Cortez
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I have entered for the F5 exam, performance management, if it makes any difference.

It's on the 8th December. Thing is, I've not done any study since I bought my books in September and have cancelled my revision course and told employer that I don't want to do it. However I feel like I've made a mistake and actually want to still sit the exam. Now the pressure isn't there because they think I'm not doing it, it seems some what easier and I'm thinking of just going and sitting the exam and see how things go.

Basically I have like 18 days to learn it all. What percentage do I need to pass and do you think it's doable? It all seems quite familiar from AAT.

And yes I know I'm stupid. I've been on and off the idea of doing ACCA for ever. I don't know what I want most the time!!
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Illusionary
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The pass mark is 50%, AFAIK
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Cortez
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Well that doesn't seem too unattainable. Might give it a shot.
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Steffy
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Although the pass mark is 50%, only 50% of the people that sit them pass first time.
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romski
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pass mark is 50 and ACCA is the hardest out of the big 3. but whatever you do dont run from the exam go and sit it.

sometimes all the stuff you revised comes up

they arent easy at all but they are passable i passed f4+f6 on 51% and i messed up big time in f6
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Kemik
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(Original post by romski)
pass mark is 50 and ACCA is the hardest out of the big 3. but whatever you do dont run from the exam go and sit it.

sometimes all the stuff you revised comes up

they arent easy at all but they are passable i passed f4+f6 on 51% and i messed up big time in f6
Troll.
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romski
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(Original post by Kemik)
Troll.
go and compare pass rates for ACA/CIMA and ACCA and then return with an apology for not having any idea about accountancy
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Kemik
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(Original post by romski)
go and compare pass rates for ACA/CIMA and ACCA and then return with an apology for not having any idea about accountancy
Pass rates doesn't equal difficulty. You need to look at the requirements to sit the exams first.
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Illusionary
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(Original post by romski)
go and compare pass rates for ACA/CIMA and ACCA and then return with an apology for not having any idea about accountancy
Does this (below) suggest anything to you?
(Original post by Kemik)
KPMG Tax Intern 08 - Tax Grad 09
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romski
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(Original post by Kemik)
Pass rates doesn't equal difficulty. You need to look at the requirements to sit the exams first.
the requirements are all the same you plonker, im sorry but the ACCA examiners are too heavy handed when isee pass rates of 28% for particular exams i think thats just evil
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Illusionary
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(Original post by romski)
the requirements are all the same you plonker, im sorry but the ACCA examiners are too heavy handed when isee pass rates of 28% for particular exams i think thats just evil
:rolleyes: Look, neither of us are trying to do down your chosen qualification, but please read this and reconsider your statement:

http://www.kpmgcareers.co.uk/Graduat...9).aspx?pg=119
ACA is offered by the ICAEW (the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales) and CA is offered by ICAS (the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Scotland). All trainees in Scotland study for CA. The ACA and CA are three-year courses. The entry requirements for both are 300 UCAS tariff points, a grade A in GCSE Maths and at least a 2:1 in any subject.

You can also study for ACCA, which is a three-and-a-half year course. The entry requirements for ACCA are at least 260 UCAS Tariff points, a grade B in GCSE Maths and at least a 2:1 in any subject.
^^ That's just one example...

Plainly, in terms of entry requirements alone, CA (ICAS) > ACA (ICAEW) > ACCA

However, usually CA and ACA entry requirements are the same - the slight difference is that ICAS themselves require a degree for entry, while with the ICAEW it is the training firm who require a degree. It's not uncommon to find ACCA programs that don't require a degree.
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romski
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oh yeah i agree with that, personally i would like to see some consolidation.

rather than having 3 maybe just one, this could be a better way to judge candidates.

although ACA will always get support from big firms etc but it is pretty cumbersome

ACCA is good but maybe too hard and not really invovled with enough training places
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DJKL
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A very long time ago, 1980s, ICAS used to use a negative marking scheme for their exams i.e. you start with 100 and lose marks for each and every omission from the exam marker's model answer.
Pass rates were in the 20-30% range.

No idea if this is still the case now.

The other difference used to be if you failed in one subject at a level you had to resit entire level, ( one referral from memory allowed if borderline) The old level 2 was 8 subjects! Again no idea if this is still the case.

The old ACCA allowed you, within a time period, to pick of the 8 level 2 subjects i.e. not sit all at same time.
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Barny
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Yeh it's doable, I passed F2 with two days work and F5 is just a continuation of that sorta stuff. If you have a brain for Maths/equations it's a piece of piss. Make sure you learn all the different types of costing thoroughly, there's a lot of marks on that. As always there's easy bits and hard bits - learn the easy bits quickly, spend more time on the hard bits and there's no way you can fail. Good luck!
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romski
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before ACCA used to make you sit exams in order eg 2.1 then pass 2.2 now you can sit them anyhow
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AdaD
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(Original post by Steffy)
Although the pass mark is 50%, only 50% of the people that sit them pass first time.
The June pass rate for F5 was actually 28%!!

It is definitely do-able in 18 days, without a doubt. I failed it (41%) with 5 days revision so I am fairly sure you can do it with an extra 13 days!
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AdaD
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It is definitely do-able in 18 days, without a doubt. I failed it (41%) with 5 days revision so I am fairly sure you can do it with an extra 13 days!
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tqt9
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are ACCA exams hard? and how much work is needed for them?
i did economics at uni and looking to go into accountancy,
does anyone know anything about the CIMA exams are they hard?
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Kemik
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(Original post by tqt9)
are ACCA exams hard? and how much work is needed for them?
i did economics at uni and looking to go into accountancy,
does anyone know anything about the CIMA exams are they hard?
It all depends on your definition of hard. Apparently they're as difficult as doing a masters.
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Barny
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There's as much material as a Masters degree maybe. As you say it depends on your definition of hard. I find ACCA material pitifully easy and monotonous, but I know plenty of people who really struggle with it.
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