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Wanting to study Chemical Engineering

I’m taking Bio, Chem and Maths but no physics (and it’s a bit late to switch now lol).
I heard the course is highly competitive and although the uni’s that I want to go to don’t require physics should I still get some qualification in it? (maybe an AS or idk)
Are you first year A Levels? I am assuming this as it means you would not yet have applied to UCAS. If you search the UCAS website for courses, they will give clear entry requirements. I suspect for chemical engineering, you will need Maths and Chemistry, with Physics being an advantage but not essential. Depending on which universities you choose, getting high grades (A* and A grades) will be the most important alongside your Maths and Chemistry. You could add an AS in Physics, or EPQ to your application to boost your profile (assuming your institution offers it) but only if the additional course does not impact on your overall A Level grades. Work experience and/or completing MOOCs in the subject area could also help and you could do these in the summer before next academic year, so reduce the chances of impacting on your studies. Also, think about summer schools, some of which are free. Sutton Trust may be an option for you, if you are eligible.
Hi @atarisroses

Whilst it might be helpful to study physics when pursuing chemical engineering, I'm happy to say it's actually not always necessary.

I'm currently in my third year of studying chemical engineering at Sheffield and I only studied biology, chemistry and maths as well.
These subjects are still very applicable to the chemical engineering degree, and you wouldn't be viewed as a weaker candidate for it.

Actually, depending on the type of chemical engineering degree you apply for, it can be quite beneficial to study biology. An example of this is Sheffield's chemical engineering course, as the department is called the department of chemical and biological engineering, it means we also study modules that are closely linked with bioengineering.

It's probably a good idea to complete an EPQ in a subject that is relevant to chemical engineering rather than pursuing a physics AS in my opinion :smile:

I hope that this has helped!
From Orla - 3rd Year Chemical Engineering Student.
Original post by atarisroses
I’m taking Bio, Chem and Maths but no physics (and it’s a bit late to switch now lol).
I heard the course is highly competitive and although the uni’s that I want to go to don’t require physics should I still get some qualification in it? (maybe an AS or idk)

Heya!
I would recommend looking into entry requirements for chemical engineering using uniguide :h: If entry requirements don't specifically state that you need physics, then you won't need it, and you won't be seen as a weaker candidate for it. If it helps, Study Mind has free chem and bio resources you might find helpful as well!

I hope this helps!
Milena
UCL PFE
Study Mind
Original post by atarisroses
I’m taking Bio, Chem and Maths but no physics (and it’s a bit late to switch now lol).
I heard the course is highly competitive and although the uni’s that I want to go to don’t require physics should I still get some qualification in it? (maybe an AS or idk)

Hi atarisroses

I'm a 4th year Chemical Engineering student at Lancaster. I would say Physics may help in some aspects but is not required most of the time. I can say that from personal experience as the A-levels I took where Chemistry, Maths and Computer Science.

I think it depends on the University and thier course structure but at Lancaster, the first year is a General Engineering year where everyone will do modules in mechanical, chemical, electrical, computer coding / software and engineering maths. First year is treated as a development year to make sure everyone has the requires skills for the rest of their degree. This helps as people on the course can come from a bunch of different backgrounds with BTECs or different options of A-levels. For example those who didn't do physics may find with the Mechanical modules with stress and strain or Electrical modules with circuits dificult initially but they are designed to help you build up that knowledge gap, the same would go for those that didn't do A-level chemistry with things like mass balances, selectivity and yield for example.

I would advise looking at the Universities course structure and modules before hand and maybe do an EPQ or some home revision that might help bridge the gap in knowledge you may have. In terms of the course at Lancaster, an A-level in Physics is not required and the main thing that is used is probably thermodynamics which kind of bridges the gap between Physics and Chemistry.

I hope this is reassuring and helps calm your mind a bit.

Patrick - 4th Year Chemical Engineering Student Ambassador

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