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Mechanic HW

A mass is attached to the lower end of a vertical light inelastic string. The mass is given a horizontal velocity of 5 ms-1.

The greatest height of the mass is Answer
Original post by i.toqeer
A mass is attached to the lower end of a vertical light inelastic string. The mass is given a horizontal velocity of 5 ms-1.

The greatest height of the mass is Answer

Is the inelastic string like a pendulum with a decreased height after every single oscillation?

My idea is to find the height out by an equation of kinetic energy (KE) and potential energy (PE), as both kinds of energy are involved in the oscillation of a pendulum.

KE = PE
0,5m*v^2 = m*g*h

The conversion of this equation to the height leads to: h = v^2/2g

A sketch to it - if in existence - would be helpful.
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 2
Thank you
Original post by i.toqeer
Thank you


You are welcome. Just good to know that the attempt with energies works here. The physical meaning behind this equation is that the kinetic energy is converted to potential energy at the highest point. Thus potential energy has the same amount at that level.
Reply 4
Original post by Kallisto
Is the inelastic string like a pendulum with a decreased height after every single oscillation?

My idea is to find the height out by an equation of kinetic energy (KE) and potential energy (PE), as both kinds of energy are involved in the oscillation of a pendulum.

KE = PE


I'd stop there with the hint ... no evidence the OP has tried the question. The forum rules state they have to post what they've tried ...

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