Textbooks or Casebooks (or Nutshells/Nutcases!)?

Watch
This discussion is closed.
NDGAARONDI
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#21
Report 15 years ago
#21
(Original post by kingslaw)
To rigorously scan the law journals every week/month for updated points of law would be a waste of valuable time - luckily the tutors recognise this.
Excellent. More time for other things.

I'm guessing that law lecturers make the corrections on the points of law which are incorrect in material?
0
supervin
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#22
Report 15 years ago
#22
Problem questions v essay questions in the closed book final exams: which do you guys prefer and why? Of course I'm referring to general preferences as subjects like Constitutional & Administrative Law and International Law are bound to have more essay questions than in other subjects like Land Law or Family Law.

Preparation for either type is completely different from each other in terms of method, IMO. Familiarity with specific law in many scenarios for the former type v familiarity with law, related theory and policy with respect to developments and reform for the latter. How do you guys go about this?
0
kingslaw
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#23
Report Thread starter 15 years ago
#23
(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
Excellent. More time for other things.

I'm guessing that law lecturers make the corrections on the points of law which are incorrect in material?
My tutor does. I've only really had the problem in Criminal with Clarkson & Keating. Because we generally go into things in much more depth in the tutorials, and it is here where we find rather dodgy interpretations of some speeches (or just plain omission of ratio), the corrections are usually made in tutorials and not lectures.
0
supervin
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#24
Report 15 years ago
#24
(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
But points of view are not points of law and the law in the book is only as good as the time of the publication. This is where reports between publication to date come in handy.
What you read in the textbooks is the author's perspective of the point of law of the authority - that makes it a point of view of the point of law. Reading the primary sources and then extracting the point of law from it or from references in other judgments would be as close as possible to the point of law in true form.
0
NDGAARONDI
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#25
Report 15 years ago
#25
(Original post by kingslaw)
I've only really had the problem in Criminal with Clarkson & Keating. Because we generally go into things in much more depth in the tutorials, and it is here where we find rather dodgy interpretations of some speeches (or just plain omission of ratio), the corrections are usually made in tutorials and not lectures.
Ah well. Will bear this in mind. I always thought Clarkson & Keating was handy just a few extra cases. It's a big enough book after all.
0
NDGAARONDI
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#26
Report 15 years ago
#26
What abouyt Briefcase textbooks and 'study books' (e.g. Studies in Constitutional Law by Colin R. Munro)? You can use the briefcase for revision and the study book as an aid during your usual studies.
0
lawgrad
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#27
Report 15 years ago
#27
(Original post by supervin)
Problem questions v essay questions in the closed book final exams: which do you guys prefer and why? Of course I'm referring to general preferences as subjects like Constitutional & Administrative Law and International Law are bound to have more essay questions than in other subjects like Land Law or Family Law.

Preparation for either type is completely different from each other in terms of method, IMO. Familiarity with specific law in many scenarios for the former type v familiarity with law, related theory and policy with respect to developments and reform for the latter. How do you guys go about this?
Generally, it is easier to pass an essay question, but a bit harder to get a first in it. In a problem question, it is very possible to fail if you miss the key issue, but also easier to get a first if you deal with all the issues well.

Of course, ultimately, it all depends on the question - always do the one you know most about and which you completely understand!! If you do not answer the question asked, you will get a poor mark, no matter how outstanding the quality of your written piece. You will be AMAZED at the number of bright law students at top law schools who still do not answer the question asked!
0
NDGAARONDI
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#28
Report 15 years ago
#28
(Original post by lawgrad)
You will be AMAZED at the number of bright law students at top law schools who still do not answer the question asked!
As one law examiner said once, "...answer the bloody question".
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What are you most likely to do if you don't get the grades you were expecting?

Go through Clearing (65)
41.4%
Take autumn exams (54)
34.39%
Look for a job (4)
2.55%
Consider an apprenticeship (4)
2.55%
Take a year out (21)
13.38%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (9)
5.73%

Watched Threads

View All