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Can I get into an Economics and Policy MSc with a Political Economy Bsc?

I'm in Y13 and I have already sent my UCAS application my #1 and #2 unis that I want to go into is KCL and City, University of London for Political Economy. I want to think ahead about my master's and want to delve deeper into Economics and Policy and was wondering if it's possible Political Economy is a good undergrad degree as a stepping stone for an MSc in Economics and Policy. Besides KCL and City, I chose Politics and Economics for SOAS as my #3 option, Economics and Social Policy for Birbeck as my #4 and Economics as my #5 for Goldsmiths.

The reason why I couldn't apply for Economics for the top unis was that I didn't do A-Level maths and only figured for the past 2 years that I wanted to do Economics in the future in my career.
Original post by Nicky_EDC
I'm in Y13 and I have already sent my UCAS application my #1 and #2 unis that I want to go into is KCL and City, University of London for Political Economy. I want to think ahead about my master's and want to delve deeper into Economics and Policy and was wondering if it's possible Political Economy is a good undergrad degree as a stepping stone for an MSc in Economics and Policy. Besides KCL and City, I chose Politics and Economics for SOAS as my #3 option, Economics and Social Policy for Birbeck as my #4 and Economics as my #5 for Goldsmiths.

The reason why I couldn't apply for Economics for the top unis was that I didn't do A-Level maths and only figured for the past 2 years that I wanted to do Economics in the future in my career.


I can never understand why people don't look at the entry requirements of the degrees that they want to do.

Look at the following MSc for example: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/courses/economics-and-policy-msc
Entry requirements are: "Bachelor’s degree with high 2:1 honours (i.e. overall average of at least 65% across all years of study) in any discipline."
In other words, you can do a random degree in business, maths, or modern languages and still get in if you have at least 65% average in your degree.

Second degree example: https://www.york.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/courses/msc-economics-public-policy/#entry
"2:1 or equivalent in Economics, Finance or a related discipline, with evidence on your degree transcript of strong grades in economics, mathematics and statistics modules at an intermediate (2nd year) level."
Economics is fine, but you need to have maths and stats module in your second year. If your bachelor's doesn't have something along the lines of econometrics, mathematical economics, microeconomics, macroeconomics in your second year, then you might struggle with this.

Third example: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2023/economics-and-public-policy-msc#entry-req
"Minimum 2:1 undergraduate honours degree in economics or a related subject with a strong emphasis on macroeconomics, microeconomics, mathematics and statistics."
Similar story to the second example

Fourth example: https://www.ul.ie/gps/course/economics-policy-analysis-msc
"Normally applicants will possess a minimum 2:2 honours primary degree (Level 8 - National Qualifications Authority of Ireland) in economics or a programme where economics is a major component (for example, business/commerce)"
You are fine with this.

Fifth: https://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/pg01466/1/ma-economics-with-public-policy
"A 2.2 Degree in any discipline with some evidence of quantitative ability."
Similar story to the second and third examples.

Sixth: https://ase.uva.nl/content/masters/economics-public-policy/application-and-admission/application-and-admission.html#2-Check-the-entry-requirements (I wasn't sure how adventurous you are feeling)
See: https://ase.uva.nl/content/masters/economics/application-and-admission/students-with-international-prior-education/international-applicants.html#1-Your-academic-Bachelors-degree
"If you want to apply for this Master’s programme, you need to hold an academic Bachelor's or Master’s degree in Economics or have taken economics as a major subject.
You are expected to have taken all courses at intermediate level in:
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Econometrics and/or quantitative research methods
Additionally, you are expected to have a solid background in mathematics and statistics."
Similar story to examples 2, 3, and 5.

Do as much research as you want with these postgrad degrees. You may want to consider doing a PhD instead/as well, depending on your career ambitions.

Personal recommendation: sit out for a gap year and do A Level Maths. It's going to be a lot easier to find suitable courses to do and you won't have to fuss over things like this. If you need pointers on how to do this, let me know.
Alternatively, there's a chance the postgrad admissions will ask you to do a PGDip in Economics (conversions) on top of your degree if you don't have the necessary modules (I am not entirely sure what the entry requirements are for individual PGDips, but you can check for them yourself).

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