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trev
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#41
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#41
Cool. You could have math, biology, chemistry. If you are interested in one more subject, you could choose anyone that you like to do.
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AllergicToFairydust
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#42
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I know a girl who is now at Cambridge, she did 3 A levels at school, three at college, by night...got fours As and two Bs. I don't know why she did it but she must have a good reason too have done it.
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trev
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#43
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Maybe the other 3 courses are not offered by the school, so she might go to college and do it.
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green_eyes
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#44
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hi!
i'm doing maths, physics, chemistry, biology, general studies at A-level and further maths AS and an extra maths module (because my school doesn't offer the full aths a-level ggrrr). AS was fine (i got all As), A2 isn't much harder but the exams are scaring me because we have to relearn most of the AS course for the synoptic papers in chem, bio and physics which is a right pain! the only other thing i'd say is i think im the only person at my school doing 5 and an AS (or im in the minority) and everyone else has so many frees...
i think its worth it in the end though, and i enjoy all my subjects, despite the coursework!
i'd say go for it, if it doesn't work out you can always drop a subject and it dosn't matter!
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AllergicToFairydust
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#45
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(Original post by trev)
Maybe the other 3 courses are not offered by the school, so she might go to college and do it.
oh I meant I didn't know why she went to college, I meant taking 6 A levels. Her school wouldn't sign her up for 6 subjects and she had timetable clashes.
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trev
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#46
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Fair enough.
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Zarathustra
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#47
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(Original post by staylor)
Interesting - are these for all subjects and do all schols do them? I have heard nothing about this! :confused:

Thank you for this information - I would definitely be interested in this, but even if they are available to me I'd have never heard anything about them at my school :mad:.

What did you think of the AEAs Zarathustra? (and anybody else whohas done them)
They aren't for all subjects, though there are increasing numbers of them each year. Only one exam board sets the exam for each subject, so there will be questions on it covering all of the different syllabuses [syllabi?!].
They're all three hours long. The reason they're not exam-board specific is so that everyone can take them regardless of their schooling (provided they're doing the right subjecct, obv) so you will be allowed to do them. Chances are your school (or at least the relevant departments) might not be familiar with them either (-I'm going to be the first person at my school to have been entered for the the Rs one)...
You don't need to do it until late year 12 earliest, but when that time comes set about talking to your subject teacher / head of department for the subject that you want to do, to find out if they'd be willing to enter you. Don't be put off it they don't know what it is - just give them the information and tell them you'll sort out the entries. If they say ok, go see your school examinations officer with your name and the exam code and make sure it's on the first issue of your May/June timetable. This all won't be for ages, obviously.

Umm...what else can I say? As far as I know (from talking to people around my age group etc.) most people do one, maybe two. There are of course lots of people on tsr doing more though ( :rolleyes: ). I myself am doing RS, English & Psychology (though my school tried to stop me with the whole "no-one here does three line". Nice try.).

And, er...oh they're supposed to be at the end of the exam season so they don't interfere with your others, only that hasn't worked out with the damn psychology one this summer - it's going to be bang inbetween my English and Sociology synoptic papers. Grrr...

Oh and in answer to your question - I haven't done them yet! They're on my list for this summer, lol.

Re: whoever said not to bother as they won't be included in offers. Even if not included they will be noticed - it looks good if you're doing them (see earlier post about my Cam interview). However, some offers might include them (I know Cam do it sometimes) - this is not a good thing. You could be brilliant at whatever subject and still not pass it, as loads of people don't. It's tricky come UCAS time trying to decide between wanting them to know you're not doing it but not wanting to risk getting an AEA offer! I took my chances and it worked out...


No idea if I've covered anything useful. Happy to field anymore questions, though as I said I've only done the sorting-out-taking-them and not actually taking-them part!

ZarathustraX

EDIT: Look at this!
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xx_ambellina_xx
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#48
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i'm doing 5 a levels this year...two sciences, a language and two arts...it's tough since i've never been to a welsh lesson and i have to teach it to myself and i'm not a welsh speaker, neither are any of my family...i also have to teach myself music. both of these are because my school wouldn't change the timetable to accomodate clashes, so i said i'd do them anyway myself. it is a lot of hard work but i'd do the same again probably.
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AllergicToFairydust
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#49
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(Original post by xx_ambellina_xx)
i'm doing 5 a levels this year...two sciences, a language and two arts...it's tough since i've never been to a welsh lesson and i have to teach it to myself and i'm not a welsh speaker, neither are any of my family...i also have to teach myself music. both of these are because my school wouldn't change the timetable to accomodate clashes, so i said i'd do them anyway myself. it is a lot of hard work but i'd do the same again probably.
Welsh is the 2nd hardest to learn in the world remember. After year 9 I never bothered to turn up for welsh compsuley lessons yet in my ROA in year 11 I had been awarded the diamond welsh award (the highest!)
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staylor
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#50
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THanks for great info on AEAs Zarathustra. This looks like just the kind of info I was hoping to get


HAS anybody done AEAs yet? My school has certainly not heard of them and I dont know where to get information :hmpf:
How did other people find them?
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'ica
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#51
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I have 4 A-levels and am currently studying towards my 5th, however my circumstances are completewly different to yours. I got AABC at A-level and had to do another A-level to get, hopefully, a B. But as someone else has already said, it may look good on paper, but having more than 4 is not really necessary - and even then 3 is likely to be sufficient for most places. Don't get me wrong, being able to say "i've got 5 A-levels" is great - but the strain on your life is not really worth the extra work load which you'll have to undertake. I disagree that science and maths based subjects are easier. Obviously you have a natural ability in these subjects - these subjects are easier for you than they would be for me. I did mostly humanities, which I didn't find too difficult, exept for French, hence the C. But this is because this is where my natural talents lie. All A-levels are hard work, but you do have more time than u think at A-level if u knuckle down, but sixth form is not just about work - u have to think about the effect on your social life as well - as this plays a huge part in sixth form life.
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may-hu-na
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#52
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i'm doing 5 a-levels this year... roughly the same subjects as u.

i'm doing maths, chem, bio, bus stud and gen stud....

it is kinda hard wiv lots of work..... but it can be done and i'm making sure i achieve the best possible i can.......... i know people who've done 5 and got B's and A's.....

so anything is possible
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pixiepeep
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#53
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I did 5 AS's (but only cause they wouldn't let me do 6) and I dropped the most tedious for A2. It is a lot of work if you have lots of coursework subjects, but I'm quite lucky in that repsect. I'm rushed off my feet atm with all my coursework needing to be in together, but if you can keep yourself organised then theres no reason not to do 5
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#54
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I didn't do AEAs but it seems to due to the increasing numbers of A grades at A-Level, Cambridge I know in particular are looking for other distinguishing factors to separate the just A grades from the really high-flyers. A lot of this can be determined from interview, but this is not always the case. Hence, I do think AEAs are a good thing.

Staylor - do you have any idea what degree you'd like to do, or what job you'd like to get after that even?

wrt whether or not it is necessary to do 5 - I'm not sure my views on this. Firstly I think that if you don't know what you want to do after school, and you're good at a lot of things, then personally I reckon the more the better. Doing 5 a-levels doesn't have to hamper on your social life etc - it's very possible to enjoy it just as much as everyone else and still do extracurricular stuff. (I may get beaten down for this but...) I also reckon that although not necessary (offers etc only specify 3) I think a larger number of a-levels (provided you've got extracurricular stuff etc) reflects that you are able to work under pressure, which I've been lead to believe is something that would definitely impress Cambridge.
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happysoul
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(Original post by joshdajoker)
instead of choosing your A-levels choose the degree you want. I found it was so much easier when you consider your uni placement before choosing your A-levels.

I would also only choose 4 A-levels. You seem like someone who would do a University degree and A-levels would only be the icing on the cake when it comes to getting a job once you have a degree.

My personal opinion would be to drop a science and IT if you onyl wanted 3 A-levels.
If you wanted 4 I would drop just IT. IT is a joke and it requires no more skills than the average computer enthusiast. and you certainly dont need it for any degree course.
You obviously don't do ICT. There is a huge amount of coursework both for AS and A level, which requires discipline to work through it. The mark schemes for the exam papers are so tight that although you may know all theory, it is very difficult to attain high marks. This is why it is scaled up so much for UMS. If you were doing something ICT based for a degree, you would obviously need ICT, purely logical, don't you think? :mad:
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staylor
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#56
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I know what you mean about the IT - I did the Unit 2 AVCE exam in January and really hated the wording. It was extremely hard to get high marks (or it seems so - I dont have he marks back yet ) The course so far though wasnt so bad. I managed it okay though there will be some differences if I continue it.
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kellywood_5
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(Original post by staylor)
I know what you mean about the IT - I did the Unit 2 AVCE exam in January and really hated the wording. It was extremely hard to get high marks (or it seems so - I dont have he marks back yet ) The course so far though wasnt so bad. I managed it okay though there will be some differences if I continue it.
The coursework for ICT (I can only speak for the AVCE, not the A-level) is easy and basically just following instructions, but it is very time-consuming, hence my D As for the exams, although the questions look reasonably straightforward and as though you don't need any previous knowledge, it does seem very difficult to get the top grades. When I did my Unit 2 exam last January, I got 63 UMS, which is a low C- and that was the highest out of everyone at my school who took it!
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trev
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I think marked very hard on unit 2 last summer. In my class the highest grade was a C. Loads of people got a D, while some people got a U!
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staylor
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#59
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The same thing was true in my school - the highest grade was a D perhaps (in the previous group, not mine).

On the bright side, my IT teacher wored out that if you get a C in your coursework and an E in the exam (i think), you still came out with a C (though that still isnt great :hmpf: ).
They at least seem to realise how hard the exam is
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trev
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I don't think exam is hard, but I just think that the examiners was marking that unit quite hard. I got a D, two marks of a C. I still got an A as ASVCE as I got A grades on my coursework.
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