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A level chemistry q

why does it say ca+ >ca when second ionisation energy has a 2+ an first ionisation energy has ca+

i dont know why the answer is that
enthalpy.pngenthalpy change 2.png
Original post by user1034723
why does it say ca+ >ca when second ionisation energy has a 2+ an first ionisation energy has ca+

i dont know why the answer is that
Reply 2
The electron is lost from Ca+ for second ionisation energy, and from Ca for first ionisation energy.
Ca2+ is formed from Ca+
Since the electron is lost from Ca+, we are only concerned with how the energy required to remove the electron, from Ca+, rather than what product is formed (Ca2+)

In other words, for 2nd ionisation energy, the electron is lost from Ca+.
Ca+ is smaller than the Ca, so there is a greater attraction between the electron and the nucleus, thus a greater energy is required
Original post by Teruko
The electron is lost from Ca+ for second ionisation energy, and from Ca for first ionisation energy.
Ca2+ is formed from Ca+
Since the electron is lost from Ca+, we are only concerned with how the energy required to remove the electron, from Ca+, rather than what product is formed (Ca2+)

In other words, for 2nd ionisation energy, the electron is lost from Ca+.
Ca+ is smaller than the Ca, so there is a greater attraction between the electron and the nucleus, thus a greater energy is required


ty:smile:
why does it have in the second ionisation energy formula ca2+ +2e----> wouldnt that mean the 2e- electrons lost from ca2+
Reply 4
Not sure about that,
The formula for 2nd ie should be
Ca+ ----> Ca2+ + e-

Maybe it's the overall equation for both the first and second ionisation energies,
Ca ----> Ca+ + e-
Ca+ ----> Ca2+ + e-
Combined would become:
Ca ----> Ca2+ + 2e-
Original post by Teruko
The electron is lost from Ca+ for second ionisation energy, and from Ca for first ionisation energy.
Ca2+ is formed from Ca+
Since the electron is lost from Ca+, we are only concerned with how the energy required to remove the electron, from Ca+, rather than what product is formed (Ca2+)

In other words, for 2nd ionisation energy, the electron is lost from Ca+.
Ca+ is smaller than the Ca, so there is a greater attraction between the electron and the nucleus, thus a greater energy is required

ohh tysm:smile::smile:
Original post by Teruko
Not sure about that,
The formula for 2nd ie should be
Ca+ ----> Ca2+ + e-

Maybe it's the overall equation for both the first and second ionisation energies,
Ca ----> Ca+ + e-
Ca+ ----> Ca2+ + e-
Combined would become:
Ca ----> Ca2+ + 2e-

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