The Student Room Group

Staying In Uni accom or commuting from home… discuss

What do you guys Think?
Pros and cons ?
Reply 1
Staying in uni accom:
- higher accom fees
- more social life
- independence from parents
- more convenient esp when you realise you’ve just left something in your room and have to head back with only 5 mins before the next lecture

Commuting from home:
- save money
- less social life
- less independence from parents
- commuting is inconvenient and annoying at times
I think a big pro about uni accomodation is you are around very like minded and different people that can relate to you and give you a new perspective on loads of different things.

Joseph - University of Sunderland Student Ambassador
Original post by meowzzi
Staying in uni accom:
- higher accom fees

Commuting from home:
- save money


Thats not always true I live in Reading but if I was to go to UEL (University of East London) for instance halls would cost me ~£196 a week that’s based on the most expensive standard accommodation.If I was to commute it would cost me ~£63.00 a day lets say your in uni 4 day a week (fairly normal for first year) I would be spending ~£256 a week on travel. So by not commuting I would be saving £60 a week which i could use for 3 weeks worth of lunch at uni or other things so saving money isn’t always the case.
(edited 11 months ago)
I always suggest to anybody contemplating commuting from home to think about the contact hours on their course (i.e. how frequently would you need to be commuting?) and how they would feel commuting during the winter months when the days are shorter and bad weather tends to disrupt public transport. Living in your university city can be a great way to gain independence, meet new people and socialise and if you're concerned about cost, you can certainly find some excellent accommodations that really give you value for money.

- Sophie
Reply 5
That means that you don't pay your parents anything rent wise? Which is fair enough but not "apples and apples"
You will miss out on a lot of social life and personal development/independence.
Having done the commute in 6th form college 90 mins each way it does take a toll and I am more than aware of the missing social side which was way less than happens at University.

It's also kind of a passion killer if you invite someone "for coffee" but they have a 25 mile journey to have it.
Original post by Manchester Met - Student Rep
What do you guys Think?
Pros and cons ?


Staying in uni acommidation has many pros I’ve touched on finance already but there are so many more:

1/ Finance Just to push home the point it can be cheaper live in halls.

Original post by jonathanemptage
Thats not always true I live in Reading but if I was to go to UEL (University of East London) for instance halls would cost me ~£196 a week that’s based on the most expensive standard accommodation.If I was to commute it would cost me ~£63.00 a day lets say your in uni 4 day a week (fairly normal for first year) I would be spending ~£256 a week on travel. So by not commuting I would be saving £60 a week which i could use for 3 weeks worth of lunch at uni or other things so saving money isn’t always the case.


2/Social life your social life will be so much better living in halls there are club nights of course but these are often planned fairly last minute or even mere minutes before hand. Then halls life if people don’t want to go out you could have video game tournament (ah Mario kart how I love you). one guy in my halls liked cooking so we’d have dinner parties some times. Then there were kitchen olympics in my brothers halls (they adapted sports like tennis and played them in the kitchen). There are also inter hall sports tournament like 5 a side football sometimes.Then there are parties which you either won’t know about or be able to get to because your not there. Also if you do manage to go out and you get lucky where are you going to take her you can’t take her home can you particularly for a one night stand.

3/ Society stuff Most societies have social nights (usually on Wednesdays) usually starting around 7 (where will you hang around when you don’t know many people at the start) so halls are better for that. Also if your playing in BCUS competitions they won’t drop you at home but they will drop you back at halls so thats a plus especially if you win. Also if your soc does trips they can be planned on the day (Milton Keynes snow dome) and if you can’t grab your ski boots you’ll have to make do with rental boots and really who wants to do that thats fairly specific but the point stands if you have gear you want to use and it’t been planned that morning you might have to rent or even not be able to take part.so there’s that also if your tied to the trains you’ll have to leave the clubs early and thats never fun.

4/ your time table Nobody ever considers this but your time table can often make halls a far better option. if you take my first year I had 2 11-12 hour days 9-6 or 7 alternating weeks id on’t know about you but i wouldn’t have wanted to trudge back to the station and stit on a train after that. In my second year I had a 9 hour break one one day of course you can use a some of that time to study but doing 9 hours just isn’t possible. Uni timetables are created with halls in mind as a majority of students are in halls.

5/ Accademics This is probably the most relevant section it why your there of course. at uni you will occasionally have group projects these as stated above are created with halls in mind you will be having meetings with your group to plan things and they really might get a bit irritated if besides having to work around their own time tables and commitments they need to work around train time tables too. Then in this time of wild strikes you’ll likely miss some lectures because trains have been cancelled because of the strikes. Missing a couple of lectures isn’t a huge problem but part of your mark does rely on you turning up some sessions also include in class tests that count towards your grade if you miss the well that is a problem because train strikes are not seen as extenuating circumstances “you should have planed for this,” (not said to me) and if you miss an exam well... it doesn’t bear thinking about .

I can’t really think of too many con’s for halls except for homesickness and that passes in time.


That said are there any pros to commuting well yeah there are some:

1/ If your close with your family they are right there as one of the best support networks you could ver hope for so that’s good.

2/ Home cooked meals you really can’t appreciate how good this is until you have to cook for your self i missed these at uni and always relished them when I got home.

I think that’s it living at home has some cons too.

1/ It can be loud which can really hinder you study if you have young sibling they are just being kids but you do need an environment where they won’t disturb you

2/ Lack of independence you might love your parents ( i know I do) but while your at home they still have som control they could impose curfew r try and ground you or something really at uni you’ll need your independence.

Spoiler



the rest i think you can work out fro the halls pros. Imho living in halls is much better than commuting at uni i would seriously consider it.
(edited 11 months ago)
Original post by Manchester Met - Student Rep
What do you guys Think?
Pros and cons ?

Here are some things I've come up with in response to this...
Staying in uni accom...
- Opportunity to make more friends and live with them
- You get your first taste of moving out and what it's like to fend for yourself.
- It's easier to go on nights out with your new friends and get home safely.
- It's easier to get a part-time job alongside your studies and helps you get to grips with the city.
- It's easier to take advantage of the university's facilities when you live in the city. For example, you can use the library late at night when you've got deadlines whereas if you were commuting you'd have to travel back.
- It's less travel fees and you'll be less sick of travelling.

- Possibly quite expensive if you can't afford it
- There will be food money and necessities money each week to pay for.
- You may miss home if you're close with your family.

Commuting...
- You could spend more time with your parents
- Less money spent on rent and could technically spend your finance on whatever you'd like
- You can stay close to the friends you've grown up with.

- May miss out on the uni experience as you're not able to spend as much time with your friends as they're spending with each other.
- Difficult and more dangerous to get back after nights-out.
- Can't use university facilities later at night because it's difficult to get back
- Travel strikes and delays may impact your journey
- You'll have to wake up earlier for early lectures and that may be more difficult if you're not a morning person.

This is all from the perspective of someone who stays in a university accommodation.
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU
(edited 11 months ago)
Original post by meowzzi
Staying in uni accom:
- higher accom fees
- more social life
- independence from parents
- more convenient esp when you realise you’ve just left something in your room and have to head back with only 5 mins before the next lecture

Commuting from home:
- save money
- less social life
- less independence from parents
- commuting is inconvenient and annoying at times

Hi @meowzzi
Brilliant points! Are you at uni? If so are you staying at uni or commuting?
best wishes,
Emily
Original post by jonathanemptage
Thats not always true I live in Reading but if I was to go to UEL (University of East London) for instance halls would cost me ~£196 a week that’s based on the most expensive standard accommodation.If I was to commute it would cost me ~£63.00 a day lets say your in uni 4 day a week (fairly normal for first year) I would be spending ~£256 a week on travel. So by not commuting I would be saving £60 a week which i could use for 3 weeks worth of lunch at uni or other things so saving money isn’t always the case.


Hi @jonathanemptage [br] this is such an enlightening point of view. I’ve seen so many arguments for how commuting is cheap we but never how it’s more expensive.
thanks for that response
best wishes
Emily<3
Original post by StudentRoost Rep
I always suggest to anybody contemplating commuting from home to think about the contact hours on their course (i.e. how frequently would you need to be commuting?) and how they would feel commuting during the winter months when the days are shorter and bad weather tends to disrupt public transport. Living in your university city can be a great way to gain independence, meet new people and socialise and if you're concerned about cost, you can certainly find some excellent accommodations that really give you value for money.

- Sophie


Hi @StudentRoost Rep [br] good point! What else would you say should be on the check list of things to look at if your deciding to commute or live in? ( as well as contact hour time obviously )
best wishes
Emily <3
Original post by domonict
That means that you don't pay your parents anything rent wise? Which is fair enough but not "apples and apples"
You will miss out on a lot of social life and personal development/independence.
Having done the commute in 6th form college 90 mins each way it does take a toll and I am more than aware of the missing social side which was way less than happens at University.

It's also kind of a passion killer if you invite someone "for coffee" but they have a 25 mile journey to have it.

Hi @domonict
Good point actually! What would you say is a good distance/ do-able distance to travel for a commuting student.?

thanks
Emily <3

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