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What is jury behaviour?

What is jury behaviour? and how is it explained by psychologists?
Reply 1
Jury behavior refers to the actions, attitudes, and decision-making processes of a group of people selected to serve as jurors in a legal trial. Psychologists believe that jury behavior is influenced by various factors. They use the following theories to explain jury behavior.
Social influence: This theory suggests that individual jurors may conform to the opinions of the group or be influenced by the more vocal or persuasive members of the group.

Group polarization: This theory suggests that group discussion can lead to a more extreme verdict than the initial individual opinions of jurors. This phenomenon can occur because individuals tend to seek out information that confirms their preexisting beliefs and opinions.

Cognitive biases: Research has shown that jurors are susceptible to a range of cognitive biases, such as confirmation bias, where they tend to seek out information that confirms their preexisting beliefs, and the halo effect, where jurors may be influenced by their overall impression of a witness or defendant.

Emotional factors: Jurors' emotional reactions to the evidence presented in court, such as sympathy or disgust, can influence their decision-making.
Original post by Carol 202i
Jury behavior refers to the actions, attitudes, and decision-making processes of a group of people selected to serve as jurors in a legal trial. Psychologists believe that jury behavior is influenced by various factors. They use the following theories to explain jury behavior.
Social influence: This theory suggests that individual jurors may conform to the opinions of the group or be influenced by the more vocal or persuasive members of the group.

Group polarization: This theory suggests that group discussion can lead to a more extreme verdict than the initial individual opinions of jurors. This phenomenon can occur because individuals tend to seek out information that confirms their preexisting beliefs and opinions.

Cognitive biases: Research has shown that jurors are susceptible to a range of cognitive biases, such as confirmation bias, where they tend to seek out information that confirms their preexisting beliefs, and the halo effect, where jurors may be influenced by their overall impression of a witness or defendant.

Emotional factors: Jurors' emotional reactions to the evidence presented in court, such as sympathy or disgust, can influence their decision-making.

where did you find this info?

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