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A-Level Politics

Hey guys, I have been struggling to come up with a third point for this question:
"Evaluate the view that class remains the most important factor to determine voting behaviour"
Obviously, A/B vote CON
D/E vote LAB
those are 2 points for 2 paragraphs
What could be the 3rd one?
Reply 1
Original post by meli77
Hey guys, I have been struggling to come up with a third point for this question:
"Evaluate the view that class remains the most important factor to determine voting behaviour"
Obviously, A/B vote CON
D/E vote LAB
those are 2 points for 2 paragraphs
What could be the 3rd one?


I'd do media influence or maybe something that links with material conditions. (I did edex btw)
here's a paragraph plan I have from last year on the media's presentation of economic factors you could adjust
T: Presentation of economic factors.
CWA: The media are able to present macroeconomics in a way people might not grasp.
- Saatchi and Saatchi “Labour isn’t working” campaign picked up by media in 1979, in addition to the frontpage status of “Crisis? What crisis?”
- The economy was the primary topic in the 2010 debates, with “I agree with Nick” being a dominant phrase picked up in the debates, adding to his relevance.
F: They weren’t fabricating economic crises, but reinforcing people’s negative feelings + Nick Clegg actually lost seats in 2010.
A: This is the most important factor in elections, people’s material conditions and the promises of improvements are what sway people
- 1978-9 “Winter of discontent” in which unemployment reached 1.5 million
- 2010: Brown blamed for recession while the austerity presented by Cameron was attractive to the middle class.
S: Neither of these things were really the fault of these two figures (Oil crisis, sub-prime mortgage), the media emphasised it but people will associate poor conditions with the government and better things with the opposition.
J: material conditions decide elections
Reply 2
Original post by emm3
I'd do media influence or maybe something that links with material conditions. (I did edex btw)
here's a paragraph plan I have from last year on the media's presentation of economic factors you could adjust
T: Presentation of economic factors.
CWA: The media are able to present macroeconomics in a way people might not grasp.
- Saatchi and Saatchi “Labour isn’t working” campaign picked up by media in 1979, in addition to the frontpage status of “Crisis? What crisis?”
- The economy was the primary topic in the 2010 debates, with “I agree with Nick” being a dominant phrase picked up in the debates, adding to his relevance.
F: They weren’t fabricating economic crises, but reinforcing people’s negative feelings + Nick Clegg actually lost seats in 2010.
A: This is the most important factor in elections, people’s material conditions and the promises of improvements are what sway people
- 1978-9 “Winter of discontent” in which unemployment reached 1.5 million
- 2010: Brown blamed for recession while the austerity presented by Cameron was attractive to the middle class.
S: Neither of these things were really the fault of these two figures (Oil crisis, sub-prime mortgage), the media emphasised it but people will associate poor conditions with the government and better things with the opposition.
J: material conditions decide elections

Hey ! Thanks for ur reply! I was asking for something different though. I want another point supporting that class is still a predictable indicator not the media.
Reply 3
hmm, perhaps you could do how the middle class are our equivalent of swing States? link Blair and Cameron and how they adjusted their typical party politics to appeal?
Original post by meli77
Hey ! Thanks for ur reply! I was asking for something different though. I want another point supporting that class is still a predictable indicator not the media.
Reply 4
Certainly. When evaluating the view that class remains the most important factor in determining voting behaviour, it is important to consider the role of other factors that may be at play. One such factor is age. Younger voters, for example, may be more likely to vote for parties that prioritise issues such as climate change and social justice, while older voters may be more likely to prioritise issues such as the economy and national security.

Another factor to consider is geography. In certain regions, such as rural areas or inner cities, voting patterns may be influenced by local issues and concerns. In addition, the degree of urbanisation may also impact voting behaviour, as those living in urban areas may be more likely to vote for parties that prioritise issues such as public transportation and affordable housing.

Finally, it is worth noting that while class may remain an important factor in determining voting behaviour, its influence may vary depending on the context. In some countries or regions, such as Scandinavia, class may have a stronger influence on voting patterns, while in others, such as the United States, other factors such as race and ethnicity may be more important. Ultimately, a nuanced understanding of the factors that shape voting behaviour is necessary in order to accurately evaluate the role of class in this process.
Reply 5
Original post by Quyoon42
One such factor is age. Younger voters, for example, may be more likely to vote for parties that prioritise issues such as climate change and social justice, while older voters may be more likely to prioritise issues such as the economy and national security.


Younger voters lack perspective and life experience and will vote for whoever gets into their mindset the best
That is why politicians want to lower the age at which young people can vote.

Younger voters are indoctrinated from school age through state and higher education with the Government and educational 'fashionable' agendas of the day. So naturally it follows if political parties reflect the same agendas young voters will align toward them.

Politicians of certain parties cynically want the younger vote - ply them with 'free' travel, 'free' education, 'free' benefits and they know they then have the 'younger' voter eating out of their hands 'we will look after you' - You can trust our party

Tell a lie enough times and it becomes the truth?
Reply 6
guys thank u for ur replies but i need a point FOR class not AGAINST
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 7
It would depend how you categorise class and what attributes you feel each category of class has to make them vote for a particular party societal structure.

A
B
C
D

???

If you are socially dependent on the state to live you will vote for the political party that maintains your cash and benefit flow with the least interference or aspiration in return?

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