Is Art a "doss subject"? Watch

Poll: Is Art a "dos subject"?
Yes (54)
26.09%
No (153)
73.91%
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katieclick
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#41
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#41
art is definitely not a doss, it's the most stressful subject i ever did. and now i'm doing photography at degree level, i love it to pieces but it's still very stressful, i have the biggest workload out of everyone in my flat
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kultist
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#42
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#42
Only took it at GCSE and it wasn't at all a doss back then. It was a ***** of a subject. For the most part I could do maths, science, english, RE, all those core subjects with a minimum of fuss and very little work outside of class. I could generally do the homeworks in tutor or at lunch and I got As in all of them.

Art was not like that. Art required several hours work a week to get the stuff done. Not several hours to get done like in English, where you produce much better work the more time you spend on it. No, several hours just to get the work to the stage where you wouldn't get yelled at for not trying.

Never mind the fact that the subject was mostly talent based instead of learning based, you had to be talented at a wide range of arts and crafts based skills and had to be able to do a large range of artistic styles ranging from observational drawing and portrait painting one month to just about every damn style of indian artwork conceived in paintings, drawings, collages, felts, and whatever else the teacher felt like the next.

I am not bad at observational drawing and when I practice I improve very quickly. Had it been two years of observational drawing with a little painting I would have got a very high A*. But it wasn't. There were collages. Lots and lots and lots of collages. The teacher was especially fond of the type where you stick down on a page lots of different items you feel that relate to you. Equally bad were tasks involving filling an entire page with sketches so that no white paper was showing any more. I hate that stuff, it drives me insane and takes me ages to do. So after putting in more work to art than quite possibly any other subject, I got a B.

Art and music are subjects with chips on their shoulders. They have been around years and have been belittled and derided as soft, worthless and easy subjects since their inception. As a result they are two of the most stressful and talent based subjects you can take.

You want to do a doss subject? Take business studies. It hardly requires brains to do and you can put in bugger all effort and no one will notice. If you put no effort into art, you'll get noticed pretty damn quickly and get booted off the course.
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kultist
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Origami Bullets)
Academically, art is a doss subject. However, the sheer amount of work involved makes it anything but a doss subject.
No, it's really not. Something like business is a doss subject because you need no real talent or brains, and you don't need to work really hard to get a decent grade. Art requires a ton of talent AND really hard work to get a decent grade.
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dionysia1
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Renal)
Art is a doss subject if you're good enough at it, just like anything else.
I agree.
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kultist
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#45
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#45
(Original post by dionysia1)
I agree.
I don't. Even if you are very talented, that might only mean a drawing takes one hour instead of two. It hardly means you don't have to spend ages filling your sketchbook with prepwork and then some out of class on whatever major project you happen to be doing at the minute. Or has the definition of doss subject been changed to 'subject you enjoy doing'?
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Freud
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#46
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#46
Wow, I thought TSR would rip art to pieces.

I'm doing my degree in fine art after having done GCSE art, A level art, and an art foundation. I always find it funny that I've had to do a foundation to get onto my course, it requires extra training before I can start the degree. I've never found the workload to be unreasonable or too heavy on any of the courses I've done (apart from maybe the night before a deadline when I'll just panic) but I suppose a love for a subject means you don't notice high workloads.
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maxi321
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#47
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#47
Art is a bit of a doss. providing you have the skills to organise and are averagely creative, its piss easy. thats why i think its kind of grouped with subjects of media. the only difference between the two is that art just reqiures a smigen more of talent. but then speaking of organisation-not many artists are particulary organised. ps no offense to artist or anything.
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death.drop
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#48
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#48
(Original post by maxi321)
Art is a bit of a doss. providing you have the skills to organise and are averagely creative, its piss easy. thats why i think its kind of grouped with subjects of media. the only difference between the two is that art just reqiures a smigen more of talent. but then speaking of organisation-not many artists are particulary organised. ps no offense to artist or anything.
nah the workload for art is very high.

one of my mates did physics, maths, another mathsy thing, English literature and art and said art had by far the highest workload.
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piglet29
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#49
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#49
(Original post by necessarily benevolent)
In my opinion it isn't. Though I don't take it, apparently it requires quite a hefty amount of work, and you obviously need to be slightly talented to get a good grade. Maybe not the most academic subject but still not "doss". "Doss subjects" are subjects like Media, and Photography where you can most probably pass with no work, but Art always seems to be mentioned in that little group when the issue is brought up.

What is your view?

P.S. Why the hell is Modern Art so disappointing? Something like a couple of egg cartons hanging off a rod labelled "art" can't compare to the likes of Michelangelo's David. Ever.
Photography is not a doss subject. You don't know what you're talking about.
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lucky star
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#50
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#50
(Original post by watermelon sugar)
hell no.
you need a substantial amount of ability and creativity to do well at a level, more than your average joe has. and it takes time- spending six hours a week on high quality work, research and analysis isn't a doss. it's tough.
i dropped it originally because of the work load but picked it back up again for the lurrrve of it. i spend six hours(okay, give or take the odd fag break) a week in college working on it in complete silence and concentration, and a fair few hours at home on it :| possibly more than i do on each of my other subjects, but it's so rewarding.

people who say it's a doss probably haven't done it and couldn't hack it themselves. i am someone with a good natural ability and even i find it tough because it's so time consuming and it stretches you to produce really good work. i take a lot of pride in my work, and it pays off, but i wouldn't have got the grade i did if i hadn't put in the hours on practical work, research, analysis... i tend to let myself flow through projects, get new and changing ideas all the time, i don't follow set ideas or intentions, so it's a consistent amount of effort.
mmm i love art
i agree.. more or less =)
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SilentArrow
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#51
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#51
these days you can put a random object on the floor of a white room and call it art and will still get praised for it- but as a qualification theres a lot of work involved
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maxi321
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#52
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#52
(Original post by death.drop)
nah the workload for art is very high.

one of my mates did physics, maths, another mathsy thing, English literature and art and said art had by far the highest workload.
What i mean is that in comparison to acedemic subjects many will believe its a doss becauuse though the work load may be more, as a subject it requires minimum brain power in comparison to say, chemisty.

I've done both artys subjects and pure sciences and have found science to require you to learn and memorise more information and then they also come with there own work load. where as the arty subjects have more of a work load and less brain power. thats why many people consider them to be a doss.
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Juggy123
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#53
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#53
yes its a soft subject next question'?
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gracie88
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#54
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#54
I took art at A level and let me tell you it is in no way a doss subject. I also took business studies and history both of which are essay based subjects and I would say I spent 3/4 of my time doing work for art. You have to put so much time and effort in, even if you are extremely talented. I used to spend most of my free time at weekends doing work and would stay back after school 2 nights a week to finish off paintings or sculpture work.

It also costs you a fortune! The amount of acrylic paint and canvas' I went through was ridiculous. Then there's your pastels, decent drawing pencils, watercolours etc.
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la.de.da
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#55
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#55
(Original post by necessarily benevolent)
In my opinion it isn't. Though I don't take it, apparently it requires quite a hefty amount of work, and you obviously need to be slightly talented to get a good grade. Maybe not the most academic subject but still not "doss". "Doss subjects" are subjects like Media, and Photography where you can most probably pass with no work, but Art always seems to be mentioned in that little group when the issue is brought up.

:mad: Hmm.

But no Art and Media are not "doss" subjects. No A Level is a doss.
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whitepearlbaby
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#56
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#56
Of course not, some people actually study it.
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efemmedvazit
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#57
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#57
Lol, you've got to be kidding if you think its doss. For GCSE and A Level Fine Art and Textiles you are continually assessed- the whole year is like one big piece of coursework and you have a 3 days exam at the end of each year for A Level and in yr 11 for GCSE.

For each module (3 in a year) You have to produce a whole completed a3 sketchbook with annotations, drawings, use of different media showing intital ideas, research of artists and concepts, primary sources, then development of these sources and ideas for a 'final piece', exploration and experimentation of media and concepts for final piece, practice of the final piece, the FINAL PIECE, supporting work on big sheets of paper/ computer/ maquettes and an evaluation of said final piece. For A2 you must research an art related topic of your choosing and write an essay, then produce art work on it. For the exams, you have roughly 8-12 weeks from March- April/ May to produce a sketchbook and supporting work and ideas on the chosen question title which is usually one word/ phrase like 'Undergound and Overground', 'Boundaries' and so on then you have 1- 3 days to complete the final piece in in the classroom under test conditions (which sometimes means no ipod which is ****) without talking to anyone else and from pirmary source, really.

So, because of the time they put the exams on it means you dont get time to revise for your other A levels until you've finished the art exam
Obviously with art you cant resit anything because you need literally 13 weeks to complete a module, which is not a resit-able amount of time unlike 3 hour history papers or whatever. And art takes about 4 times longer to do the homework each week than other subjects It sucks out all your free time for your other Alevels and if you do **** in yr 12 (like me) you have to work really hard at A2 to bring your overall grade up because you cant resit!

The mark schemes are indrecibly rigorous too, so even if you are really talented if you dont get time to do 100 A1 sheets of ideas or something similarly ridciulous and annotations on every drawing, you wont get full marks. There was a girl in my art group who's riduclously talented and when I got to galleries and see early drawing by Van Gough, Picasso, Da Vinci etc, it look just like her work, but she didnt even get full marks!

Yeah, art's hard

And 'Modern Art' comes in many different guises. Some of it is stunning, due to improvements in technology and personal skill, whereas some of it is just pathetic, and you know what bits I'm on about- all the purely concept-based stuff that may as well be invisible and merely a concept. A level is very different to a uni degree in art- especially Fine Art, which I would say is dossy, because you have every day free to do something in and they only expect a few paintings at the end of it, as far as I know. Then again, thats just for Fine Art but with the more modern forms of art like illustration (which I was going to do at uni but have subsequently changed my mind) it requires lots of work and skill and good knowledge of the 'industry' and live projects.

In terms of modern art being disappointing, I think perhaps your own konwledge of modern art is not that broad yet and you are missing out on some great artists because they are not incredicbly famous. Perhaps you are fond of the times when children were assigned an apprentice like da Vinci who taught them how to paint and draw perspectively etc so that they became incredily talented? Me too!
Anyway, that my two cents
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Carl Sagan
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#58
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#58
It has a massive workload.
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watermelon sugar
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#59
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#59
(Original post by maxi321)
What i mean is that in comparison to acedemic subjects many will believe its a doss becauuse though the work load may be more, as a subject it requires minimum brain power in comparison to say, chemisty.
ha, no!
i do chemistry, physics, art, maths & further maths. and art pushes me to think the most by far. it's not solving or memorising like sciencey subjects, it's using a really teeny brief as a spring board into research and developing your own responses and ideas. recall and following methods is a lot more vegetative than creative thinking and exploration.


oh, and i'm talking about a level. because, yes, gcse art was a piece of piss that required no ability what so ever.
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efemmedvazit
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#60
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#60
(Original post by SpiritedAway)
to an extent, yes.
a friend of mine got an A in it, rarely gonig to the lessons and doing her coursework the night before it was due in. also, apparently you don't need to be able to draw, because you need to learn the theory side of it, and the practical side can be done on the computer.
BTW - media and photopgraphy maybe seen as 'soft subjects' but you can definitely can't pass with doing little work.
What art course was she doing and what exam board btw? I've got a friend who is super talented in every form of art- painting, carpentry, jewellery and especially textiles and she draws really high quality stuff in minutes but even she couldnt do coursework the night before! You know each piece of coursework is 13 weeks long? ! Good Luck for Leeds open day thing btw - I've only just got my application sent off :o:
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