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a level english literature

how do you create essay plans for revision?
Original post by hannahgawman
how do you create essay plans for revision?


Look at the common question style for your exam board. Most are structured in a 'How does [writer's name] present the [theme/character]?' style.

In this case, you would write out a list of every theme and character that might come up. Write them all out in the question style.

Then for each newly made-up question, you would plan a response. Include quotes, context, critics and analysis.

Then review this before your mocks and exams.
Original post by hannahgawman
how do you create essay plans for revision?


I looked at the exam board example essays and boxed them up to find a structure that helped.

Then I reviewed all previous exam questions and looked at the structure of the question.
Most AQA lit questions tend to be either on a character or a theme so I found key moments in the texts that link to each character or theme that would work in an essay.

Planning responses to past questions and made up questions is the best approach as you can practise covering all of the AO’s whilst thinking about what your response would be.

Use the mark schemes to your advantage as past mark schemes will have ideas that can cover a multitude of questions, not just the one that it’s based around.

Past papers and mark schemes are a gift!
Reply 3
how in depth should the plans be? i’m not sure how to create them because the essays i am writing now aren’t getting the best marks
Original post by hannahgawman
how in depth should the plans be? i’m not sure how to create them because the essays i am writing now aren’t getting the best marks


I usually try and plan out my line of argument and look at each paragraph using the AO’s

Look at the mark schemes of past papers and use the stuff from them to create a rough structure that cover all the AO’s

Typically my plans will be around 1-2 pages long if it’s a question i’ve been given in advance, but in an exam mine is usually a lot shorter and more of an idea of what my line of argument is what i’m going to cover each paragraph.
Reply 5
okay thank you so much!! in terms of creating a line of argument could you possibly give me an example?
Original post by top-lushness
I usually try and plan out my line of argument and look at each paragraph using the AO’s

Look at the mark schemes of past papers and use the stuff from them to create a rough structure that cover all the AO’s

Typically my plans will be around 1-2 pages long if it’s a question i’ve been given in advance, but in an exam mine is usually a lot shorter and more of an idea of what my line of argument is what i’m going to cover each paragraph.
Original post by hannahgawman
okay thank you so much!! in terms of creating a line of argument could you possibly give me an example?

I would recommend you do some research on thesis statements. They will help improve your essays.

https://blogasenglish.wordpress.com/2016/04/15/essay-tips-writing-a-thesis-statement/
Original post by hannahgawman
okay thank you so much!! in terms of creating a line of argument could you possibly give me an example?


Sure!!

I’ll use this question as an example:

King Lear William Shakespeare
‘Family relationships are broken beyond repair in the tragedy of King Lear.’
To what extent do you agree with this view?

I’d go with the line of argument that majority of family relationships are broken beyond repair but not all.

I’d then write one paragraph about one family relationship that is broken and how it’s beyond repair

Then i’d write a paragraph about another kind of family relationship that is broken and how it’s beyond repair

And then i’d write my final paragraph about a family relationship that has not been broken beyond repair.

Then conclude by wrapping up my argument, and bringing in what i explored in my paragraphs.

Trying to outline what you want to argue in your intro and then following that throughout is super important! You’re trying to argue something throughout to the examiner and back it up with evidence and explaining why! (:
Reply 8
Original post by top-lushness
Sure!!

I’ll use this question as an example:

King Lear William Shakespeare
‘Family relationships are broken beyond repair in the tragedy of King Lear.’
To what extent do you agree with this view?

I’d go with the line of argument that majority of family relationships are broken beyond repair but not all.

I’d then write one paragraph about one family relationship that is broken and how it’s beyond repair

Then i’d write a paragraph about another kind of family relationship that is broken and how it’s beyond repair

And then i’d write my final paragraph about a family relationship that has not been broken beyond repair.

Then conclude by wrapping up my argument, and bringing in what i explored in my paragraphs.

Trying to outline what you want to argue in your intro and then following that throughout is super important! You’re trying to argue something throughout to the examiner and back it up with evidence and explaining why! (:

you’re amazing thank you so so much
Reply 9
Original post by PrivEnglishTutor
I would recommend you do some research on thesis statements. They will help improve your essays.

https://blogasenglish.wordpress.com/2016/04/15/essay-tips-writing-a-thesis-statement/


thanks for the link! i’ve never really been taught the true essay structure!!!

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