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exothermic reaction

what will happen if i increase the temperature in a exothermic reaction like neutralization reaction
I'm just gonna go and assume this is an equilibrium question and in that case:

The position of equilibrium will move to counter this change and decrease the temperature. If the forward reaction is exothermic (and therefore the backwards reaction is endothermic), the position of equilibrium will favour the endothermic reaction and shift to the left to decrease the temperature, and the yield of compounds on the left hand side will increase. If the backward reaction is exothermic, then the opposite occurs.
Original post by biotech student
what will happen if i increase the temperature in a exothermic reaction like neutralization reaction


Think of a change in a chemical equilibrium. An increasing temperature would change this equilibrium in favor of the endothermic part of a reaction. In a neutralization reaction it would be the side of the acids and base, because the exothermic reaction is on the neutralization side.
Original post by biotech student
what will happen if i increase the temperature in a exothermic reaction like neutralization reaction

Generally speaking, increasing the temperature of a reaction will simply increase the rate at which it proceeds.

Assuming the reaction is non-reversible, like most neutralisation reactions that I am aware of, this will be the only real effect.

Assuming the reaction is reversible, then @Kallisto and @GeT_iN_SHinJI are both completely right. The increased temperature, despite increasing the rate of the exothermic route, will also increase the rate of the endothermic route equally as much and once equilibrium is reached, the equilibrium position will lie towards the side of the equilibrium that the endothermic route takes.
Original post by TypicalNerd
Generally speaking, increasing the temperature of a reaction will simply increase the rate at which it proceeds.

Assuming the reaction is non-reversible, like most neutralisation reactions that I am aware of, this will be the only real effect.

Assuming the reaction is reversible, then @Kallisto and @GeT_iN_SHinJI are both completely right. The increased temperature, despite increasing the rate of the exothermic route, will also increase the rate of the endothermic route equally as much and once equilibrium is reached, the equilibrium position will lie towards the side of the equilibrium that the endothermic route takes.


For non-reversible neutralization reactions I thought that increasing temperature leads to the required activation energy to enable that reaction and to change the kinetics of reaction maybe. That might be another reasonable effect.

It is true that just a few acid-base reactions are reversible, conjugate acid-base-pairs to be exact.
Original post by Kallisto
For non-reversible neutralization reactions I thought that increasing temperature leads to the required activation energy to enable that reaction and to change the kinetics of reaction maybe. That might be another reasonable effect.

It is true that just a few acid-base reactions are reversible, conjugate acid-base-pairs to be exact.


I guess it depends on which reagents you are using in the first place, but you are correct. I guess I had missed the possibility that the kinetics could be changed.

The first example of a reversible neutralisation reaction that came to mind is the one where you heat ammonium chloride, so it dissociates into HCl and NH3 (the reverse route of this reaction is technically a neutralisation reaction)

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