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Going from 2s and 3s to 5s and 6s in GCSEs in 3 months

Is it even possible to go from 2s and 3s to 5s and 6s in GCSE in 3 months. I am resitting my GCSEs so I want to know if this is possible and has anyone does this before? Also please let me know when you started revising for GCSEs? And your revision techniques and tips for science maths and history? And when you started revising what grade did you go from for example a 3 to a 6 by revising. When I did my GCSE I hardly revised for them and my exam technique which was really bad but I have learnt from my mistake and I have brought the CGP books and I am revising from them. Can someone tell me how I should be revising for combined science, maths and history. Thank you
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 1
Little bursts of revision fairly often, e.g 45 minutes of revision then a 15-minute break x2, then you stop for a hour before you go again.

Find what works for you, just reading the textbook over and over probably won't leave a lasting imprint in your brain, try to do loads of practice questions and maybe use some flashcards online/make your own. A friend of mine would make a mindmap for a topic, writing out literally everything they could remember then looking at the textbook to see what they missed, then did it again.

For Physics I made up sentences that would correlate to the equations, then at the start of the exam I would write those sentences out and then translate them to all the equations so I could flick back and look at them later in the exam, e.g PIR WIV VIR at the EPQ (Pire With Vire at the EPQ).

For all the sciences generally, learn to not waffle, just put out the straight facts in bullet points, unless its an evaluation question, though I don't think combined science would have that, watch videos explaining things if you don't understand them. There's no point just trying to learn words that have no meaning to you.

Maths is 100% just do practice questions, watch videos for methods if you get stuck.

History, flashcards are your best friend, getting all those specific numbers for dates, amounts of people, deaths, etc is vitally important. Then you can try to then write out a timeline for the period of your topic, list with as much detail as you can, and try to see how it all links together as evaluation is a big part of History (this is similar to the mind maps). Time yourself writing out answers to the chonky essay questions, it's about 1.5 minutes per mark roughly. Doing these practice essays will help a lot as chances are a similar question might show up come the exam.

You got this!!
(edited 1 year ago)
I didn't take history GCSE, but it's pretty much the same as other subjects I guess; lots of practice, and memorising the information accurately.

As for science and maths, try to do practice papers/past papers on a regular basis. Build this up until you get used to doing them and remember to use the mark schemes to mark your answers. This benefits you by helping you identify which answers were wrong/why. It will also tell you any keywords you need to include in your answer to get the marks, as well as what info you need to mention. You should already be revising, quite regularly too, say every day for a few hours. It is definitely possible to improve your grade by any magnitude, no matter how high or low you've started, but it all comes with hard work and practice, so keep going!

Some websites I can recommend for you to find exam questions/practice papers are included below. Remember to find your specific exam board for each subject, and try to do any past papers in timed conditions, to get you used to them, and get you ready to work faster in the exam room.

https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/
https://corbettmaths.com/
https://www.savemyexams.co.uk/
https://www.youtube.com/@TheGCSEMathsTutor

Before anythign though, you need to enusre you can actualy UNDERSTAND the content you are learning, so ask your teacher for help, and try to find explanations online ( I've included a youtube channel for science)

Finally, one last useful mehtod of revision is flashcards. These are helpful in memorising content, such as keywords and processes in science (or dates/events in history).

Hope that helps! :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Yes it's absolutely possible. At this time last year, my eldest son was getting 2s and 3s in Computer Science mocks. He ended up with a 5 in the real thing.

Lots of revision. Lots and lots of revision. Make it active though - don't just read through things. Use flash cards, lots of past papers, and if you have someone you can sit down with one-on-one who can test you on things that's also a big help.
Original post by Izzy^
Little bursts of revision fairly often, e.g 45 minutes of revision then a 15-minute break x2, then you stop for a hour before you go again.

Find what works for you, just reading the textbook over and over probably won't leave a lasting imprint in your brain, try to do loads of practice questions and maybe use some flashcards online/make your own. A friend of mine would make a mindmap for a topic, writing out literally everything they could remember then looking at the textbook to see what they missed, then did it again.

For Physics I made up sentences that would correlate to the equations, then at the start of the exam I would write those sentences out and then translate them to all the equations so I could flick back and look at them later in the exam, e.g PIR WIV VIR at the EPQ (Pire With Vire at the EPQ).

For all the sciences generally, learn to not waffle, just put out the straight facts in bullet points, unless its an evaluation question, though I don't think combined science would have that, watch videos explaining things if you don't understand them. There's no point just trying to learn words that have no meaning to you.

Maths is 100% just do practice questions, watch videos for methods if you get stuck.

History, flashcards are your best friend, getting all those specific numbers for dates, amounts of people, deaths, etc is vitally important. Then you can try to then write out a timeline for the period of your topic, list with as much detail as you can, and try to see how it all links together as evaluation is a big part of History (this is similar to the mind maps). Time yourself writing out answers to the chonky essay questions, it's about 1.5 minutes per mark roughly. Doing these practice essays will help a lot as chances are a similar question might show up come the exam.

You got this!!

Thank you for the advice if I do this for 3 month is it possible to get 5 and 6s I only need to sit exams for 3 subjects so In total I have 12 exams.
Reply 5
Original post by Kitten4321
Thank you for the advice if I do this for 3 month is it possible to get 5 and 6s I only need to sit exams for 3 subjects so In total I have 12 exams.

Absolutely, just keep it up, if you have a teacher or tutor to help you out by marking things and discussing improvement, that would help as well.

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