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Cambridge to study law

Hi everyone! I’m currently a sixth form student studying the A-levels of history, politics, and sociology. I hope to apply to LSE and possibly Cambridge if I get the predicted grades of A*A*A at least which I’m currently on track to meet. I think the A will be from history though as one unit I’m weaker on than the other unit. My gcses are lower than my targets for a level and I was wondering if that would limit me as I’ve done a lot of supercurriculars (around 18-20) and of which 3 I’ve done with Cambridge - residential law conference, masterclass for law and caius 12 programme. My gcses were 6-9s where I got 9s in religious studies and Turkish, 7s in media and English language and 6s for maths, art, geography, combined science and English lit. Do you think it would prevent me from possibly getting a good offer if I was to have good predicted and a strong lnat/ps? I am also on programmes like pathways to law lse/ Durham supported progression/ lse explore/ and have done physical work experience with barristers/read around law and virtual with law firms.
Original post by Hailey629
Hi everyone! I’m currently a sixth form student studying the A-levels of history, politics, and sociology. I hope to apply to LSE and possibly Cambridge if I get the predicted grades of A*A*A at least which I’m currently on track to meet. I think the A will be from history though as one unit I’m weaker on than the other unit. My gcses are lower than my targets for a level and I was wondering if that would limit me as I’ve done a lot of supercurriculars (around 18-20) and of which 3 I’ve done with Cambridge - residential law conference, masterclass for law and caius 12 programme. My gcses were 6-9s where I got 9s in religious studies and Turkish, 7s in media and English language and 6s for maths, art, geography, combined science and English lit. Do you think it would prevent me from possibly getting a good offer if I was to have good predicted and a strong lnat/ps? I am also on programmes like pathways to law lse/ Durham supported progression/ lse explore/ and have done physical work experience with barristers/read around law and virtual with law firms.


No definitely not! I just got an offer from Cambridge and they said GCSEs only make up one part of what they take into consideration, and your predicted grades and super curriculars are just as important-probably more!
Hope this helps, and best of luck with your applications! :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by average_human
No definitely not! I just got an offer from Cambridge and they said GCSEs only make up one part of what they take into consideration, and your predicted grades and super curriculars are just as important-probably more!
Hope this helps, and best of luck with your applications! :smile:

Thank you so much and congrats on the offer. I’m predicting I will get predicted A*A*A and do you think that’s still weak as I feel like most tend to be even stronger with A*s only. I am trying to increase some physical work experience with law firms and have more things in the summer but I just want to make myself as strong as possible. Would you have any advice?
Original post by Hailey629
Thank you so much and congrats on the offer. I’m predicting I will get predicted A*A*A and do you think that’s still weak as I feel like most tend to be even stronger with A*s only. I am trying to increase some physical work experience with law firms and have more things in the summer but I just want to make myself as strong as possible. Would you have any advice?


As long as you meet the minimum entry requirements, I wouldn't say having 3 A*s is much of an advantage compared to A*A*A at all-your personal statement and admissions test (if you do them?) would be much more important than having that extra A*.

Work experience is great! As well, I remember hearing Cambridge put a lot of emphasis on super curriculars because they recognise not everyone will have had access to the same work opportunities [but still definitely include these in your application]-so reading around your subject, and essay competitions are really good for this! I only started reading for my personal statement around July time, but sounds like you've done some amazing things already!
My advice would be in terms of personal statement, write what you're genuinely interested in, even if it's very niche. one of our law teachers wanted to ban people's main book from being the Secret Barrister lol :smile: [which is not a bad book, but you won't really stand out]
and try and pester your teachers to give you feedback on personal statements-they've had loads of experience with it

good luck :smile:
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by average_human
As long as you meet the minimum entry requirements, I wouldn't say having 3 A*s is much of an advantage compared to A*A*A at all-your personal statement and admissions test (if you do them?) would be much more important than having that extra A*.

Work experience is great! As well, I remember hearing Cambridge put a lot of emphasis on super curriculars because they recognise not everyone will have had access to the same work opportunities [but still definitely include these in your application]-so reading around your subject, and essay competitions are really good for this! I only started reading for my personal statement around July time, but sounds like you've done some amazing things already!
My advice would be in terms of personal statement, write what you're genuinely interested in, even if it's very niche. one of our law teachers wanted to ban people's main book from being the Secret Barrister lol :smile: [which is not a bad book, but you won't really stand out]
and try and pester your teachers to give you feedback on personal statements-they've had loads of experience with it

good luck :smile:


Thank you very much all this help and advice is so useful! I have tried to get ahead with all the super curriculars etc and I could imagine how many people read the secret barrister. I am currently reading in black and white and previously read You are what you read and it focused on news and how what we are exposed to can influence our beliefs and views in society like wars happening and poverty but in reality it has gotten better. Do you think this could be a book to mention as it links to society and I guess how it can be controlled through the news rather than the law? Or would you recommend sticking to law related books more? I also have some physical work experience in summer with 2 chambers one being a mini-pupillage and one being on my work experience week. Alongside with 3 residentials 1 being at Cambridge in 2 weeks and the other 2 at Durham.
Original post by Hailey629
Hi everyone! I’m currently a sixth form student studying the A-levels of history, politics, and sociology. I hope to apply to LSE and possibly Cambridge if I get the predicted grades of A*A*A at least which I’m currently on track to meet. I think the A will be from history though as one unit I’m weaker on than the other unit. My gcses are lower than my targets for a level and I was wondering if that would limit me as I’ve done a lot of supercurriculars (around 18-20) and of which 3 I’ve done with Cambridge - residential law conference, masterclass for law and caius 12 programme. My gcses were 6-9s where I got 9s in religious studies and Turkish, 7s in media and English language and 6s for maths, art, geography, combined science and English lit. Do you think it would prevent me from possibly getting a good offer if I was to have good predicted and a strong lnat/ps? I am also on programmes like pathways to law lse/ Durham supported progression/ lse explore/ and have done physical work experience with barristers/read around law and virtual with law firms.

Work experience is not relevant for the academic study of law per se: it's only useful if it makes you think deeper about a particular area of the law you've seen practised.

If you're asking here whether the GCSEs will be a hindrance, the answer is (probably) no. A*A*A or higher, a good LNAT and a good interview are the key parts of your application. In fact, an obvious academic progression from relatively mediocre GCSEs to stellar A levels is always seen as A Good Thing.
Original post by Hailey629
Thank you very much all this help and advice is so useful! I have tried to get ahead with all the super curriculars etc and I could imagine how many people read the secret barrister. I am currently reading in black and white and previously read You are what you read and it focused on news and how what we are exposed to can influence our beliefs and views in society like wars happening and poverty but in reality it has gotten better. Do you think this could be a book to mention as it links to society and I guess how it can be controlled through the news rather than the law? Or would you recommend sticking to law related books more? I also have some physical work experience in summer with 2 chambers one being a mini-pupillage and one being on my work experience week. Alongside with 3 residentials 1 being at Cambridge in 2 weeks and the other 2 at Durham.

Note the above with this - a lot of what you've written about is tinsel, and doesn't carry much weight. Remember that many applicants are not able to access these opportunities such as a ?mini pupillage, residentials etc so Cambridge puts very little value on them. You can make a stronger application by not creating a list of books that you've read, but thinking about what you've read - thinking deeply. If you find an area of the law you're particularly interested in, then do some focussed, targeted reading about that to stimulate your thinking.

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