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Twelfth Night Metaphors

In Violas soliloquy about Feste. Could anyone help be to define how the metaphors and similes contribute to the reading/theme of Twelfth Night . I have drawn a blank on this part and am going in the wrong direction by over complicating . Thank you for any suggestions you may have.

VIOLA

This fellow is wise enough to play the fool,
And to do that well craves a kind of wit.
He must observe their mood on whom he jests,
The quality of persons, and the time,
And like the haggard, check at every feather
That comes before his eye. This is a practice
As full of labour as a wise man’s art,
For folly that he wisely shows is fit,
But wise men, folly-fall'n, quite taint their wit
Hi, did you find someone to assist you?
Reply 2
Is this for AQA comedy paper 1?
Original post by Debo M
In Violas soliloquy about Feste. Could anyone help be to define how the metaphors and similes contribute to the reading/theme of Twelfth Night . I have drawn a blank on this part and am going in the wrong direction by over complicating . Thank you for any suggestions you may have.

VIOLA

This fellow is wise enough to play the fool,
And to do that well craves a kind of wit.
He must observe their mood on whom he jests,
The quality of persons, and the time,
And like the haggard, check at every feather
That comes before his eye. This is a practice
As full of labour as a wise man’s art,
For folly that he wisely shows is fit,
But wise men, folly-fall'n, quite taint their wit

a haggard is a kind of hawk i think - so this takes a metaphor from the noble/ courtly art of falconry. i think it means that a hawk is always looking about for prey, sometimes mistaking feathers for prey. similarly feste is always on the look out for comic material and sorting what would be the basis for a funny joke from what wouldn't. I'm not sure how falconry relates to the rest of the play, but here it gives the amusing impression that being a fool is like being a majestic and alert hawk.
The equating of comedy/ jesting with a more respected 'wise man's art' is also metatheatrical and is a kind of semi sincere self justification by shakespeare. It's a typical feature of comedy, especially the roman and before that greek comedy that this is based on to have a passage where the act of comedy writing itself is defended, or the position of being a 'parasite' like in Plautus' Menaechmi which bears some resemblance to twelfth night.

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