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romeo and juliet

how does shakespeare present juliet as a tragic character?
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Original post by j.e.s.s.i.c.a
how does shakespeare present juliet as a tragic character?


Shakespeare presents Juliet as a tragic character in several ways throughout Romeo and Juliet. Here are a few examples:

1) Juliet is trapped in a conflict between her family and her love for Romeo. She is forced to choose between obeying her family's wishes and marrying Paris, or following her heart and eloping with Romeo. This conflict creates a sense of inevitability about her tragic fate.

2) Juliet's impulsive nature leads her to make rash decisions that ultimately contribute to her tragic end. For example, she agrees to marry Romeo after only knowing him for a short time, and she takes the potion that Friar Laurence gives her without fully considering the consequences.

3) Juliet's youth and innocence make her vulnerable to the events that unfold around her. She is just thirteen years old, and has little experience with the complexities of love and marriage. Her innocence and naivete contribute to the tragedy that befalls her.

4) Shakespeare also uses dramatic irony to create a sense of tragedy around Juliet's character. The audience knows that Romeo is not really dead when Juliet awakens from her drug-induced sleep, but she believes that he is and ultimately takes her own life.

Overall, Shakespeare presents Juliet as a tragic character who is caught up in circumstances beyond her control. Her youth, innocence, and impulsive nature contribute to her tragic end, as does the conflict between her family and her love for Romeo.

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