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physics question

how can you make a metal plate negatively charged?
Original post by Ashirs
how can you make a metal plate negatively charged?

Typically an electrochemical cell setup uses an oxidising agent within the cell to remove electrons from the external circuit, causing one electrode to be +ve and a reducing agent within the cell to add electrons to the external circuit, causing the other electrode to pick up a -ve charge.

Presumably the same method could be used, wherein the electrodes used are metal plates.
Reply 2
Original post by TypicalNerd
Typically an electrochemical cell setup uses an oxidising agent within the cell to remove electrons from the external circuit, causing one electrode to be +ve and a reducing agent within the cell to add electrons to the external circuit, causing the other electrode to pick up a -ve charge.

Presumably the same method could be used, wherein the electrodes used are metal plates.


thank you for your reply! If i wanted to charge the metal plates negative and bacteria present in water positive, could I use the same principles?
Original post by Ashirs
thank you for your reply! If i wanted to charge the metal plates negative and bacteria present in water positive, could I use the same principles?


It’s an interesting idea and I imagine it depends on a lot of factors. I would guess it is possible but extremely difficult to do, since bacteria are made up of complex proteins and other biological molecules which I’d assume are quite difficult to ionise.
Reply 4
Original post by TypicalNerd
It’s an interesting idea and I imagine it depends on a lot of factors. I would guess it is possible but extremely difficult to do, since bacteria are made up of complex proteins and other biological molecules which I’d assume are quite difficult to ionise.


that's a valid point, thank you for your help though :smile:

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