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Uni choices

Can someone please help

I'm about to start A levels as a private candidate but I don't know what major do I want to go into.

I really want to do music production and songwriting, but it's quite expensive and my dad said that I don't need to go to uni if I want to do that as a career.

He suggest that I do computer sci and take courses for music production, but I don't really like coding

I'm also thingking of maybe doing law or something in psychology, but where I live, there is barely any career in psychology

Now I'm really confused as to where I want to major
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by BraveEagle
Can someone please help

I'm about to start A levels as a private candidate but I don't know what major do I want to go into.

I really want to do music production and songwriting, but it's quite expensive and my dad said that I don't need to go to uni if I want to do that as a career.

He suggest that I do computer sci and take courses for music production, but I don't really like coding

I'm also thingking of maybe doing law or something in psychology, but where I live, there is barely any career in psychology

Now I'm really confused as to where I want to major


You might also want to tell your dad that you don't need a degree in computer science to go into tech (usually professional IT certifications are more credible, unless you want to go into academic research or work for the NHS in bioinformatics).

If you don't like coding, then you shouldn't really do computer science since most of it is coding.

A psychology degree (or most degrees for that matter) does not restrict you to a specific discipline; often you can apply for work outside of your discipline should you want with a degree in any subject. A degree in psychology (if accredited by the BPS) will allow you to work in psychology related professions, but it's a ridiculously competitive area.

There is only a handful of areas where you would need a degree (or where relevant degrees are appreciated) to get into them. These include:

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Economics

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Architecture

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Most things in healthcare and life sciences including medicine

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Engineering

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Education

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Most things in research/academia

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Law


The areas where you can do degree apprenticeships include economics, architecture, engineering, law, life science research, and medicine. The areas where you will need to specifically go to university for would be in healthcare, education, and research/academia.
A BPS accredited psychology degree falls under one of those areas in healthcare.

There are over 200 careers that you can go into with just GCSEs, according to websites like Career Pilot and National Careers Service. Another 400 on top if you are willing to go to an adult college, do professional qualifications, or do further training. The above areas in healthcare, education, and research/academia make up the 200 or so remaining job profiles.

If you want a more defined list of fields that you can go into with any degree/zero qualifiations, they include:

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Administration

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Government services

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Social work

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Some areas of healthcare

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Most areas of business

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IT roles (but it's recommended that you have specific IT certicfications relevant to the specific role)

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Some areas of construction

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Most areas of property

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Most areas of beauty ad wellbeing

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Creative/design and media (if you're good)

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Theatre and film (if you're good)

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Music (if you're good)

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Anything related to writing (if you're good)

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Storage

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Logistics

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Armed forces and the police force (if you pass certain tests, have a clean record, and are below a certain age)

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Some environmental services

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Hospitality

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Manufacturing

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Management (if you have the relevant experience)

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Retail

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Care work

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Travel and tourism

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Charity

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Entertainment (if you're good)

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Translation (if you're fluent in more than one language)


You will be able to go into the following areas with further courses at college:

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Animal care (other than vet)

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Some areas of construction and certain trades

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Some areas of beauty and wellbeing

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Some areas of engineering


You can go into the following areas with specific professional qualifications on top:

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Accounting

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Actuary (if you have a strong maths background from A Level)

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Law for solicitor roles (nor barrister roles, you will need a law related degree/postgrad conversion course)

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Most areas of finance

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Delivery and transport (licenses)

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Sports coaching



So the key takeaway is that there aren't many areas where you strictly need a degree in terms of jobs in the UK. You can either go to university and do whatever you want and walk away trying to get into the above areas, or you can not do a degree and still get into the above areas.
The areas where you need to be wary of are if you want to get into education (where a relevant undergrad in the area you want to teach will help if you want to teach secondary education), healthcare (where the degree you do can kill your chances if it's not relevant or approved by relevant professional bodies), or go into research (although some areas can be somewhat flexible with what you studied in your undergrad, so long it's relevant).
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by BraveEagle
Can someone please help

I'm about to start A levels as a private candidate but I don't know what major do I want to go into.

I really want to do music production and songwriting, but it's quite expensive and my dad said that I don't need to go to uni if I want to do that as a career.

He suggest that I do computer sci and take courses for music production, but I don't really like coding

I'm also thingking of maybe doing law or something in psychology, but where I live, there is barely any career in psychology

Now I'm really confused as to where I want to major

Hello, I'm a final-year Computer Science student at Lancaster University. I also agree that it's better to choose the path that you are most interested in:smile: If coding is not your interest, then studying a degree in Computer Science might not be as enjoyable as doing something that you like. Studying for a degree isn't a must, but I chose to do so because I like the university campus and also enjoy student life. Besides, meeting and studying together with people from around the world who also want to pursue the same career or in the same industry is a fun experience. Sometimes people didn't end up with a career in the same industry as their major, and that is also okay, as different degrees are actually slightly inter-connected and people always end up collaborating with graduates from various degree backgrounds. I hope you'll be able to find a way that you feel most comfortable with. All the best to you! :smile:

- Miyuki (Lancaster University FST student ambassador)
Original post by BraveEagle
Can someone please help

I'm about to start A levels as a private candidate but I don't know what major do I want to go into.

I really want to do music production and songwriting, but it's quite expensive and my dad said that I don't need to go to uni if I want to do that as a career.

He suggest that I do computer sci and take courses for music production, but I don't really like coding

I'm also thingking of maybe doing law or something in psychology, but where I live, there is barely any career in psychology

Now I'm really confused as to where I want to major

Heya!
Perhaps uniguide (courses) and prospects (careers) can help you out with your research? :h: For law, there are no specific requirements but people do like to take essay subjects such as English lit (though it's not a must). For psychology, you would usually need psychology and biology. I would recommend doing some research on everything and noting down which ones interest you using the two websites I mentioned earlier ^. Then do some research on courses at unis and look at their entry requirements.

I hope this helps!
Milena
UCL PFE
Study Mind

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