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Raymond Berry
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#1
Report 17 years ago
#1
Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of
S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to
hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new
initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm told,
it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and more
efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.

Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair
bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.

As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys
or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.

Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?

Regards Raymond
0
Harry The Horse
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#2
Report 17 years ago
#2
"Raymond Berry" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q1]
[q1]> S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to[/q1]
[q1]> hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new[/q1]
[q1]> initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm[/q1]
[q1]> told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and[/q1]
[q1]> more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]> bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]> or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
In my office I switched from lubricating myself with coffee every hour to drinking a litre or more
of fizzy mineral water over the day. Since making that change a few months ago, I think I've noticed
a small increase in my ability to concentrate at the end of the day.

[q1]> Regards Raymond[/q1]
0
Sheila :-D
Badges:
#3
Report 17 years ago
#3
Raymond Berry <[email protected]> gave up looking for Japan in the atlas and posted:

[q1]>Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q1]
[q1]>S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to[/q1]
[q1]> hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new[/q1]
[q1]> initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm[/q1]
[q1]> told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and[/q1]
[q1]> more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]>bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]>or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]

I am prone to headaches. I read that one cause is dehydration. I was only having 2 drinks per day at
school, so I started having a bottle of water by my desk. It helped.

We only have 2 drinking fountains in school, for 200 children, and they freeze or are turned off in
the winter.

We now tell the children to bring in drinks, but they leave them in the lunchbox tub at the back of
the room. The novelty soon wears off and they only drink when they need to.

--
Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)
0
Slieber24
Badges:
#4
Report 17 years ago
#4
In article <[email protected]> , Raymond Berry <[email protected]> writes:

[q1]>Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q1]
[q1]>S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to[/q1]
[q1]> hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new[/q1]
[q1]> initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm[/q1]
[q1]> told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and[/q1]
[q1]> more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]>bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]

Nope. This is based on real research. And, imo, it works.

[q1]>As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]>or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]

Sometimes that's good for concentration. Think about it, how many people do you see in meetings
doodling or playing with a pencil while listening and participating?

[q1]>Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
I've found that with the water bottles, my kids' concentration is much higher in the afternoon. With
behaviour problems down, more learning can be crammed
in.

Of course, at the beginning, toilet trips go up. I have one kid who practically drank his whole
bottle before we start in the morning. I've instituted the "no toilet during class" rule - and no
filling up the bottle during class time, either. They must refill during break and lunch, as well as
use the toilet. The kid has learned to control his drinking.

I have also found that I have had fewer absences this term, after allowing water throughout the day.
It's healthy, considering what they probably eat and drink when not in school!

----------------------------------------------------
Sandi

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Robert
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#5
Report 17 years ago
#5
On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 10:45:53 +0100, Raymond Berry <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]>bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]

You got it in one. If anyone suggests otherwise ask to see the proof.

[q1]>As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]>or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]

Yep thats just one of the downsides. But it gets worse, at a recent inservice day we had two female
members of staff turn up sucking on water bottles. Needless to ssy they were the sensible shoe,
dungaree wearing type of women

[q1]>Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]

If they have a medical note they can have water in class if not, they can wait until the end of the
period like everyone else.
0
Year 5 Teacher
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#6
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#6
Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a difference. We are trying the scheme
in our school as of Monday 17th. We've read/been told that the toilet trips won't last long as the
bladder re-adjusts itself after two weeks! We'll wait and see.

Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested to know how you run
it/how it works.

"Raymond Berry" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q1]
[q1]> S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to[/q1]
[q1]> hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new[/q1]
[q1]> initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm[/q1]
[q1]> told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and[/q1]
[q1]> more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]> bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]> or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Regards Raymond[/q1]
0
Helen
Badges:
#7
Report 17 years ago
#7
Year 5 teacher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a[/q1]
difference.
[q1]> We are trying the scheme in our school as of Monday 17th. We've read/been told that the toilet[/q1]
[q1]> trips won't last long as the bladder re-adjusts[/q1]
itself
[q1]> after two weeks! We'll wait and see.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested[/q1]
to
[q1]> know how you run it/how it works.[/q1]

We do (Yr 2 class). *And* we're in a demountable with no loo! The children who ask to go to the loo
in lesson time are the ones who have always asked (and generally *need*) to go. Our room also gets
extremely warm in summer so I think the water is really a necessity. Any child seen playing with
their bottle is simply told to stop it - no problem :-)

--
Helen
0
Sarah
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#8
Report 17 years ago
#8
We've been doing it for about a year. Novelty soon wears off, and the children take no notice of the
bottles, just drink from them when necessary.Can't say I've noticed a measurable difference in
concentration etc. I have a bright class this year anyway, always keen - don't know if that's down
to H20 or not!

--
Sarah
0
Slieber24
Badges:
#9
Report 17 years ago
#9
In article <[email protected] .net>, [email protected] k (Robert) writes:

[q2]>>Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q2]
[q2]>>bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>You got it in one. If anyone suggests otherwise ask to see the proof.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
One article in TES a few weeks ago and another in American Teacher Magazine about 3 years ago.
Still, try a search on the ERIC database for it. I'm sure you'll find a few articles.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>>As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q2]
[q2]>>or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Yep thats just one of the downsides. But it gets worse, at a recent inservice day we had two female[/q1]
[q1]>members of staff turn up sucking on water bottles. Needless to ssy they were the sensible shoe,[/q1]
[q1]>dungaree wearing type of women[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>>Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>If they have a medical note they can have water in class if not, they can wait until the end of the[/q1]
[q1]>period like everyone else.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
You like shooting yourself in the foot, don't you? ;-)

----------------------------------------------------
Sandi

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Slieber24
Badges:
#10
Report 17 years ago
#10
In article <[email protected] uk>, "Year 5 teacher" <[email protected]> writes:

[q1]>Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a difference. We are trying the[/q1]
[q1]>scheme in our school as of Monday 17th. We've read/been told that the toilet trips won't last long[/q1]
[q1]>as the bladder re-adjusts itself after two weeks! We'll wait and see.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested to know how you run it/how[/q1]
[q1]>it works.[/q1]

I let my kids keep the water bottles on their tables. If they start to play with them (tossing them
about on the table, for example, which could cause spillage), they go to my shelf instead.

My class rules about water are as follows:
1. Fill your bottle before registration and during break and lunch only - not before, not after -
DURING! (same as the toilet rules, btw)
2. No drinking while I'm directly teaching. This rule is for me, rather than for them - I get easily
distracted by constant movement and have told them that this is the reason. They are permitted to
drink as much as they like during independent work at any time of the day (those bottles on the
shelf can go back to the table for independent work times).
3. Anyone abusing the privilege of having water bottles in class will lose such privilege and will
only be permitted water during break, lunch and before/after school.

I've only had to revoke the privilege for a week to one kid to bring home the point.

Oh, for toilet: if the kid drinks his water all in the first 10 minutes and then is busting to use
the loo before the next scheduled break, too bad. One kid finally broke his habit of emptying the
bottle, then going to refill it in the middle of class, etc. (that's the one who lost his privilege
for a week - and prompted the class rules on water bottles).

I also encourage them to wash out the bottle before refilling it each morning, just in case there is
accumulated bacteria.

----------------------------------------------------
Sandi

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User 1951
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#11
Report 17 years ago
#11
On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 10:45:53 +0100, Raymond Berry <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]> Apparently, so I'm told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain[/q1]
[q1]> fully hydrated and more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
It works because the water dilutes the alcohol

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0
Mary Podesta
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#12
Report 17 years ago
#12
Yes we have it too. It's based on new research and yes it is a pain when you first introduce it but
after six weeks the kids are mainly ignoring the bottles or use them unobtrusively.

Mary Podesta [email protected] "Raymond Berry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q1]
[q1]> S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to[/q1]
[q1]> hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new[/q1]
[q1]> initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm[/q1]
[q1]> told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and[/q1]
[q1]> more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q1]
[q1]> bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q1]
[q1]> or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Regards Raymond[/q1]
0
Jenny
Badges:
#13
Report 17 years ago
#13
I'm a student teacher and every class i've been in so far have cups for each child that they can
have a drink if they need to - it's worked well every time.

Jenny
0
Raymond Berry
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#14
Report 17 years ago
#14
In article <[email protected] b-mi.aol.com>, SLieber24 <[email protected]> wrote:
[q1]> In article <[email protected]> , Raymond Berry <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]

[q2]> >Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of S.Yorks, I have been[/q2]
[q2]> >surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep to hand on their[/q2]
[q2]> >tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is a new initiative to[/q2]
[q2]> >help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so I'm told, it has been[/q2]
[q2]> >shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated and more efficient[/q2]
[q2]> >thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q2]
[q2]> >bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q2]

[q1]> Nope. This is based on real research. And, imo, it works.[/q1]

As far as I am aware, this research was centred around office workers who worked in offices which
were hot and dry (modern, insulated buildings?). The office workers would perhaps be at their desks
for up to 3 hours at a stretch. The children in our classrooms are rarely confined for more than an
hour or so without having a break during which they can drink like camels, if they so wish.

Raymond
0
Raymond Berry
Badges:
#15
Report 17 years ago
#15
In article <[email protected] .net>, Robert <[email protected] uk> wrote:
[q1]> On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 10:45:53 +0100, Raymond Berry <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]

[q2]> >Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q2]
[q2]> >bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q2]

[q1]> You got it in one. If anyone suggests otherwise ask to see the proof.[/q1]

[q2]> >As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q2]
[q2]> >or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q2]

[q1]> Yep thats just one of the downsides. But it gets worse, at a recent inservice day we had two[/q1]
[q1]> female members of staff turn up sucking on water bottles.[/q1]

[q1]> Needless to ssy they were the sensible shoe, dungaree wearing type of women[/q1]

That speaks volumes in itself.

Raymond
0
Aph
Badges:
#16
Report 17 years ago
#16
I only let the children use bottles with those special tops to drink out of, to stop spillages. Also
if they need to go to the toilet during lesson time they loose the bottle for the rest of the day -
they soon learn to go to the toilet at playtime whether they think they need it or not!

--
Andrew

"SLieber24" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> In article <[email protected] uk>, "Year 5 teacher" <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a[/q2]
difference.
[q2]> >We are trying the scheme in our school as of Monday 17th. We've[/q2]
read/been
[q2]> >told that the toilet trips won't last long as the bladder re-adjusts[/q2]
itself
[q2]> >after two weeks! We'll wait and see.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested[/q2]
to
[q2]> >know how you run it/how it works.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I let my kids keep the water bottles on their tables. If they start to[/q1]
play
[q1]> with them (tossing them about on the table, for example, which could cause spillage), they go to[/q1]
[q1]> my shelf instead.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> My class rules about water are as follows:[/q1]
[q1]> 1. Fill your bottle before registration and during break and lunch only -[/q1]
not
[q1]> before, not after - DURING! (same as the toilet rules, btw)[/q1]
[q1]> 2. No drinking while I'm directly teaching. This rule is for me, rather[/q1]
than
[q1]> for them - I get easily distracted by constant movement and have told them[/q1]
that
[q1]> this is the reason. They are permitted to drink as much as they like[/q1]
during
[q1]> independent work at any time of the day (those bottles on the shelf can go[/q1]
back
[q1]> to the table for independent work times).[/q1]
[q1]> 3. Anyone abusing the privilege of having water bottles in class will lose[/q1]
such
[q1]> privilege and will only be permitted water during break, lunch and[/q1]
before/after
[q1]> school.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I've only had to revoke the privilege for a week to one kid to bring home[/q1]
the
[q1]> point.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Oh, for toilet: if the kid drinks his water all in the first 10 minutes an[/q1]
d
[q1]> then is busting to use the loo before the next scheduled break, too bad.[/q1]
One
[q1]> kid finally broke his habit of emptying the bottle, then going to refill[/q1]
it in
[q1]> the middle of class, etc. (that's the one who lost his privilege for a[/q1]
week -
[q1]> and prompted the class rules on water bottles).[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I also encourage them to wash out the bottle before refilling it each[/q1]
morning,
[q1]> just in case there is accumulated bacteria.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> ----------------------------------------------------[/q1]
[q1]> Sandi[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Remove NoSpam to reply.[/q1]

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0
Nigel Ford
Badges:
#17
Report 17 years ago
#17
Lots of evidence published in TES Summer 01. I used to get headaches - discovered it was possibly
dehydration ( which is what a hangover is), started drinking more water - no headaches.

Army advice: piss clear daily! You need to drink lots to achieve that.

It also implies respect for the kids - most adults are free to drink as they wish during a
working day.

I was down a working coal-mine recently - there were the miners with bottles of water, (plus
dungarees and sensible shoes, as it happens)!

Nigel

"Harry the Horse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "Raymond Berry" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]> > Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area[/q2]
of
[q2]> > S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles[/q2]
of
[q2]> > water which they keep to hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have[/q2]
[q2]> > told me that this is a new initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more[/q2]
[q2]> > efficiently. Apparently, so I'm told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water[/q2]
[q2]> > keeps the[/q2]
brain
[q2]> > fully hydrated and more efficient thereby enabling the learning process[/q2]
to
[q2]> > be more efficient also.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q2]
[q2]> > bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q2]
[q2]> > or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> In my office I switched from lubricating myself with coffee every hour to drinking a litre or more[/q1]
[q1]> of fizzy mineral water over the day. Since[/q1]
making
[q1]> that change a few months ago, I think I've noticed a small increase in my ability to concentrate[/q1]
[q1]> at the end of the day.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Regards Raymond[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
0
*Ace*
Badges:
#18
Report 17 years ago
#18
Hi Year 5 teacher,

On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 17:05:41 +0100, in uk.education.teachers Year 5 teacher put fingers to keyboard
and tapped away writing...

Message ID:- <[email protected] uk>

[q1]> Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a difference. We are trying the[/q1]
[q1]> scheme in our school as of Monday 17th. We've read/been told that the toilet trips won't last long[/q1]
[q1]> as the bladder re-adjusts itself after two weeks! We'll wait and see.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested to know how you run it/how[/q1]
[q1]> it works.[/q1]

Every child has a labeled cup and we have a drinking tap in every classroom. The children have free
access to water at times convenient to the teacher - i.e. never during carpet sessions but pretty
much any other time.

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Raymond Berry" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]> > Having recently done some supply work in a number of schools in an area of[/q2]
[q2]> > S.Yorks, I have been surprised to find that many children have bottles of water which they keep[/q2]
[q2]> > to hand on their tables. On making enquiries about this,other staff have told me that this is[/q2]
[q2]> > a new initiative to help the children be more alert and learn more efficiently. Apparently, so[/q2]
[q2]> > I'm told, it has been shown that taking frequent sips of water keeps the brain fully hydrated[/q2]
[q2]> > and more efficient thereby enabling the learning process to be more efficient also.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Am I having my leg pulled (I doubt it) or is this another cockeyed idea instigated by some chair[/q2]
[q2]> > bound twerp who is far removed from the chalk-face.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > As you can imagine,the bottles are yet another distraction as they're mainly used as fidget toys[/q2]
[q2]> > or,in many cases,as substitute dummies to be kept in the mouth and sucked on.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Has this latest "aid to learning" manifested itself anywhere else?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Regards Raymond[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]

Best wishes, Ace

==============================

Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide, Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit To his
full height. On, on, you noblest English.
0
Raymond Berry
Badges:
#19
Report 17 years ago
#19
In article <[email protected]>, Helen <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]> Year 5 teacher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected].[/q1]
[q1]> >[/q1]
[q2]> > Having water bottles in the classroom has been proven to make a[/q2]
[q1]> difference.[/q1]
[q2]> > We are trying the scheme in our school as of Monday 17th. We've read/been told that the toilet[/q2]
[q2]> > trips won't last long as the bladder re-adjusts[/q2]
[q1]> itself[/q1]
[q2]> > after two weeks! We'll wait and see.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Any other primary schools have water in classrooms? Would be interested[/q2]
[q1]> to[/q1]
[q2]> > know how you run it/how it works.[/q2]

[q1]> We do (Yr 2 class). *And* we're in a demountable with no loo! The children who ask to go to the[/q1]
[q1]> loo in lesson time are the ones who have always asked (and generally *need*) to go. Our room also[/q1]
[q1]> gets extremely warm in summer so I think the water is really a necessity. Any child seen playing[/q1]
[q1]> with their bottle is simply told to stop it - no problem :-)[/q1]

[q1]> -- Helen[/q1]

Thanks for all the replies. It good to know this isn't just S.Yorks being quirky. Personally, I
think it's a load of codswallop as far as school kids are concerned and just another gimmick.

Raymond
0
Robert
Badges:
#20
Report 17 years ago
#20
On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 18:04:50 +0100, Raymond Berry <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>Thanks for all the replies. It good to know this isn't just S.Yorks being quirky. Personally, I[/q1]
[q1]>think it's a load of codswallop as far as school kids are concerned and just another gimmick.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Raymond[/q1]

And did you notice that the only research anyone was able to come up with was a couple of vague
references to TES articles.

Truth is no one knows what kind of research, how valid etc.

The loony left will soon find another hobby horse and will forget all about water bottles.
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