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Picking a course for my career

I have 2 years of experience in IT as a developer and I am planning to do supply chain management as my masters in the UK is this a good choice? will I get jobs and will my experience be considered??
Original post by harshi_219
I have 2 years of experience in IT as a developer and I am planning to do supply chain management as my masters in the UK is this a good choice? will I get jobs and will my experience be considered??


Hi @harshi_219,

In my experience, whether you get a job or not is about more than the degree programme that you do.

This is not to say that the degree choice is unimportant - certain jobs may require you to have specific academic qualifications - but getting a job is about the way in which you market the skills and experiences you have gained during the degree programme (and any associated work experience or extra-curricular activities) to prospective employers. Remember: many of the skills and experiences gained in a degree are not directly related to subject content but are more to do with the process and methodology of studying a subject at a higher level.

Getting a Masters in Supply Chain Management will almost certainly give you subject specific knowledge of that particular sector. So it will probably give you an advantage over applicants without that knowledge when it comes to applying for jobs. But you'll still need to demonstrate to employers how you meet the criteria in their job specification by outlining the specific skills and knowledge that you possess. Having a degree - even a masters degree - won't do that in and of itself, although you will certainly gain both specific and more widely transferable skills by completing a masters programme.

Take a look at job adverts for the kinds of jobs that you want to apply for when you finish your masters programme. What qualifications are they asking for? What sort of skills and experience do they want? Has your current employment already given you some of these skills/experiences? Will the masters programme you are applying to provide you with the necessary qualifications/skills/experiences that you currently don't have? Asking these questions should help you decide whether the course you are considering is the best one for helping you to fulfil your longer terms goals.

You say you've been working for 2 years but you may still have access to careers support from your previous university as an alumni. Many universities continue to offer careers support to their graduates for several years after graduation. If this is an option, consider arranging to speak with a careers advisor as they can help you assess the skills and experiences you have undoubtedly gained from your current employment, and to review your options for changing careers and moving into further study.

Hope that helps!

Amy Louise
Student Ambassador, Keele University
(edited 1 year ago)

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