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law with international business

hello ! I am currently a first year college student and i study A-level business, A-level Textiles and Btech extended certificate in I.T. i gained interest in international business during my business classes and wish to pursue a solicitor career in it by doing law with international business. My main concern is, are my courses at college okay to help me get into this course?
thank you!!
Original post by issheza
hello ! I am currently a first year college student and i study A-level business, A-level Textiles and Btech extended certificate in I.T. i gained interest in international business during my business classes and wish to pursue a solicitor career in it by doing law with international business. My main concern is, are my courses at college okay to help me get into this course?
thank you!!

I get a little annoyed with these sort of questions. However, I am not working in law nor did I do a law degree.

Things I think you should know:

You don't need a law degree to become a solicitor (you need to do the SQE, which requires an undergrad in any subject)

If the degree is not your thing, you can do CILEx up to level 6 (there are only 2 levels), which would equate to a degree

I seriously don't think you will benefit much from doing a business degree, but then again I am not the one doing the degree

Law and/or business degrees generally do not have any subject specific entry requirements (they usually accept anything under the sun so long they are of the right grade, but some of the pickier universities might ask for the more academic subjects and qualifications e.g. A Levels in any science, maths, etc - you will need to look at the entry requirements for the specific degrees to be sure)

A Level Textiles is not really "academic" and BTECs aren't generally "academic"

You definitely do not need a degree in business to go into any part of business (at least in most areas of the world - I only know of the US where you must do a predominantly accounting degree in order to go into accounting there, but there is no such requirement anywhere else in the world).

You would never need to do anything above the equivalent of a bachelor's in law for anything in industry

Master's in business related subjects (I don't recommend them unless you want to go into academia) generally accept undergrads in any subjects, even if it's in international business

Business degrees generally teach you business theory, and even then it won't give you everything you need e.g. they don't teach you how to sell, what to do in crises, how to set up a business in the UK

You can often pick up a lot of the material that you find in business degrees outside of university e.g. A Level Business studies


When looking into whether your courses are suitable for the course, you should look into the entry requirements for the specific course that you want to do first (not doing the subjects then ask whether they are suitable later on).

Looking at the list of qualified LLB degrees (law degrees at bachelor's level), only Northumbria offers something that is akin to Law with International Business (as opposed to International Business Law, which just looks into law for business): https://www.sra.org.uk/become-solicitor/legal-practice-course-route/qualifying-law-degree-common-professional-examination/qualifying-law-degree-providers/
However, looking at Northumbria's website for the degree, it seems the course is discontinued for some reason (and that the SRA website needs updating).

Doing a quick google search, it seems an LLB in Law with International Business is only available at the University of Law, and it seems your subjects should be fine for the degree so long you get the right grades: https://www.law.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/law/llb-hons-law-with-international-business/ (you will need to check with the university to be sure). Most Law with International Business courses tend to be LLMs i.e. master's degrees.

The main difference between an LLB and a BA/BSc (or LLM and MA/MSc) is that the former has enough law content to be considered a qualifying law degree (but you should still check with the SRA or similar for confirmation). whereas the latter doesn't. If you want to later become a barrister or do a master's in law for any reason, you would likely be looking to have to do a postgrad law conversion diploma (PGDL) if your degree does not have enough law content.

I don't see much difference between a degree in business and international business, with the exception of a few modules. Whether you should go with a degree in international business is a matter of your opinion.
A further note about business degrees in general is that it's generally a repeat of A Level business studies. You can ask other people for a second opinion, but you generally don't learn anything new at university for business (either at bachelor's or master's level). Having said that, it doesn't mean that there's nothing more to learn about business, but I don't think you would generally be able to get what you need through degrees.

My recommendation (do note of my biases) is to:

Do a degree of your choice (but it's not recommended to be a business degree; I recommend something that's required by industry such as most things in healthcare, but that's just me)

Do the SQE afterwards, and hopefully specialise in corporate law (if your law firm would allow you to choose your specialism, and they often don't)

If you do decide to do a law degree, make sure it's an LLB to save you potential headaches

If you want to study anything related to business, do it outside of university

If by some weird reason you want to do a master's in international business, a law undergrad is sufficient to get you onto the course provided it's of a high enough grade (law undergrad degrees are difficult just for the heads up) but generally the undergrad can be in any subject

If you want to shortcut the entire process (but miss out on the degree), do CILEx up to level 6 and then do the SQE; study anything related to business in your spare time

If for some weird reason you want to do an LLM in international business and law, then I recommend doing a law undergrad to meet the strictest entry requirements (as I have researched, only a handful of universities would accept undergrad degrees in any subjects)

For more information on becoming a solicitor, see:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/solicitor
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/law/job-profile/solicitor
(edited 1 year ago)

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