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hospitality and catering or french

I’m picking my GCSEs soon and I’m struggling to decide on what to pick. I want a job to do with psychology in the future (psychologist, psychiatrist, psychotherapist). I’m planning on choosing history & sociology but idk what to pick between hospitality and catering & french. Hospitality and catering is something I really enjoy doing so I’d put more effort into it and probably get a better grade,?but French would help me get the EBacc qualification. What should I do? Should I drop sociology and pick french + hospitality and catering? Please help!
(edited 1 year ago)

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Reply 1
Original post by lsfrm
I’m picking my GCSEs soon and I’m struggling to decide on what to pick. I want a job to do with psychology in the future. I’m planning on choosing history & sociology but idk what to pick between hospitality and catering & french. Hospitality and catering is something I really enjoy doing so I’d put more effort into it and probably get a better grade,?but French would help me get the EBacc qualification. What should I do? Should I drop sociology and pick french + hospitality and catering? Please help!


Check university and see what subjects they want from there u can pick the best one for you.
Eg: Manchester uni want biology, psychology, chemistry, physics btec applied science maths.
Any three of these

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2023/00653/bsc-psychology/entry-requirements/#course-profile

Psychology is offered in combination with a very wide range of subjects, including:

Criminology, criminal investigation, forensic science
Sociology, social anthropology, social care, philosophy
Biology, zoology, animal behaviour, environmental science
Education, childhood studies, child development, counselling
Accounting, finance, HR management, advertising, business, economics, entrepreneurship, marketing
Archaeology, architectural design, art and design history, Celtic studies
Computer science, computing, digital media and information, film and media studies
English, creative writing, journalism, publishing, drama and theatre studies, dance, music
Philosophy, politics, law, international relations
Social history, European studies, tourism, geography, religious studies
Mathematics, sport/sports studies
(edited 1 year ago)
You could plan ahead. Look into specifically what type of job you want, what university degree/qualifications you would need, then work back to what A-levels you will need for that degree and then what GCSEs you would need for that A-level. The only issue here is that it would be difficult to find job requirements and by saying you want a job in "psychology", it's a bit broad and you're very young to be deciding specifics anyway.

Another approach is to weigh out the pros and cons.

Taking French will generally make employers and colleges/sixth forms like you more (as it is viewed as more academic and difficult), but without an intention to become fluent (or at least intermediate) in the language at some point in the future, it seems like a waste of time. GCSE French will only take you to a good beginner level of the language (A2) or maybe an early intermediate (B1) if you study it more in your spare time, but it will not make you fluent enough to use it in a future career unless you're planning to study it more in your spare time after GCSEs or even take it at A-levels (which would get you at an employable level). However, French is a subject that looks good in context with all careers. Not saying you will, but if you decided to take biomed (for example) French would not look weird with it. However hospitality and catering is more specific, meaning it's only really useful in the context of being a chef/cook and probably a few examples I can't think of from the top of my head.

French Exams - What exam board are you taking? For the most mainstream ones (AQA, Pearson...) you will get a speaking exam, listening exam, writing exam and a reading exam. (4 GCSEs) I would advise you to look at the specifics for your exam board if your decision will be impacted by these, to see the specifics of it. Bare in mind, these exams do not require you to be alike to a native speaker AT ALL. They require you to have a basic understanding of the language to pass.

Taking hospitality & catering, however, gives you a backup choice if you realise psychology isn't for you. Since you seem to like hospitality & catering, it shows that if you dislike psychology later on, you'll have more of a chance to get into this subject area when you're older. Since you're young and vulnerable to changing your mind, this is probably a good thing. However, it is viewed as more vocational (in other words, less academic) so it entirely depends on your decision.

Hospitality & Catering Exams - Again, I advise to look for the specifics of your exam board. Typically, you have a cooking exam (which is about 5 hours long) where you have to cook a starter & meal or meal & dessert (your choice). However, they give you a specific theme to base it on (a previous year based on an occasion/holiday (Christmas, Chinese New Year, etc...) Then you'll have a boring theory paper, but it shouldn't be too difficult as the subject is quite vocational.

Overall, when you do the things you like, life will generally move in the right direction. Not always. But try to trust that if you're doing something you enjoy, you'll probably be lead to opportunities and situations (next level education wise) that will eventually lead you to an enjoyable job. To conclude, look at the specifications of the course, exams, content and see what you'd prefer most. Even look up videos on peoples experiences with certain subjects. What they liked about it, what they disliked. Best of luck!
Original post by pigeon21
You could plan ahead. Look into specifically what type of job you want, what university degree/qualifications you would need, then work back to what A-levels you will need for that degree and then what GCSEs you would need for that A-level. The only issue here is that it would be difficult to find job requirements and by saying you want a job in "psychology", it's a bit broad and you're very young to be deciding specifics anyway.

Another approach is to weigh out the pros and cons.

Taking French will generally make employers and colleges/sixth forms like you more (as it is viewed as more academic and difficult), but without an intention to become fluent (or at least intermediate) in the language at some point in the future, it seems like a waste of time. GCSE French will only take you to a good beginner level of the language (A2) or maybe an early intermediate (B1) if you study it more in your spare time, but it will not make you fluent enough to use it in a future career unless you're planning to study it more in your spare time after GCSEs or even take it at A-levels (which would get you at an employable level). However, French is a subject that looks good in context with all careers. Not saying you will, but if you decided to take biomed (for example) French would not look weird with it. However hospitality and catering is more specific, meaning it's only really useful in the context of being a chef/cook and probably a few examples I can't think of from the top of my head.

French Exams - What exam board are you taking? For the most mainstream ones (AQA, Pearson...) you will get a speaking exam, listening exam, writing exam and a reading exam. (4 GCSEs) I would advise you to look at the specifics for your exam board if your decision will be impacted by these, to see the specifics of it. Bare in mind, these exams do not require you to be alike to a native speaker AT ALL. They require you to have a basic understanding of the language to pass.

Taking hospitality & catering, however, gives you a backup choice if you realise psychology isn't for you. Since you seem to like hospitality & catering, it shows that if you dislike psychology later on, you'll have more of a chance to get into this subject area when you're older. Since you're young and vulnerable to changing your mind, this is probably a good thing. However, it is viewed as more vocational (in other words, less academic) so it entirely depends on your decision.

Hospitality & Catering Exams - Again, I advise to look for the specifics of your exam board. Typically, you have a cooking exam (which is about 5 hours long) where you have to cook a starter & meal or meal & dessert (your choice). However, they give you a specific theme to base it on (a previous year based on an occasion/holiday (Christmas, Chinese New Year, etc...) Then you'll have a boring theory paper, but it shouldn't be too difficult as the subject is quite vocational.

Overall, when you do the things you like, life will generally move in the right direction. Not always. But try to trust that if you're doing something you enjoy, you'll probably be lead to opportunities and situations (next level education wise) that will eventually lead you to an enjoyable job. To conclude, look at the specifications of the course, exams, content and see what you'd prefer most. Even look up videos on peoples experiences with certain subjects. What they liked about it, what they disliked. Best of luck!

Edit: I forgot to mention. Do NOT drop sociology if you want to do psychology. It's the closest you're gonna get at GCSE level.
Original post by pigeon21
You could plan ahead. Look into specifically what type of job you want, what university degree/qualifications you would need, then work back to what A-levels you will need for that degree and then what GCSEs you would need for that A-level. The only issue here is that it would be difficult to find job requirements and by saying you want a job in "psychology", it's a bit broad and you're very young to be deciding specifics anyway.

Another approach is to weigh out the pros and cons.

Taking French will generally make employers and colleges/sixth forms like you more (as it is viewed as more academic and difficult), but without an intention to become fluent (or at least intermediate) in the language at some point in the future, it seems like a waste of time. GCSE French will only take you to a good beginner level of the language (A2) or maybe an early intermediate (B1) if you study it more in your spare time, but it will not make you fluent enough to use it in a future career unless you're planning to study it more in your spare time after GCSEs or even take it at A-levels (which would get you at an employable level). However, French is a subject that looks good in context with all careers. Not saying you will, but if you decided to take biomed (for example) French would not look weird with it. However hospitality and catering is more specific, meaning it's only really useful in the context of being a chef/cook and probably a few examples I can't think of from the top of my head.

French Exams - What exam board are you taking? For the most mainstream ones (AQA, Pearson...) you will get a speaking exam, listening exam, writing exam and a reading exam. (4 GCSEs) I would advise you to look at the specifics for your exam board if your decision will be impacted by these, to see the specifics of it. Bare in mind, these exams do not require you to be alike to a native speaker AT ALL. They require you to have a basic understanding of the language to pass.

Taking hospitality & catering, however, gives you a backup choice if you realise psychology isn't for you. Since you seem to like hospitality & catering, it shows that if you dislike psychology later on, you'll have more of a chance to get into this subject area when you're older. Since you're young and vulnerable to changing your mind, this is probably a good thing. However, it is viewed as more vocational (in other words, less academic) so it entirely depends on your decision.

Hospitality & Catering Exams - Again, I advise to look for the specifics of your exam board. Typically, you have a cooking exam (which is about 5 hours long) where you have to cook a starter & meal or meal & dessert (your choice). However, they give you a specific theme to base it on (a previous year based on an occasion/holiday (Christmas, Chinese New Year, etc...) Then you'll have a boring theory paper, but it shouldn't be too difficult as the subject is quite vocational.

Overall, when you do the things you like, life will generally move in the right direction. Not always. But try to trust that if you're doing something you enjoy, you'll probably be lead to opportunities and situations (next level education wise) that will eventually lead you to an enjoyable job. To conclude, look at the specifications of the course, exams, content and see what you'd prefer most. Even look up videos on peoples experiences with certain subjects. What they liked about it, what they disliked. Best of luck!


This was really helpful, thank you!
Original post by lsfrm
I’m picking my GCSEs soon and I’m struggling to decide on what to pick. I want a job to do with psychology in the future (psychologist, psychiatrist, psychotherapist). I’m planning on choosing history & sociology but idk what to pick between hospitality and catering & french. Hospitality and catering is something I really enjoy doing so I’d put more effort into it and probably get a better grade,?but French would help me get the EBacc qualification. What should I do? Should I drop sociology and pick french + hospitality and catering? Please help!

No uni requires the Ebacc or indeed a MFL GCSE. The Ebacc is NOT a qualification its a measure of your school - not you. Do what you enjoy please :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by pigeon21
Taking French will generally make employers and colleges/sixth forms like you more (as it is viewed as more academic and difficult), but without an intention to become fluent (or at least intermediate) in the language at some point in the future, it seems like a waste of time. GCSE French will only take you to a good beginner level of the language


Sorry this is completely wrong - no uni requires a MFL not do employers or sixth forms - please check information you give :smile:
Original post by Muttley79
Sorry this is completely wrong - no uni requires a MFL not do employers or sixth forms - please check information you give :smile:

I'm sorry, I think you've misunderstood what I've said slightly.

I outlined that (particularly for competitive universities or sixth forms/colleges, although I didn't specify this) there are biases for certain subjects when considering which students to accept, as they have a limited number of spaces. Languages are a safe option (as long as you do well in it) alongside most subject choices, due to their flexibility and use in many career areas.

I understand when I say "an employable level" some could interpret this as me saying French is a "requirement" to be employed. However, the context of the paragraph indicates that I'm talking about when someone learns French to a proficiency that would give them real advantages in the context of employment.

I say that there is not much point in taking the GCSE if you're not intending to study the language at the higher level, because to use it in a career, GCSE isn't very useful; it only brings you to an A2 level of language which doesn't give you any employability advantages. It just gives you nice grades on paper, which you could still achieve with hospitality and catering. However, it's evident that universities and colleges have biases about certain subject choices so it's important to bare that in mind too when making a decision.

Just wanted to point out I never claimed that a MFL GCSE is a requirement to get into a sixth form or college for a course unrelated to MFLs. I also never claimed a MFL A-level is a requirement to get into a University for a course that has nothing to do with languages. I never claimed that ANY study of MFLs is a bare minimum to be employed. If you could provide quotes on where the confusion came from in my response I'd be pleased to know.
Original post by pigeon21
However, it's evident that universities and colleges have biases about certain subject choices so it's important to bare that in mind too when making a decision.

This is wrong - why are you saying it again? You may have expressed yourself poorly but this sentence is just false.
Reply 9
Original post by lsfrm
I’m picking my GCSEs soon and I’m struggling to decide on what to pick. I want a job to do with psychology in the future (psychologist, psychiatrist, psychotherapist). I’m planning on choosing history & sociology but idk what to pick between hospitality and catering & french. Hospitality and catering is something I really enjoy doing so I’d put more effort into it and probably get a better grade,?but French would help me get the EBacc qualification. What should I do? Should I drop sociology and pick french + hospitality and catering? Please help!

I think especially with uni what I've found is that they not only look at your grades, but the variety of the subject choice. Having a 7/8/9 in a language like French always looks better to an admissions selector. Also, a lot of unis have a preferred subjects list (which any modern language always appears on) as well as a non-preferred subject list (hospitality, home ec, health and social care etc always appear on that).

Ultimately, if you're going to hate French then I wouldn't recommend it... but I think a 7 in French looks better than a 9 in H&C.
Original post by Muttley79
This is wrong - why are you saying it again? You may have expressed yourself poorly but this sentence is just false.

No it's not... most unis in general (especially Russell Group) have biases towards certain subjects regardless of the course. Idk why they view some as more serious than others, but they do.
Original post by Muttley79
This is wrong - why are you saying it again? You may have expressed yourself poorly but this sentence is just false.

Not really...

Also, if you disagreed with what I said, this is how to prove your point.

DOs: Say I'm incorrect and say what your counter-opinion is and maybe explain why.

DON'Ts: Come up with a ridiculous claim that no one agrees with, pretend I said it when I clearly didn't, and disagree with it.
(You did this when you said that I claimed MFLs are a requirement for sixth forms/unis and jobs)
Nowhere in my first response claims this or even alludes to it.

All you had to do was say you disagree that universities have bias towards certain subjects in the first place. Explain your opinion why. If you did that, you could have some valuable insight You don't have to completely misconstrue my point and claim that I said MFLs are a requirement for sixth forms, unis and jobs. Anyone with a good point doesn't have to lie about what they're arguing against.
Original post by abimt78
No it's not... most unis in general (especially Russell Group) have biases towards certain subjects regardless of the course. Idk why they view some as more serious than others, but they do.

Thank you btw
Original post by abimt78
No it's not... most unis in general (especially Russell Group) have biases towards certain subjects regardless of the course. Idk why they view some as more serious than others, but they do.

No - these distinctions were phased out years ago - please post proof.
Original post by pigeon21
Not really...



Prove this preference please. It was phased out some years ago. There is no such thing as 'facilitating subjects'
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/may/23/russell-group-scraps-preferred-a-levels-list-after-arts-subjects-hit

"Arts education organisations have welcomed a decision by the Russell Group of research-led universities to scrap its controversial list of preferred A-levels, after long-running criticism that it has contributed to a devaluation of arts subjects.

The group’s list of so-called “facilitating subjects”, including maths, English, sciences, languages, history and geography, was originally drawn up to help pupils choose A-levels that would open doors to more degrees at the most selective universities.

Critics claim it has resulted in a narrowing of the school curriculum, squeezing out arts and creative subjects in favour of the more traditional, academic subjects included on the list. Subjects like art and music have been among the hardest hit. ..."


2019 decision so FOUR years ago
Original post by Muttley79
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/may/23/russell-group-scraps-preferred-a-levels-list-after-arts-subjects-hit

"Arts education organisations have welcomed a decision by the Russell Group of research-led universities to scrap its controversial list of preferred A-levels, after long-running criticism that it has contributed to a devaluation of arts subjects.

The group’s list of so-called “facilitating subjects”, including maths, English, sciences, languages, history and geography, was originally drawn up to help pupils choose A-levels that would open doors to more degrees at the most selective universities.

Critics claim it has resulted in a narrowing of the school curriculum, squeezing out arts and creative subjects in favour of the more traditional, academic subjects included on the list. Subjects like art and music have been among the hardest hit. ..."


2019 decision so FOUR years ago

After a minute of searching I found this on the LSE website:
https://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Undergraduate/Prospective-Students/How-to-Apply/Admissions-Information
(click on the box that says subject combinations)
Original post by abimt78
After a minute of searching I found this on the LSE website:
https://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Undergraduate/Prospective-Students/How-to-Apply/Admissions-Information
(click on the box that says subject combinations)


Read the srticle - you can't possibly have done so. Of course you nneed certain A levels like Maths for Engineering - that is not what this discussion is about!
Original post by abimt78


Ultimately, if you're going to hate French then I wouldn't recommend it... but I think a 7 in French looks better than a 9 in H&C.


Wrong - no university asks for a MFL or 'prefers' a GCSE in MFL.

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