The Student Room Group

Why is a sediment cell a closed system??

Not sure if this website is made to ask questions like this but one way to find out ig
a closed system has no inputs or outputs but a sediment cell does (input of sediment from waves and output by like idk sediment blowing off the sediment cell). An open system is also something you can enter + exit i think. like you can enter a drainage basin and leave it too. so that means like the water cycle is a closed system bc ur always in it??? but then wouldn't a sediment cell be an open system bc you can enter and exit it (i think, like its just around the coast??) and it has inputs and outputs.
sorry if this sounds stupid
Original post by agreatusername:)
Not sure if this website is made to ask questions like this but one way to find out ig
a closed system has no inputs or outputs but a sediment cell does (input of sediment from waves and output by like idk sediment blowing off the sediment cell). An open system is also something you can enter + exit i think. like you can enter a drainage basin and leave it too. so that means like the water cycle is a closed system bc ur always in it??? but then wouldn't a sediment cell be an open system bc you can enter and exit it (i think, like its just around the coast??) and it has inputs and outputs.
sorry if this sounds stupid


The sediment cells have a system of sources, transfers and sinks. Nothing really leaves or enters the system. E.g. the Holderness Coast.
Source is Flamborough Head where erosion occurs, eroded sediment is transferred/carried across the coastline and it deposits at Spurn Head where a spit is formed.

The sediment deposited at the sink is the sediment that was eroded from the source and was transferred alone the coastline so the sediment cell is a closed system.
Original post by agreatusername:)
Not sure if this website is made to ask questions like this but one way to find out ig
a closed system has no inputs or outputs but a sediment cell does (input of sediment from waves and output by like idk sediment blowing off the sediment cell). An open system is also something you can enter + exit i think. like you can enter a drainage basin and leave it too. so that means like the water cycle is a closed system bc ur always in it??? but then wouldn't a sediment cell be an open system bc you can enter and exit it (i think, like its just around the coast??) and it has inputs and outputs.
sorry if this sounds stupid

To give further clarification and support the answer please kindly watch the video. It has a good explanation so may need to watch it twice.

Coasts: Sediment Budgets | A-level Geography | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVc5gqxi0-I

I hope this helps...
:hello:
Original post by JA03
The sediment cells have a system of sources, transfers and sinks. Nothing really leaves or enters the system. E.g. the Holderness Coast.
Source is Flamborough Head where erosion occurs, eroded sediment is transferred/carried across the coastline and it deposits at Spurn Head where a spit is formed.

The sediment deposited at the sink is the sediment that was eroded from the source and was transferred alone the coastline so the sediment cell is a closed system.

tysm this is rally helpful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Original post by Ambergris
To give further clarification and support the answer please kindly watch the video. It has a good explanation so may need to watch it twice.

Coasts: Sediment Budgets | A-level Geography | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVc5gqxi0-I

I hope this helps...
:hello:


tysm it makes more sense now
Original post by agreatusername:)
tysm this is rally helpful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


No worries! Let me know if you have any more geography related questions and I will do my best to help you.

Quick Reply