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Foundation year with an Uni and the degree itself with another

I was wondering if I can apply for a Dietetics with foundation year to another university and at the end of the foundation to transfer myself to the another university? I live in London, and the only university in London that has an undergraduate program in Dietetics is London Met University, they wouldn't accept me because I have no sufficient A-levels in Biology and Chemistry and I have found another university outside London, not very far that have the same program but with foundation year. I don't want to waste another year and I was thinking if I apply to this uni that also offers a foundation year can I transfer myself later to London Met? If yes, which are the procedures, do I get any qualifications after I finish the foundation year in Dietetics? Thank you in advance.
Original post by Joana95
I was wondering if I can apply for a Dietetics with foundation year to another university and at the end of the foundation to transfer myself to the another university? I live in London, and the only university in London that has an undergraduate program in Dietetics is London Met University, they wouldn't accept me because I have no sufficient A-levels in Biology and Chemistry and I have found another university outside London, not very far that have the same program but with foundation year. I don't want to waste another year and I was thinking if I apply to this uni that also offers a foundation year can I transfer myself later to London Met? If yes, which are the procedures, do I get any qualifications after I finish the foundation year in Dietetics? Thank you in advance.

A foundation year does not deliver a qualification which can be used to gain entry to a degree programme. They are not designed to be used as "currency" in this way. However, some universities will allow you to use them to gain entry to their degree programme.

If you look at London Met's "Dietetics - BSc (Hons)" page, here, you will note that it says, "Science foundation and access courses will be considered". So it seems as though this approach could be a viable option. It would be worth contacting the admissions team and see if there are any requirements of the foundation course. For example, modules it must contain or a mark/grade you must achieve.

An alternative approach would be to apply for a similar course at London Met which does have a foundation year, and then transfer courses part-way through. That approach is described on that same page:

"If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) degree.

Students are required to apply internally for Dietetics BSc and Dietetics and Nutrition BSc during their studies on Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc. There will be support and advice during this process.

Students are then required to pass all modules without reassessment with an average mark of 65%."

(Actually that top paragraph is from their "Dietetics and Nutrition - BSc (Hons)" page, but the rest looks the same.)

In fact, it looks like you can't actually complete the "Human Nutrition (including foundation year)" degree - it's designed to be an alternative route to "Dietetics" or "Dietetics and Nutrition":

"Our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc course is designed to enable you to enter an undergraduate degree if you don’t hold traditional qualifications or can’t meet the necessary requirements to enter the standard three-year degree. On completion of this four-year programme you’ll graduate with the same academic title and award as students who enter the standard human nutrition course."

That route seems tailor-made for your scenario. :smile:
Original post by DataVenia
A foundation year does not deliver a qualification which can be used to gain entry to a degree programme. They are not designed to be used as "currency" in this way. However, some universities will allow you to use them to gain entry to their degree programme.

If you look at London Met's "Dietetics - BSc (Hons)" page, here, you will note that it says, "Science foundation and access courses will be considered". So it seems as though this approach could be a viable option. It would be worth contacting the admissions team and see if there are any requirements of the foundation course. For example, modules it must contain or a mark/grade you must achieve.

An alternative approach would be to apply for a similar course at London Met which does have a foundation year, and then transfer courses part-way through. That approach is described on that same page:

"If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) degree.

Students are required to apply internally for Dietetics BSc and Dietetics and Nutrition BSc during their studies on Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc. There will be support and advice during this process.

Students are then required to pass all modules without reassessment with an average mark of 65%."

(Actually that top paragraph is from their "Dietetics and Nutrition - BSc (Hons)" page, but the rest looks the same.)

In fact, it looks like you can't actually complete the "Human Nutrition (including foundation year)" degree - it's designed to be an alternative route to "Dietetics" or "Dietetics and Nutrition":

"Our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc course is designed to enable you to enter an undergraduate degree if you don’t hold traditional qualifications or can’t meet the necessary requirements to enter the standard three-year degree. On completion of this four-year programme you’ll graduate with the same academic title and award as students who enter the standard human nutrition course."

That route seems tailor-made for your scenario. :smile:

Wonderful post as always DV :wink:
Reply 3
Original post by DataVenia
A foundation year does not deliver a qualification which can be used to gain entry to a degree programme. They are not designed to be used as "currency" in this way. However, some universities will allow you to use them to gain entry to their degree programme.

If you look at London Met's "Dietetics - BSc (Hons)" page, here, you will note that it says, "Science foundation and access courses will be considered". So it seems as though this approach could be a viable option. It would be worth contacting the admissions team and see if there are any requirements of the foundation course. For example, modules it must contain or a mark/grade you must achieve.

An alternative approach would be to apply for a similar course at London Met which does have a foundation year, and then transfer courses part-way through. That approach is described on that same page:

"If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) degree.

Students are required to apply internally for Dietetics BSc and Dietetics and Nutrition BSc during their studies on Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc. There will be support and advice during this process.

Students are then required to pass all modules without reassessment with an average mark of 65%."

(Actually that top paragraph is from their "Dietetics and Nutrition - BSc (Hons)" page, but the rest looks the same.)

In fact, it looks like you can't actually complete the "Human Nutrition (including foundation year)" degree - it's designed to be an alternative route to "Dietetics" or "Dietetics and Nutrition":

"Our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc course is designed to enable you to enter an undergraduate degree if you don’t hold traditional qualifications or can’t meet the necessary requirements to enter the standard three-year degree. On completion of this four-year programme you’ll graduate with the same academic title and award as students who enter the standard human nutrition course."

That route seems tailor-made for your scenario. :smile:


Thank you for your reply. I know this stuff, but the only problem is that I will not have funding for the Human Nutrition Foundation year. I already have a degree and Human Nutrition is not part of the Medicine and allied subjects. London Met offered me a place for the foundation year, but I can’t attend it as I have no viable way to pay for it. I was thinking for alternative solutions, but so far nothing. An Access course in Science would have been useful, but all the course providers will not deliver the results until November. If you have knowledge of a fast track Access course related to my degree, please, let me know.
Thank you once again for your help.
Original post by Joana95
Thank you for your reply. I know this stuff, but the only problem is that I will not have funding for the Human Nutrition Foundation year. I already have a degree and Human Nutrition is not part of the Medicine and allied subjects. London Met offered me a place for the foundation year, but I can’t attend it as I have no viable way to pay for it. I was thinking for alternative solutions, but so far nothing. An Access course in Science would have been useful, but all the course providers will not deliver the results until November. If you have knowledge of a fast track Access course related to my degree, please, let me know.
Thank you once again for your help.

Understood. Sorry, I'm unable to help further.
Original post by Joana95
Thank you for your reply. I know this stuff, but the only problem is that I will not have funding for the Human Nutrition Foundation year. I already have a degree and Human Nutrition is not part of the Medicine and allied subjects. London Met offered me a place for the foundation year, but I can’t attend it as I have no viable way to pay for it. I was thinking for alternative solutions, but so far nothing. An Access course in Science would have been useful, but all the course providers will not deliver the results until November. If you have knowledge of a fast track Access course related to my degree, please, let me know.
Thank you once again for your help.

If you already have a degree then a foundation year or access diploma wouldn’t be ideal anyway.

Take A levels in chemistry and biology and get your results by august 2024. or speak to London Met about whether they’ll accept OU modules as an alternative.

The route you’re looking at will eat into your finance and is highly risky.
Reply 6
Original post by PQ
If you already have a degree then a foundation year or access diploma wouldn’t be ideal anyway.

Take A levels in chemistry and biology and get your results by august 2024. or speak to London Met about whether they’ll accept OU modules as an alternative.

The route you’re looking at will eat into your finance and is highly risky.

I was thinking about taking the A levels in Biology and Chemistry, the only problem is that I am afraid I will not get the required marks and the entry fees are quite expensive for this time of the year and I will be sorry for Both losing money and the place at the University. I had a look on the Chemistry units/ content and it is a bit complicated as the majority of these I have studied in 6th and 7th grade, in my country this is the time when you study these Chemistry subjects, and is a long time since then, I was 13 years and now I am 27. For the Biology is fine as I have always loved it and had High grades. The Chemistry scares me, but I have started to study already. Hopefully I will be able to have everything in my head by the exam date.
Btw, Why don’t you recommend the Access Course?

Thank you for your help.
Original post by Joana95
I was thinking about taking the A levels in Biology and Chemistry, the only problem is that I am afraid I will not get the required marks and the entry fees are quite expensive for this time of the year and I will be sorry for Both losing money and the place at the University. I had a look on the Chemistry units/ content and it is a bit complicated as the majority of these I have studied in 6th and 7th grade, in my country this is the time when you study these Chemistry subjects, and is a long time since then, I was 13 years and now I am 27. For the Biology is fine as I have always loved it and had High grades. The Chemistry scares me, but I have started to study already. Hopefully I will be able to have everything in my head by the exam date.
Btw, Why don’t you recommend the Access Course?

Thank you for your help.

You don't have to enter for this year - use the "foundation year" to study and take the exams next summer.

An Access to HE Diploma is designed for students without level 3 study to build their academic skills up for university entry - you have a degree, a level 6 qualification. Moving back down to a course that bridges from level 2 to level 3 wouldn't be a sensible option.
Reply 8
Original post by PQ
You don't have to enter for this year - use the "foundation year" to study and take the exams next summer.

An Access to HE Diploma is designed for students without level 3 study to build their academic skills up for university entry - you have a degree, a level 6 qualification. Moving back down to a course that bridges from level 2 to level 3 wouldn't be a sensible option.

Thank you for your help. To study for the A levels is the only viable option so far.

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