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    (Original post by TheNihilist)
    Were all clearing places for BSc Economics offered to International students for Queen Mary's? What about joint Economics BSc degrees, are all offers 280 UCAS points with A in Mathematics?

    If the worst case senario was to happen, I might take a gap year, retake A2 modules and reapply. Hopefully Queen Mary's Uni might be lenient in clearing this year... Well, hope for the best. Thank you.
    No, they were open to UK/Home students as far as I was aware. However, you will find that in Clearing year after year, Economics at more reputable unis tend to be reserved only for International students these days. (I'm guessing it's because there is more money involved...which is a shame for UK/Home students).
    Unfortunately, the 280 points with an A in maths were required for the Joint honour degrees too.
    As long as you plan what to do 'if' you take a gap-year, then all is good. It is the worst thing ever if you find out on the day that you are 'suddenly' going to be taking a year out with 'nothing lined up/planned'. The unexpected outcome ..
    I wouldn't get your hopes up about QM though as they have tons of Maths degrees (single & joint) that seem to be the last to be filled in Clearing, as nobody wants to do them. Because of this, if you do better in Maths A Level, they may try to divert you away from Economics to the Maths department to try and fill in these 'unwanted' degrees that they are obviously desperate to fill. This is because Economics is more popular and they know for sure that there are many students lined up who want to do it, in comparison to the Maths degrees.
    However, please do not feel that you are obliged to take up a Maths degree if offered. Maths at degree level is not the same as A Level Maths (where you only needed to know how to use equations/techniques etc.). For degree Maths, you actually have to be able to understand the meaning behind it all. Just thought you might like to be aware of that so that you don't dive in and drown as it'll be a shame to come out of uni with a rubbish honours.

    Hope all this helps
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    Any chance anybody knows the Economics 1st year weekly timetable at queens??

    Thanks
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    (Original post by partoftheweekend)
    Any chance anybody knows the Economics 1st year weekly timetable at queens??

    Thanks
    No, because this is the Queen Mary forum. No idea what this Queen's is. You were looking for the Queen's University Belfast forum, perhaps? :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    No, because this is the Queen Mary forum. No idea what this Queen's is. You were looking for the Queen's University Belfast forum, perhaps? :dontknow:
    Very witty and clever, well done. Got a real answer now?
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    (Original post by partoftheweekend)
    Very witty and clever, well done. Got a real answer now?
    You're welcome.

    I've logged into the College intranet, which modules are you taking?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    You're welcome.

    I've logged into the College intranet, which modules are you taking?
    *ECN113 Principles of Economics
    ECN114 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1
    ECN112 Spreadsheets and Data in Economics
    ECN102 World Economy

    Thanks
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    (Original post by partoftheweekend)
    *ECN113 Principles of Economics
    ECN114 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1
    ECN112 Spreadsheets and Data in Economics
    ECN102 World Economy

    Thanks
    I'm not sure if this is for this year or last year. Use it as a general guideline, timetables don't really change that much.


    ECN113

    ECN113 Principles of Economics

    1 unit(s) Level 1 Semester A Monday 11-1pm

    This course will be an introduction to economic reasoning and analysis. No prior knowledge of economics is necessary. The course will cover standard topics such as: demand, supply and price in consumer markets; demand, supply and price in labour markets: returns to education, the New Deal; competitive equilibrium: optimality; trade; market power; price discrimination, oligopoly, government policy; externalities and the environment; public goods, taxes and free-riding; globalisation; growth.

    PrerequisitesNone

    Contact time One 2 hour lecture and one one-hour class per week

    Assessment 0% of the final mark will depend on the final exam (2-hour written examination) in the summer. The remaining 30% of the final mark will depend on coursework. The marked coursework will consist of a number of weekly homework exercises (10 %), news article presentations (10 %), and one intermediate test (10%). Weekly homework exercises: These will be announced during the lectures, and details will be posted on the ECN113 page on the web. These assignments consist of a number of questions to be made in and submitted directly from MyEconLab. The deadlines will be announced during the lectures and mentioned in the homework assignment. Any non-submission or late submission will result in a zero score. There will be 12 of these assignment, and the best 10 will count. News article presentations: Each week one team of 2 (or 3) students will present a discussion of a news article. The presentation will summarise the article, answer the questions that come with it, and critically assess the article. Students will be assigned to a slot during the first week in class, and details will be posted on the ECN113 web-page. The titles of the articles will each time be announced one week in advance. Intermediate test: The intermediate test will take place on Monday 10 November at 11:00 in the Great Hall. The test (and the final exam as well) will be based on the material discussed and/or indicated in class (incl. the news articles). There will be no make-up for the intermediate test; a zero score being the result of a test not made. You should check the undergradutate handbook for the procedures to be followed in case of extenuating circumstances.

    Course convenor Professor Nick Vriend

    Lecturer Professor Nick Vriend

    Course aims Students should understand the basic principles of the economic approach to the real world

    Topic outline Throughout the term we will look at a whole range of concepts and analytical techniques to deal with the following topics: Demand and Supply, Households, Firms, Competitive Equilibrium, Imperfect Competition, The Role of Information, and Market Failures and Public Policy. A tentative time-table will follow soon.

    Preliminary reading Main texts (essential for the course):

    - Economics, 6th Ed., John Sloman, 2006, FT Prentice Hall; ISBN10: 1-4058-3514-1.

    - Economics Student Workbook, 6th Ed., John Sloman, Peter Smith, Mark Sutcliffe, 2006, FT Prentice Hall; ISBN10: 0-273-70517-2. Additional material:

    - MyEconLab Online Access Card (providing a 'hands-on' approach to economics). See the 'MyEconLab instructions' link on the ECN113 web-page for further details.

    Purchase information:

    The items listed above can be purchased as a package from John Smith's QM Mile End campus store.

    Web:

    The publisher has a web-site set up for the Sloman book. On this site you will find chapter overviews, case-studies, answers to in-text questions, economics news articles, a glossary of economics terms, interesting links,? multiple choice questions, etc. The link to this Sloman site will be available on the ECN113 page.

    Other recommended textbooks:

    - Many other Principles textbooks (see library).

    Strongly recommended books:

    - The Undercover Economist, by Tim Harford, Abacus, 2006.

    - The Logic of Life. Uncovering the New Economics of Everything, by Tim Harford, Little, Brown, 2008.

    - The Armchair Economist: Economics and Everyday Life, by Steven E. Landsburg, Simon & Schuster, 1995.

    - Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything,

    by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner, Penguin Books, 2006.


    ECN114

    ECN114 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1

    1 unit(s) Level 1 Semester A Thursday 4-6pm

    Topics include concept of a function; linear functions; simultaneous linear equations; quadratic functions; rational functions; the concept of a derivative; rules of differentiation; the inverse function; optimisation of a function of one variable; second and higher derivatives; partial differentiation - conditions for relative extremum of a function of two variables; differentials and derivatives; total differentials; implicit functions; exponential and logarithmic functions and their derivatives - logarithms and elasticity. A test (only to determine students' levels) will be held before the course begins. Students with unsatisfactory results in the pre-test will be required to attend support classes.

    PrerequisitesNone

    Contact time One 2 hour lecture per week, plus one hour class

    Assessment Two mid-term tests (10% and 20%), Final Examination (70%)

    Course convenor George Makedonis

    Lecturer George Makedonis

    Course aims This course introduces the basic mathematical methods that will be used throughout the degree. The aim is to help students acquire the mathematical skills that they need in order to read the less technical economic literature, at least, and so to function properly as economists and business analysts. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed.

    Topic outline

    1. Concept of a Function
    2. Simultaneous Linear Equations
    3. Quadratic Functions; Rational Functions
    4. The Concept of the Derivative
    5. Optimization of a Function of One Variable
    6. Partial Differentiation
    7. Differentials and Derivatives
    8. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
    9. Integrals; Indefinite, Definite and their Properties.
    10. Integration; by Parts and by Substitution.

    Preliminary reading Essential Readings

    1. G.Renshaw (2005), Maths for Economics, Oxford,?

    2. E.Dowling, Schaum's Outlines (1993), Mathematical Methods for Business and Economics, McGraw-Hill.

    3. K.Sydsaeter and P.Hammond (1995), Mathematics for Economic Analysis, Prentice Hall.

    4. K.Sydsaeter and P.Hammond (2002), Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis, Prentice Hall.

    5. K.Binmore and J.Davies (2001), Calculus: concepts and Methods, Cambridge.
    Further information
    Please contact the course convenor


    ECN112

    ECN112 Spreadsheets and Data in Economics

    1 unit(s) Level 1 Semester A Tuesday 4-6pm

    This course concentrates on practical work related to the analysis of the UK economy. The initial section develops the skills to use spreadsheets in the graphical and tabular presentation of data, and an awareness of the sources, methods of construction and limitations of economic data. Students will then undertake brief investigations (involving institutional arrangements as well as data presentation) on 3 specified topics, covering such issues as consumers? expenditure, government expenditure and, the measurement and interpretation of unemployment.

    PrerequisitesNone

    Contact time 2 hours of lectures, 1 hour of classes per week

    Assessment 70% exam, 30% coursework

    Course convenor Dr Guglielmo Volpe

    Lecturer Dr Guglielmo Volpe

    Course aims The main aim of the course is to provide an introduction to the practical application of statistical and mathematical techniques in economics. The course employs the Excel spreadsheet to facilitate the understanding of these techniques. Students learn the basics of Excel in the first few weeks and then cover a wide range of topics including algebraic models, financial mathematics and descriptive statistical methods. This course will supplement the more theoretical based courses in statistics and mathematics.

    Topic outline N/A

    Preliminary reading N/A

    Further information Please contact the course convenor


    ECN102

    ECN102 World Economy

    1 unit(s) Level 1 Semester A Thursday 1-3pm

    The aim of this module is to introduce the basic concepts and methods that economists employ to analyze economic growth and international trade. It will review and analyze the current macroeconomic issues and events from the perspective of the business community and policymakers, including: strategies for growth; causes of trade deficits; consequences of government deficits; short- and long-term effects of monetary policy; and the globalization of financial markets. The course will feature examples from both developed and developing countries to enhance knowledge of the world economy and skills in solving practical problems.

    PrerequisitesNone

    Contact time 2 hours per week lecture: 1 hour class

    Course convenor Rachel Male

    Lecturer Rachel Male

    Course aims N/A

    Topic outline N/A

    Preliminary reading N/A

    Further information Please contact the course organiser


    Did that help? :awesome:
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I'm not sure if this is for this year or last year. Use it as a general guideline, timetables don't really change that much.

    Did that help? :awesome:
    Genius, thank you thats perfect.
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    (Original post by partoftheweekend)
    Genius, thank you thats perfect.
    You're welcome :top:
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    I am going to pursue my second year of degree engineering in QMUL. Is it possible to apply in some other univeristy for the 3rd year...lyk..uni of manchester or ucl ?
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    Can someone tell me how the flat system works? Im in 36C, so is that room 36, flat C or something?
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    (Original post by chigz32)
    Can someone tell me how the flat system works? Im in 36C, so is that room 36, flat C or something?
    The other way around: flat 36, room C
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    (Original post by chigz32)
    Can someone tell me how the flat system works? Im in 36C, so is that room 36, flat C or something?
    yeah as doingmybest said, room C, flat 36.

    Is that Pooley House? My mate was there (incidentally also from Leicester...and he was guji, which by your username I assume you are lol)
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    (Original post by DeSiFiEd)
    yeah as doingmybest said, room C, flat 36.

    Is that Pooley House? My mate was there (incidentally also from Leicester...and he was guji, which by your username I assume you are lol)
    Nah, france house :p:
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    Can someone tell me what the social life is like at Queen Mary? Is there plenty of varied nights out and things to do? Or are the social activities catered to a particular type of person?
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    Does anyone know how much weight is given to each year on the economics courses? I was searching the QMUL website but couldn't find it myself

    Thanks
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    Hey random question, does anyone know if in France house [and in QMUL generally] there are ports to connect the tv to the rooftop aeriel or if we have to get indoor aeriels for TV's??
    HELP!
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    (Original post by damedame)
    Hey random question, does anyone know if in France house [and in QMUL generally] there are ports to connect the tv to the rooftop aeriel or if we have to get indoor aeriels for TV's??
    HELP!
    If I remember right France House was the only one that had ports for TV. You might as well get a £20 freeview box though? lol
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    (Original post by mysteryman)
    Can someone tell me what the social life is like at Queen Mary? Is there plenty of varied nights out and things to do? Or are the social activities catered to a particular type of person?
    As its London you basically have access to every type of social 'scene', there's different music nights at the SU too.

    I'm guessing your into alternative things?
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    (Original post by DeSiFiEd)
    As its London you basically have access to every type of social 'scene', there's different music nights at the SU too.

    I'm guessing your into alternative things?
    Hey thanks for the reply. Yeah mainly alternative music and the odd bit of pop I like. I was mainly concerned about the events at the SU being aimed at a certain sort of person but seems like they have a great variety. I was also concerned about meeting people etc as i'm going to be living at home just outside of London, but I don't think it will be much of a problem.
 
 
 
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