given that I have no official formal relationship with them yet. Maybe I can try again once my admissions counselor in school officially sends in my application and let you know?


Nice try. But from what I understand, rights under Freedom of information or GDPR provisions on these could be borderline. But ofc. as you said, the easiest thing is for them not to respond. (I think there is time limits of 30 days).

In UK, universities hold all the cards and students hold all the risk of uncertainty. Also because of politics on fee, more places are going to foreigners to the students in India, China and other places, to those who can spend 3/5 times we do.

Should try US unis when pound recovers.
😂😂😂😂😂😂
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 6
Original post by Muttley79
Unis get A level results before the student does too ...

That does not impact application decision. But LNAT does, if your scores are great, you apply to unis. that want LNAT otherwise not.
Original post by Sgcheam
That does not impact application decision. But LNAT does, if your scores are great, you apply to unis. that want LNAT otherwise not.


I was just saying the situation is not unusual
Reply 8
I think that if one has access to a Pearson Vue account as I do and some acceptance to a university such as Oxford or Cambridge or London as I do then one should not incur the adversities of LNAT exam as such institutions are ordinarily associated with Pearson Vue and could award their candidates LNAT exam on their payment schedules or on the requirements of LNAT or Oxbridge Applications accordingly, thank you.

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