The Student Room Group

Weight loss

Do you really need exercise and fruit and vegetables in your diet? I recently brought a short e book called Slender Slim Body. I weren't expecting miracles because I can never shed the fat but after 4 weeks I lost 1/2 stone. I am sooooo happy for first time see me losing all the fat. I'm still having a cake every single day. I feel like fool cause all the books are pointless it really is common sense. But it shows how to lose the fat without any exercise or eating fruit and vegetables. I'm really lazy and don't like taste of vegetables and fruit smoothies in particular have lots of sugar anyway.
(edited 1 year ago)
You need a calorie deficit to lose weight. That’s it.
The reason it’s portrayed you need to eat ‘healthier’ to do so is because those foods fill you up a lot more and you can eat more of them as they are much lower calorie. Let’s say for example a carrot is 10 calories and a slice of cake is 100, you could have 10 carrots for the calorie value of a slice of cake.

However a carrot isn’t a slice of cake and so you need balance. When I cut, I eat everything I would normally eat just in different proportions otherwise it’s not sustainable for anyone.
Exercise also helps get that deficit again because you are burning calories you aren’t putting back in.
Original post by Sati88
Do you really need exercise and fruit and vegetables in your diet? I recently brought a short e book called Slender Slim Body. I weren't expecting miracles because I can never shed the fat but after 4 weeks I lost 1/2 stone. I am sooooo happy for first time see me losing all the fat. I'm still having a cake every single day. I feel like fool cause all the books are pointless it really is common sense. But it shows how to lose the fat without any exercise or eating fruit and vegetables.

In order to lose weight, realistically all you need is consistency. Most people see results after 4 weeks of working out, with change it needs time unfortunately. For more efficient results you will need to work on yourself for a good couple of months depending on where you stand with your body. With your diet you don't need to cut out everything.. keep 80% of it healthy (ie fruits and veg for natural supplements such as vitamins and so on), protein (to keep you full, help you lose weight and keep lean muscle) and i think carbs is optional depending on the person but too much carbs is really bad for weight loss. Make sure to have 3 meals a day including breakfast because out of all meals it is actually the most important meal and there are even scientific studies to back this up. With the other 20% or less you can treat yourself so don't feel guilty about that. Don't restrict yourself too much just because of your weight/body image. Make sure to stay safe whilst losing weight too.
Reply 3
Original post by iwilleatyoursoul
In order to lose weight, realistically all you need is consistency. Most people see results after 4 weeks of working out, with change it needs time unfortunately. For more efficient results you will need to work on yourself for a good couple of months depending on where you stand with your body. With your diet you don't need to cut out everything.. keep 80% of it healthy (ie fruits and veg for natural supplements such as vitamins and so on), protein (to keep you full, help you lose weight and keep lean muscle) and i think carbs is optional depending on the person but too much carbs is really bad for weight loss. Make sure to have 3 meals a day including breakfast because out of all meals it is actually the most important meal and there are even scientific studies to back this up. With the other 20% or less you can treat yourself so don't feel guilty about that. Don't restrict yourself too much just because of your weight/body image. Make sure to stay safe whilst losing weight too.

Wow, it's like you already know what I'm doing. That makes me feel so much better. Yes to protein, some carbs, 3 meals daily, healthier foods and some treats. The only thing I don't like are vegetables. I think I can live with that. Thank you.
Reply 4
Original post by ALEreapp
You need a calorie deficit to lose weight. That’s it.
The reason it’s portrayed you need to eat ‘healthier’ to do so is because those foods fill you up a lot more and you can eat more of them as they are much lower calorie. Let’s say for example a carrot is 10 calories and a slice of cake is 100, you could have 10 carrots for the calorie value of a slice of cake.

However a carrot isn’t a slice of cake and so you need balance. When I cut, I eat everything I would normally eat just in different proportions otherwise it’s not sustainable for anyone.
Exercise also helps get that deficit again because you are burning calories you aren’t putting back in.


Definitely agree with you. Let's forget the exercise though..
Original post by Sati88
Wow, it's like you already know what I'm doing. That makes me feel so much better. Yes to protein, some carbs, 3 meals daily, healthier foods and some treats. The only thing I don't like are vegetables. I think I can live with that. Thank you.

I can reassure you that most people do not like vegetables at all, myself included. I don't struggle with weight as much unfortunately i'm already happy with the way i am (some days i'm not and therefore i push myself to work out as in the long run it will benefit me and i will thank my past self a lot) but when i was suffering from vitamin D deficiency and Iron deficiency, one aspect the medical team took into account was the fact I was not taking in enough vegetables. One way to encourage the intake of vegetables is definitely the benefits, there is a long list of benefits which should encourage you. If its to do with the taste of the vegetables, try different ways on cooking them whether its baking them or boiling them and seasoning will always be your best friend. Try bulking up your meals with vegetables. Usually my parents make sure i eat from a large plate, i would leave 1/3 full of pasta and mostly mince (protein and carb intake) and then bulk it up with lettuce and cucumber and then eat it together so it hides the taste of the lettuce because i hate the taste of lettuce. I hope this has helped you as much as its helped me.
Reply 6
Original post by iwilleatyoursoul
I can reassure you that most people do not like vegetables at all, myself included. I don't struggle with weight as much unfortunately i'm already happy with the way i am (some days i'm not and therefore i push myself to work out as in the long run it will benefit me and i will thank my past self a lot) but when i was suffering from vitamin D deficiency and Iron deficiency, one aspect the medical team took into account was the fact I was not taking in enough vegetables. One way to encourage the intake of vegetables is definitely the benefits, there is a long list of benefits which should encourage you. If its to do with the taste of the vegetables, try different ways on cooking them whether its baking them or boiling them and seasoning will always be your best friend. Try bulking up your meals with vegetables. Usually my parents make sure i eat from a large plate, i would leave 1/3 full of pasta and mostly mince (protein and carb intake) and then bulk it up with lettuce and cucumber and then eat it together so it hides the taste of the lettuce because i hate the taste of lettuce. I hope this has helped you as much as its helped me.


Very interesting, I didn't think eating veg would benefit my health in long term. I will experiment with the methods you suggest. There has to be something I can tolerate. Thanks
Original post by Sati88
Very interesting, I didn't think eating veg would benefit my health in long term. I will experiment with the methods you suggest. There has to be something I can tolerate. Thanks


Another good way to cover the taste of veg is to make sauces so like if you would normally have a bolognaise sauce or a tomato sauce with pasta if you cook some carrots/peppers/courgettes etc and blend them into a paste and add it to the sauce you get loads of nutrients and vitamins and you literally can’t taste it at all. The principle can be applied to anything with a sauce base or even a mince base like a shepherds pie!
Reply 8
Losing weight safely is a long process. For this, you need to choose the right diet that will not harm your body. Now on the Internet you can find a lot of information about it. Also a deficit of calories. In order to lose weight, you need to eat less than 2500 calories a day. But now people are too lazy for this and buy various pills for weight loss in pharmacies, like Canadian pharmacy. I do not recommend this option, but it exists, and it is even insanely effective
(edited 11 months ago)
alright, i'll make this as intelligible as possible. as someone who's researched this extensively for years, i can tell you a few things that i know for sure (no personal assumptions, nothing that hasn't been confirmed by several trustworthy sources, no diet-culture myths):

1) eating less than 2,500 calories, as user Gina871 suggested, may not make you lose weight---hell, if i had 2.5k every day, i'd gain kilos within weeks!! it's generally recommended, in order to lose a pound of fat a week, to eat 500 cals less than your TDEE every day.

2) your TDEE is your total daily energy expenditure: the addition of the calories you burn a day through exercise, fidgeting, etc... and your BMR, or basal metabolic rate. BMR is the calories your body burns at rest (through breathing, heartbeat, brain activity...); essentially, the calories you would burn from lying still in bed all day. online TDEE calculators exist, but it is unique to everyone. it depends on gender, how active you are, your weight... but also your body fat percentage, and of course something no calculator can account for: genetics and individual variety. for example, i'm quite thin and short, but active: my BMR is around 1,300 calories and my TDEE ~300 calories above that. keep in mind this is much lower than the average individual!!

3) you really shouldn't restrict your caloric intake too much. the body adapts to a too-low caloric intake by reducing BMR (by decreasing heart rate and body temperature, for example), slowing weight loss. keeping this in mind, "starvation mode," or weight gain due to metabolic dysfunction from excessively low-calorie dieting, does not exist, no matter how much you may hear it. the true danger of very low caloric intake (aside, of course, from health risks) is that your body tries to make up for being starved by pushing you to crave and consume many calorie-dense foods, undoing progress. the moral of the story is not to starve yourself, and to keep viewing food as something necessary and pleasurable. an unhealthy relationship with food can ruin your life and the life of those around you :/ please be careful and be safe.

4) you can also raise your metabolism short-term!! drinks containing caffeine are effective for that, a few cups a day can make a few dozen calories' difference. i recommend green tea (the teabag goes in when the water is not boiling or it will taste bad) and coffee. spicy foods also have that effect, if you like them (personally i'm in love with them but i know many people can't stomach them!).

5) decreasing the mass of food you take in will result in reduced "water weight" or "water retention." this is the mass of food and water in your digestive tract, adding weight to your weigh-ins. don't panic if you've eaten a lot and see a kilo's gain! no one can gain a kilo of fat overnight, unless they've eaten thousands and thousands of calories---this is simply the weight of the food you haven't evacuated yet. this is especially true if you've had a lot of sodium-heavy (salty) foods, aren't getting enough fibre, or drink too little water. more on that later.

6) all calories are not created equal. some people will tell you "a calorie is a calorie" and "weight loss is just CICO (calories in, calories out)" but unfortunately, that isn't true. fats, carbs, and protein all take energy to digest: that's called the thermic effect of food. this is measured as a percentage: the calories burnt by digestion relative to the calories supplied by the different categories. generally, fats have a thermic effect of 3%, meaning that consuming 100 calories of pure fat would burn, through digestion, 3 calories. carbs (fibre included) have 5-10%, and protein, 25-30%. this is why high-protein dieting is such a staple of weight loss---there really isn't a disadvantage to upping your protein intake.

7) while we're on the subject of protein... it helps keep and build muscle through the weight loss process, which is great, because a calorie deficit will burn muscle as well as fat. now, muscle weighs more than fat. this means that, at the same weight, a more muscular person will have a much slimmer, not to mention more defined, figure. an easy way to increase protein is, of course, to eat lean meat, but also to include protein bars!! personally i like the brands Barebells and Fulfil.

8) and since we're talking about macronutrients, i'd like to mention fibre! while it (being included in carbs) has a low thermal effect, it presents the advantage of being non-digestible. that means it goes straight through the digestive tract and cleanses it, making you, in crude terms, ****. "who cares about that?" you ask. well, it reduces bloating and the aforementioned water weight---not only does your stomach look flatter, but you also get a more accurate number on the scale!

9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo.

10) highly processed foods are stuffed with extra sugars that make them extremely addictive---companies do that on purpose to sell more. glucose sends an easy shot of dopamine to the brain, which is why people with ADHD, depression, and other conditions that stem from a dopamine deficiency are likely to get addicted to sugary foods. if you find yourself eating lots of sugary things without experiencing hunger, this is probably where it comes from. try finding different sources of dopamine, like stroking a purring cat, listening to music, playing video games, finding and playing a sport you enjoy, having an active social life (for extroverted people)... and keep sugar-heavy processed foods out of your house!!

11) despite the misleading name, drinking water actually helps to eliminate water weight in much the same way as fibre, as it is flushed out quickly. on top of that, it keeps you full, holds cravings at bay, and helps with clearer skin! what is there not to love? to figure out how much you should be drinking, try to divide your weight in pounds by 2 and drink that amount in ounces. don't drink too much though, you could overload your kidneys and end up with kidney stones. (this is also why high sodium intake increases water weight---it soaks up the water which would make us un-bloat.)

12) diet pills often just help you flush water weight. most of them don't make you lose real weight at all and can be dangerous!! i'd suggest you do some in-depth research on the functioning of any brand of pills you might consider using. many of them are simply disguised laxatives or diuretics.

that's all for the physical side of it! of course, there's a lot of mental work to do, especially for those who comfort eat, rewarded themselves with food, struggle with binge eating disorders... will for self-improvement in all areas is usually the most effective motivator, not just dissatisfaction with your body. hope i could help <3 good luck and take care of yourselves!!
Original post by chance vibesn't
alright, i'll make this as intelligible as possible. as someone who's researched this extensively for years, i can tell you a few things that i know for sure (no personal assumptions, nothing that hasn't been confirmed by several trustworthy sources, no diet-culture myths):

1) eating less than 2,500 calories, as user Gina871 suggested, may not make you lose weight---hell, if i had 2.5k every day, i'd gain kilos within weeks!! it's generally recommended, in order to lose a pound of fat a week, to eat 500 cals less than your TDEE every day.

2) your TDEE is your total daily energy expenditure: the addition of the calories you burn a day through exercise, fidgeting, etc... and your BMR, or basal metabolic rate. BMR is the calories your body burns at rest (through breathing, heartbeat, brain activity...); essentially, the calories you would burn from lying still in bed all day. online TDEE calculators exist, but it is unique to everyone. it depends on gender, how active you are, your weight... but also your body fat percentage, and of course something no calculator can account for: genetics and individual variety. for example, i'm quite thin and short, but active: my BMR is around 1,300 calories and my TDEE ~300 calories above that. keep in mind this is much lower than the average individual!!

3) you really shouldn't restrict your caloric intake too much. the body adapts to a too-low caloric intake by reducing BMR (by decreasing heart rate and body temperature, for example), slowing weight loss. keeping this in mind, "starvation mode," or weight gain due to metabolic dysfunction from excessively low-calorie dieting, does not exist, no matter how much you may hear it. the true danger of very low caloric intake (aside, of course, from health risks) is that your body tries to make up for being starved by pushing you to crave and consume many calorie-dense foods, undoing progress. the moral of the story is not to starve yourself, and to keep viewing food as something necessary and pleasurable. an unhealthy relationship with food can ruin your life and the life of those around you :/ please be careful and be safe.

4) you can also raise your metabolism short-term!! drinks containing caffeine are effective for that, a few cups a day can make a few dozen calories' difference. i recommend green tea (the teabag goes in when the water is not boiling or it will taste bad) and coffee. spicy foods also have that effect, if you like them (personally i'm in love with them but i know many people can't stomach them!).

5) decreasing the mass of food you take in will result in reduced "water weight" or "water retention." this is the mass of food and water in your digestive tract, adding weight to your weigh-ins. don't panic if you've eaten a lot and see a kilo's gain! no one can gain a kilo of fat overnight, unless they've eaten thousands and thousands of calories---this is simply the weight of the food you haven't evacuated yet. this is especially true if you've had a lot of sodium-heavy (salty) foods, aren't getting enough fibre, or drink too little water. more on that later.

6) all calories are not created equal. some people will tell you "a calorie is a calorie" and "weight loss is just CICO (calories in, calories out)" but unfortunately, that isn't true. fats, carbs, and protein all take energy to digest: that's called the thermic effect of food. this is measured as a percentage: the calories burnt by digestion relative to the calories supplied by the different categories. generally, fats have a thermic effect of 3%, meaning that consuming 100 calories of pure fat would burn, through digestion, 3 calories. carbs (fibre included) have 5-10%, and protein, 25-30%. this is why high-protein dieting is such a staple of weight loss---there really isn't a disadvantage to upping your protein intake.

7) while we're on the subject of protein... it helps keep and build muscle through the weight loss process, which is great, because a calorie deficit will burn muscle as well as fat. now, muscle weighs more than fat. this means that, at the same weight, a more muscular person will have a much slimmer, not to mention more defined, figure. an easy way to increase protein is, of course, to eat lean meat, but also to include protein bars!! personally i like the brands Barebells and Fulfil.

8) and since we're talking about macronutrients, i'd like to mention fibre! while it (being included in carbs) has a low thermal effect, it presents the advantage of being non-digestible. that means it goes straight through the digestive tract and cleanses it, making you, in crude terms, ****. "who cares about that?" you ask. well, it reduces bloating and the aforementioned water weight---not only does your stomach look flatter, but you also get a more accurate number on the scale!

9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo.

10) highly processed foods are stuffed with extra sugars that make them extremely addictive---companies do that on purpose to sell more. glucose sends an easy shot of dopamine to the brain, which is why people with ADHD, depression, and other conditions that stem from a dopamine deficiency are likely to get addicted to sugary foods. if you find yourself eating lots of sugary things without experiencing hunger, this is probably where it comes from. try finding different sources of dopamine, like stroking a purring cat, listening to music, playing video games, finding and playing a sport you enjoy, having an active social life (for extroverted people)... and keep sugar-heavy processed foods out of your house!!

11) despite the misleading name, drinking water actually helps to eliminate water weight in much the same way as fibre, as it is flushed out quickly. on top of that, it keeps you full, holds cravings at bay, and helps with clearer skin! what is there not to love? to figure out how much you should be drinking, try to divide your weight in pounds by 2 and drink that amount in ounces. don't drink too much though, you could overload your kidneys and end up with kidney stones. (this is also why high sodium intake increases water weight---it soaks up the water which would make us un-bloat.)

12) diet pills often just help you flush water weight. most of them don't make you lose real weight at all and can be dangerous!! i'd suggest you do some in-depth research on the functioning of any brand of pills you might consider using. many of them are simply disguised laxatives or diuretics.

that's all for the physical side of it! of course, there's a lot of mental work to do, especially for those who comfort eat, rewarded themselves with food, struggle with binge eating disorders... will for self-improvement in all areas is usually the most effective motivator, not just dissatisfaction with your body. hope i could help <3 good luck and take care of yourselves!!

This is tricky. Some of it is scientifically accurate, but a lot of it is nonsense. Particular highlights for me:

8) and since we're talking about macronutrients, i'd like to mention fibre! while it (being included in carbs) has a low thermal effect, it presents the advantage of being non-digestible. that means it goes straight through the digestive tract and cleanses it, making you, in crude terms, ****. "who cares about that?" you ask. well, it reduces bloating and the aforementioned water weight---not only does your stomach look flatter, but you also get a more accurate number on the scale!

Dietary fibre doesn't 'make your stomach look flatter'; neither does it 'reduce bloating'.

9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo.

This is just nonsense. Do you think they just leak out of your GI tract into your skin and hair and make them oily or something?

11) try to divide your weight in pounds by 2 and drink that amount in ounces. don't drink too much though, you could overload your kidneys and end up with kidney stones.

Evidence for drinking too much water leads to kidney stones?
Reply 11
7) Muscle does not weigh more than fat, it is more dense and you've just proved that by saying of 2 people at the same weight, the more muscular one will be slimmer than the other.

8) Not true. There are 2 kinds of fibre, non-digestable and digestible, the latter being necessary for overall good health.
Original post by Surnia
7) Muscle does not weigh more than fat, it is more dense and you've just proved that by saying of 2 people at the same weight, the more muscular one will be slimmer than the other.

8) Not true. There are 2 kinds of fibre, non-digestable and digestible, the latter being necessary for overall good health.


for the 7, i apologise, i'm not functioning at maximum capacity at the moment and am aware i should have been more careful. as for the 8, i addressed that in my reply to user Reality Check

Original post by Reality Check
This is tricky. Some of it is scientifically accurate, but a lot of it is nonsense. Particular highlights for me:

8) and since we're talking about macronutrients, i'd like to mention fibre! while it (being included in carbs) has a low thermal effect, it presents the advantage of being non-digestible. that means it goes straight through the digestive tract and cleanses it, making you, in crude terms, ****. "who cares about that?" you ask. well, it reduces bloating and the aforementioned water weight---not only does your stomach look flatter, but you also get a more accurate number on the scale!

Dietary fibre doesn't 'make your stomach look flatter'; neither does it 'reduce bloating'.

9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo.

This is just nonsense. Do you think they just leak out of your GI tract into your skin and hair and make them oily or something?

11) try to divide your weight in pounds by 2 and drink that amount in ounces. don't drink too much though, you could overload your kidneys and end up with kidney stones.

Evidence for drinking too much water leads to kidney stones?


"This is tricky. Some of it is scientifically accurate, but a lot of it is nonsense. Particular highlights for me:

"8) and since we're talking about macronutrients, i'd like to mention fibre! while it (being included in carbs) has a low thermal effect, it presents the advantage of being non-digestible. that means it goes straight through the digestive tract and cleanses it, making you, in crude terms, ****. "who cares about that?" you ask. well, it reduces bloating and the aforementioned water weight---not only does your stomach look flatter, but you also get a more accurate number on the scale!

"Dietary fibre doesn't 'make your stomach look flatter'; neither does it 'reduce bloating'."

sorry, i should've specified. fibre helps avoid constipation, as stated by many trusted sources. insoluble fibre holds on to water and makes it easier to pass stool, soluble fibre makes it more solid. it is fact that fibre aids digestion---it can also make you gassy, depending on the person, so it's a bit of a double-edged sword, but a highly important part of a balanced diet either way.

"9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo."

"This is just nonsense. Do you think they just leak out of your GI tract into your skin and hair and make them oily or something?"

my bad---there hasn't been a direct link made as correlation isn't causality. but many studies have suggested it, as detailed by this Healthline article. however, this Yale Scientific page explains there is no scientifically confirmed evidence. thank you for correcting me.

"11) try to divide your weight in pounds by 2 and drink that amount in ounces. don't drink too much though, you could overload your kidneys and end up with kidney stones.

"Evidence for drinking too much water leads to kidney stones?"

holy **** how could i say something like this?? it's not drinking enough water that can cause kidney stones, not the opposite! i need to sleep---and, more importantly, to proof-read better when posting potentially health-impacting information. thank you for your helpful and relevant intervention. i'll go to bed early tonight.
Original post by chance vibesn't
"9) excessive fats of any kind (milk/dairy, oils, anything) make your skin and hair oily. it seems obvious, doesn't it? it's not related to weight loss, but it's really quite a convincing reason to cut back on them a little, at least imo."



There's this research paper:
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21335995/
Which says:

Acne vulgaris, the most common skin disease of western civilization, has evolved to an epidemic affecting more than 85% of adolescents. Acne can be regarded as an indicator disease of exaggerated insulinotropic western nutrition. Especially milk and whey protein-based products...

The essence of what you said, corresponds to this research paper on this topic.

The abstract of that paper ends with:
The elimination of the whey protein-based insulinotropic mechanisms of milk will be the most important future challenge for nutrition research. Both, restriction of milk consumption or generation of less insulinotropic milk will have an enormous impact on the prevention of epidemic western diseases like obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and acne.

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