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A-level Combination for Cambridge Economics

(Year 12) Im taking maths, further maths and economics and am on track for 3 A*'s. Is it worth applying to Cambridge? What is their policy on further maths as a third subject? I have sent them an email but haven't recieved a response.

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my sister is applying to economics at cam too and takes the exact same subject as you. im pretty sure they are fine with further maths as a third subject.i
Original post by marble arch
my sister is applying to economics at cam too and takes the exact same subject as you. im pretty sure they are fine with further maths as a third subject.i


yeah, i dont really know what their prefered combination is. they say further maths is desired but nothing about it exclusively being a fourth..
Yeah you do the ideal combination. Doesn't matter that you don't have a 4th a level, they won't care
Reply 4
Original post by Labradoodle1
Yeah you do the ideal combination. Doesn't matter that you don't have a 4th a level, they won't care

Actually?! It’s really weird because pembroke admission says that it is a “suitable” combination but I’ve spoke with alumni that say it’s simply not competitive enough. Don’t know what to believe lmao.
Original post by User12367
Actually?! It’s really weird because pembroke admission says that it is a “suitable” combination but I’ve spoke with alumni that say it’s simply not competitive enough. Don’t know what to believe lmao.

Believe the admissions teams. If it was actually disadvantaged, they would say it on their website. Cambridge Engineering discourages further maths as a 3rd a level and they explicitly state this, if Economics did the same they would explicitly state this too.
Reply 6
My son is first year Econ at Cambridge. He says that more people have done 4 A levels than 3, and most, possibly 80% of those who sat A levels in UK, sat Further Maths. Cambridge Econ don’t insist on FM, or require 4 A levels, but he reckons they really do try and find the best fit for the intense, very maths heavy (almost applied maths) course. I’m sure that admissions look at applications holistically and in context of wp, schools etc. Best of luck.
Original post by Cbt33
My son is first year Econ at Cambridge. He says that more people have done 4 A levels than 3, and most, possibly 80% of those who sat A levels in UK, sat Further Maths. Cambridge Econ don’t insist on FM, or require 4 A levels, but he reckons they really do try and find the best fit for the intense, very maths heavy (almost applied maths) course. I’m sure that admissions look at applications holistically and in context of wp, schools etc. Best of luck.


Further maths for cambridge econ does give a very significant advantage, but the 4 a level thing is just correlation not causation, taking 4 a levels does not actually give applicants an advantage over people who have 3
Reply 8
Original post by Labradoodle1
Further maths for cambridge econ does give a very significant advantage, but the 4 a level thing is just correlation not causation, taking 4 a levels does not actually give applicants an advantage over people who have 3


Yep, not making any comment on admissions, just trying to help OP. There are Freedom of Information disclosures that can add to discussion, but basically only advice son would give is if you love your subject then work hard, give it a go, don’t invest everything into getting a place, and be prepared to have to do nothing but work if you do get there! (While watching all your mates have a much more relaxed ‘fun’ time!!)
Original post by Cbt33
Yep, not making any comment on admissions, just trying to help OP. There are Freedom of Information disclosures that can add to discussion, but basically only advice son would give is if you love your subject then work hard, give it a go, don’t invest everything into getting a place, and be prepared to have to do nothing but work if you do get there! (While watching all your mates have a much more relaxed ‘fun’ time!!)


Very good advice from your son!
Original post by Cbt33
Yep, not making any comment on admissions, just trying to help OP. There are Freedom of Information disclosures that can add to discussion, but basically only advice son would give is if you love your subject then work hard, give it a go, don’t invest everything into getting a place, and be prepared to have to do nothing but work if you do get there! (While watching all your mates have a much more relaxed ‘fun’ time!!)

Some students must manage to fit other things in with their studies. Over 1300 people rowed in last year's May Bumps, with the vast majority of those being undergraduates. Similarly there are many college and university orchestras and choirs involving a large number of students.
Original post by Cbt33
Yep, not making any comment on admissions, just trying to help OP. There are Freedom of Information disclosures that can add to discussion, but basically only advice son would give is if you love your subject then work hard, give it a go, don’t invest everything into getting a place, and be prepared to have to do nothing but work if you do get there! (While watching all your mates have a much more relaxed ‘fun’ time!!)


would you reccommend applying then?
Reply 12
Original post by AcademicWeapon12
would you reccommend applying then?


Of course! Why not? As long as you love the subject you choose and you love challenges it’s always worth giving things a go. There are other brilliant Econ courses out there too. There are far more talented students than there are places at Oxbridge, so it’s good to have a range of options.

I have twins who both applied to Cambridge. One got a place, one didn’t, they are both happy and thriving and feel they are at the right places for them.

And yes, there are obviously loads of extra curricular options. Some do tend to be dominated by humanities students simply because their time tables are more flexible. I think it’s NatSci or Engineers who can’t really do team sports because they have all lectures on Wednesdays when games are, and I think they or another STEM subject have Sat morning lectures too.

Best of luck with your application!

Ps I am a state school student who studied at Oxford years ago- I do think workload has increased all round since my time.
Original post by Cbt33
Of course! Why not? As long as you love the subject you choose and you love challenges it’s always worth giving things a go. There are other brilliant Econ courses out there too. There are far more talented students than there are places at Oxbridge, so it’s good to have a range of options.

I have twins who both applied to Cambridge. One got a place, one didn’t, they are both happy and thriving and feel they are at the right places for them.

And yes, there are obviously loads of extra curricular options. Some do tend to be dominated by humanities students simply because their time tables are more flexible. I think it’s NatSci or Engineers who can’t really do team sports because they have all lectures on Wednesdays when games are, and I think they or another STEM subject have Sat morning lectures too.

Best of luck with your application!

Ps I am a state school student who studied at Oxford years ago- I do think workload has increased all round since my time.

I did NatSci at Cambridge and played games. They're not mutually exclusive. Saturday lectures are more a Part IA thing, i.e. first year.

@Saracen's Fez
Original post by Reality Check
I did NatSci at Cambridge and played games. They're not mutually exclusive. Saturday lectures are more a Part IA thing, i.e. first year.

@Saracen's Fez


Yep, one of the engineers in my year and college played uni men's rugby and Varsity matches, which is about as serious as Cambridge sport gets, short of the Boat Race.

No subject at Cambridge guarantees Wednesday afternoons off but sport is set up with this in mind.
(edited 11 months ago)
maybe @Oxford Mum has a chapter on applying to economics in her Oxford idemystified book? I know its not Cambridge but would still be helpful!
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 16
Original post by Reality Check
I did NatSci at Cambridge and played games. They're not mutually exclusive. Saturday lectures are more a Part IA thing, i.e. first year.

@Saracen's Fez


That’s good to hear. I think my son was saying it was just harder for some. And his mates are definitely looking forward to getting their Saturday mornings back in due course!
Original post by Cbt33
That’s good to hear. I think my son was saying it was just harder for some. And his mates are definitely looking forward to getting their Saturday mornings back in due course!

Yes - and your son is of course right about that. I bet they are looking forward to no Saturday lectures! Having had Saturday lessons throughout my schooling, I was dismayed to find them at IA Natsci too, but at least they're just a year!
Reply 18
Original post by Saracen's Fez
Yep, one of the engineers in my year and college played uni men's rugby and Varsity matches, which is about as serious as Cambridge sport gets, short of the Boat Race.

No subject at Cambridge guarantees Wednesday afternoons off but sport is set up with this in mind.


That’s great. I do appreciate it’s possible, just harder.

Aiming for Oxbridge is great, I just always try to encourage applicants to look at the advantages of going to other universities if that’s what happens. It’s really tough in January when Oxbridge results come through and some applicants see broken hearted!
Reply 19
Original post by Reality Check
Yes - and your son is of course right about that. I bet they are looking forward to no Saturday lectures! Having had Saturday lessons throughout my schooling, I was dismayed to find them at IA Natsci too, but at least they're just a year!


Lordy, I can imagine your disappointment. My kids were schooled in Australia for 4 years of secondary school and Saturdays were for compulsory sport for all! That’s the way to do it really. It was notable that there was no dissent, and all the kids loved it. Quite a different culture. I suspect Saturday academic school would have been quite a different matter…

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