The Student Room Group

Should I eat intuitively even if it'll make me underweight?

Allow me to explain: I’m not intuitively eating, I’m FORCING myself every day as I have been for almost 6 years now. My stomach has hardly adapted to the increased food intake, I’m at a borderline healthy weight right now but it’s only by giving myself stomachaches. I take a tablespoon of olive oil every day and eat peanut butter, seeds, etc (all the right foods). However, my stomach hurts all the time and I can’t focus at work, on my studies etc (I’m 20, about to start uni).

So I have two choices:

1. Eat intuitively and allow my weight to just stabilise at a low point so that I can enjoy my life without discomfort... but then lose my period and be at risk of health issues when I’m older.

2. Keep forcing myself, keep giving myself stomachaches but at least then I'd be maintaining and keep my gym progress. But on the other hand, I'd not be able to study or THINK properly because food starts to take over my whole life whenever I try to maintain.

So it’s either "live in the moment or in the future", right?

Is anyone else dealing with this? I’m genuinely not sure which option to go for... I do understand that people here are not medical professionals, was just wondering if people with a similar issue tend to choose option 1 or 2...
Original post by Anonymous
Allow me to explain: I’m not intuitively eating, I’m FORCING myself every day as I have been for almost 6 years now. My stomach has hardly adapted to the increased food intake, I’m at a borderline healthy weight right now but it’s only by giving myself stomachaches. I take a tablespoon of olive oil every day and eat peanut butter, seeds, etc (all the right foods). However, my stomach hurts all the time and I can’t focus at work, on my studies etc (I’m 20, about to start uni).

So I have two choices:

1. Eat intuitively and allow my weight to just stabilise at a low point so that I can enjoy my life without discomfort... but then lose my period and be at risk of health issues when I’m older.

2. Keep forcing myself, keep giving myself stomachaches but at least then I'd be maintaining and keep my gym progress. But on the other hand, I'd not be able to study or THINK properly because food starts to take over my whole life whenever I try to maintain.

So it’s either "live in the moment or in the future", right?

Is anyone else dealing with this? I’m genuinely not sure which option to go for... I do understand that people here are not medical professionals, was just wondering if people with a similar issue tend to choose option 1 or 2...

I have a few follow-up questions.

- Do you squeeze all of your calories into 3 meals or do you spread 5 or 6 smaller meals out throughout the day?
- How long have you been having stomach aches?
- Do your stomach aches get worse after eating certain foods?
- Do you have any unusual digestive symptoms, such as constipation, if you eat certain foods or too much food in a day?
- If you eat less in a day, does the stomach pain go away?

The fact that you struggle to focus on anything except digestive discomfort could be indicative of a deeper health issue.
Reply 2
Original post by SagaciousSag
I have a few follow-up questions.

- Do you squeeze all of your calories into 3 meals or do you spread 5 or 6 smaller meals out throughout the day?
- How long have you been having stomach aches?
- Do your stomach aches get worse after eating certain foods?
- Do you have any unusual digestive symptoms, such as constipation, if you eat certain foods or too much food in a day?
- If you eat less in a day, does the stomach pain go away?

The fact that you struggle to focus on anything except digestive discomfort could be indicative of a deeper health issue.


Thanks so much for the response. I'll answer them in order:

1. I've tried having 3 moderate-sized meals and smaller snacks in between, but the snacks end up being forced. I've also tried squeezing all my calories into 3 larger meals throughout the day... either way, both methods produce discomfort, it doesn't seem to make a difference :frown:

2. I don't get stomach aches ALL the time, it's mostly just extreme discomfort that I can't redirect my focus from. It's been happening since this problem first started.

3. Hmm... I used to think so, but that doesn't seem to be the case anymore.

4. I do get constipated sometimes but I think that's the result of being too underweight. Or if I don't eat enough fruit. Haha

5. Oh definitely!

I've been to the doctors before and they did a few tests, nothing came up. But that was 5 or so years ago...
Reply 3
Original post by SagaciousSag
I have a few follow-up questions.

- Do you squeeze all of your calories into 3 meals or do you spread 5 or 6 smaller meals out throughout the day?
- How long have you been having stomach aches?
- Do your stomach aches get worse after eating certain foods?
- Do you have any unusual digestive symptoms, such as constipation, if you eat certain foods or too much food in a day?
- If you eat less in a day, does the stomach pain go away?

The fact that you struggle to focus on anything except digestive discomfort could be indicative of a deeper health issue.


Actually, following up from 4... yes, it sometimes is harder to eat normally after a day of eating beyond what is comfortable. My stomach ends up feeling kinda bad and it lasts a whole day after, or maybe more (for example, after overeating from a big lunch the day before).
Reply 4
Original post by Anonymous
Allow me to explain: I’m not intuitively eating, I’m FORCING myself every day as I have been for almost 6 years now. My stomach has hardly adapted to the increased food intake, I’m at a borderline healthy weight right now but it’s only by giving myself stomachaches. I take a tablespoon of olive oil every day and eat peanut butter, seeds, etc (all the right foods). However, my stomach hurts all the time and I can’t focus at work, on my studies etc (I’m 20, about to start uni).

So I have two choices:

1. Eat intuitively and allow my weight to just stabilise at a low point so that I can enjoy my life without discomfort... but then lose my period and be at risk of health issues when I’m older.

2. Keep forcing myself, keep giving myself stomachaches but at least then I'd be maintaining and keep my gym progress. But on the other hand, I'd not be able to study or THINK properly because food starts to take over my whole life whenever I try to maintain.

So it’s either "live in the moment or in the future", right?

Is anyone else dealing with this? I’m genuinely not sure which option to go for... I do understand that people here are not medical professionals, was just wondering if people with a similar issue tend to choose option 1 or 2...

How much are you eating? How much are you exercising? Obviously the more you exercise, the more food you'll need… would it be at all possible to reduce the amount/intensity of exercise you do? Doesn't need to be a massive reduction (so you shouldn't lose your gym progress :smile:) but it'll mean you are able to maintain without needing to consume quite so much (but still eat as much as reasonably possible).

Do you eat a lot of fruit and veg? Have you noticed any specific foods that cause particular discomfort, e.g. gluten? Might help to keep a food/symptom diary (including timings etc.) to see if you can spot any patterns?

If "eating intuitively" is going to make you underweight and risk problems later in life, then it's not a good option.

Probably best to speak to a GP hopefully you'll be able to get some proper medical advice specific to you, and maybe identify any food sensitivities/intolerances.
Reply 5
Original post by bl0bf1sh
How much are you eating? How much are you exercising? Obviously the more you exercise, the more food you'll need… would it be at all possible to reduce the amount/intensity of exercise you do? Doesn't need to be a massive reduction (so you shouldn't lose your gym progress :smile:) but it'll mean you are able to maintain without needing to consume quite so much (but still eat as much as reasonably possible).

Do you eat a lot of fruit and veg? Have you noticed any specific foods that cause particular discomfort, e.g. gluten? Might help to keep a food/symptom diary (including timings etc.) to see if you can spot any patterns?

If "eating intuitively" is going to make you underweight and risk problems later in life, then it's not a good option.

Probably best to speak to a GP hopefully you'll be able to get some proper medical advice specific to you, and maybe identify any food sensitivities/intolerances.


At the moment I'm eating an average of 1750-1800 calories a day (with extreme difficulty, as a 160cm, 46.8kg female) but I need around 1850-1900 per day to maintain. This is based off several tdee calculators where I've put in "moderate exercise". I keep losing around 0.4kg per month, even while I'm forcing myself, because the deficiency adds up over time.

I do try to eat lots of fruit, but mostly am getting 4 of my 5 a day because fruit is dense and low calorie... the thing is, I don't even know if there's a general food making me feel bad. It seems to be just general bad digestion!

Yeah... the doctors didn't pick anything up before but perhaps they might after it's been so long.
Reply 6
Original post by Anonymous
At the moment I'm eating an average of 1750-1800 calories a day (with extreme difficulty, as a 160cm, 46.8kg female) but I need around 1850-1900 per day to maintain. This is based off several tdee calculators where I've put in "moderate exercise". I keep losing around 0.4kg per month, even while I'm forcing myself, because the deficiency adds up over time.

I do try to eat lots of fruit, but mostly am getting 4 of my 5 a day because fruit is dense and low calorie... the thing is, I don't even know if there's a general food making me feel bad. It seems to be just general bad digestion!

Yeah... the doctors didn't pick anything up before but perhaps they might after it's been so long.

Take TDEE calculators with a massive pinch of salt they're not completely accurate and they don't know your body (I'm pretty sure I need a lot more than what it predicts for me). They can give a decent idea of where to start though. But ultimately your body is more than just a load of numbers, and to gain weight you'll need to eat a considerable amount more than your "maintenance".

Perhaps try eating less fruit, and replacing it with something physically smaller but more calorie-dense? Fruit is good, but you'll need an awful lot of it if you are trying to up your energy intake.
For example:
One of these fellas is 354 kcal; to get the equivalent energy from apples you'd need to eat approximately 7 apples.
Half a tub of ice cream is a lot easier to polish off than, say, 3 kg of melon.
You get the gist. Obviously, fruit is still good, important for the vitamins and minerals and fibre and all that, but just in terms of energy a few swaps can make things easier.
Something like Greek yoghurt (full fat), granola (plenty of it), banana and "toppings" (honey, peanut butter, nuts, seeds etc.) would pack in a lot more than, say, some sad watery porridge with a few blueberries.
And ignore any stingy "portion sizes" written on labels you can have more than that!

What does a typical day of food look like for you at the moment?

I don't know the nature of your stomach aches, but there are a number of medical conditions linked to stomach pain. Again, probably best to see a doctor (i.e., book an appointment!) to see if you can get anything diagnosed or ruled out, rather than trying to find answers relevant to you from Google, TSR, and the rest of the internet :smile:
Reply 7
Original post by bl0bf1sh
Take TDEE calculators with a massive pinch of salt they're not completely accurate and they don't know your body (I'm pretty sure I need a lot more than what it predicts for me). They can give a decent idea of where to start though. But ultimately your body is more than just a load of numbers, and to gain weight you'll need to eat a considerable amount more than your "maintenance".

Perhaps try eating less fruit, and replacing it with something physically smaller but more calorie-dense? Fruit is good, but you'll need an awful lot of it if you are trying to up your energy intake.
For example:
One of these fellas is 354 kcal; to get the equivalent energy from apples you'd need to eat approximately 7 apples.
Half a tub of ice cream is a lot easier to polish off than, say, 3 kg of melon.
You get the gist. Obviously, fruit is still good, important for the vitamins and minerals and fibre and all that, but just in terms of energy a few swaps can make things easier.
Something like Greek yoghurt (full fat), granola (plenty of it), banana and "toppings" (honey, peanut butter, nuts, seeds etc.) would pack in a lot more than, say, some sad watery porridge with a few blueberries.
And ignore any stingy "portion sizes" written on labels you can have more than that!

What does a typical day of food look like for you at the moment?

I don't know the nature of your stomach aches, but there are a number of medical conditions linked to stomach pain. Again, probably best to see a doctor (i.e., book an appointment!) to see if you can get anything diagnosed or ruled out, rather than trying to find answers relevant to you from Google, TSR, and the rest of the internet :smile:


Yeah, it's just that I seem to get a bit constipated without regularly eating fruit, haha!

Well, I love all that stuff you just suggested. I'm actually a really big foodie, but clearly just not getting enough of it. Lol

Here's what a day looks like atm:

Breakfast: 500-600 cals, usually 300ml whole milk + 50g porridge oats and 15-25g of peanut butter, cacao powder, or coconut flour (literally trying whatever I can, breakfast is my favourite), with an apple. Sometimes add sunflower seeds too.

Lunch: Anywhere from 350-400 ish. For some reason my stomach takes lunch the worst. Usually a ham sandwich with 50/50 (or pumpkin seed) bread with lots of butter. If I have more of an appetite, it'll be tahini or 2 fried eggs instead of a meat filling. Always with cucumber on the side

Dinner: 500-600 or so. Things like roast chicken and potato croquettes, spaghetti or chicken risotto with grated cheese, jacket potato, or salmon fried in olive oil.

After dinner: a small piece of chocolate, usually only 50-90 cals because by that point I'm too full to eat much else.

Snacks: One tablespoon of olive oil taken daily, RELIGIOUSLY. Lol. An extra 120 or so

I'm really bad with snacks because they often ruin my next meal :frown: but on a good day I might have a piece of fruit or a snack bar, or some yoghurt, for an extra 200-300 calories.

Each day varies from anywhere between 1550 to almost 1950 calories. On the better days, I'm either force-feeding myself or have managed to get a pizza or a takeaway (rare because those are kinda expensive)

Perhaps I should go back to the doctors. They did a few inconclusive tests before (like an ultrasound etc) but perhaps there's more they can investigate.

Woah I'm so sorry for such a long response. Thank you :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
At the moment I'm eating an average of 1750-1800 calories a day (with extreme difficulty, as a 160cm, 46.8kg female) but I need around 1850-1900 per day to maintain. This is based off several tdee calculators where I've put in "moderate exercise". I keep losing around 0.4kg per month, even while I'm forcing myself, because the deficiency adds up over time.

I do try to eat lots of fruit, but mostly am getting 4 of my 5 a day because fruit is dense and low calorie... the thing is, I don't even know if there's a general food making me feel bad. It seems to be just general bad digestion!

Yeah... the doctors didn't pick anything up before but perhaps they might after it's been so long.


Have you been taking any anti-inflammatory medication, eg aspirin or ibruprofen?
Have you been checked recently for H Pylori stomach ulcers? It's one of those where you should go to your GP, if you haven't recently and describe your stomach pains and they may well put you on a course of the triple-drug anti-biotic H pylori treatment. Which is effective in 92% of cases, compared to 56% of patients given 2 servings of broccoli sprouts per day.

The big priority is to sort out the stomach pains. It's quite possible that this will be easy to do (if it's stomach ulcers caused by aspirin or H pylori).
Then after that it's a case of changing your relationship with food. Food should be something that you enjoy and look forward to. Something where you're not obsessively counting calories. One where you listen to your body in that you eat when you're hungry and stop eating when you are pleasantly full but not overstretched.
And then it's a case of - ideally - sorting out your nutrition as far as is reasonably possible for better feelings of wellbeing in the short term and better long term health outlook.

When you go to uni, look to be the one person in your kitchen or halls that buys proper fresh food ingredients and cooks to a reasonable standard.
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 9
Original post by Anonymous
Yeah, it's just that I seem to get a bit constipated without regularly eating fruit, haha!

Well, I love all that stuff you just suggested. I'm actually a really big foodie, but clearly just not getting enough of it. Lol

Here's what a day looks like atm:

Breakfast: 500-600 cals, usually 300ml whole milk + 50g porridge oats and 15-25g of peanut butter, cacao powder, or coconut flour (literally trying whatever I can, breakfast is my favourite), with an apple. Sometimes add sunflower seeds too.

Lunch: Anywhere from 350-400 ish. For some reason my stomach takes lunch the worst. Usually a ham sandwich with 50/50 (or pumpkin seed) bread with lots of butter. If I have more of an appetite, it'll be tahini or 2 fried eggs instead of a meat filling. Always with cucumber on the side

Dinner: 500-600 or so. Things like roast chicken and potato croquettes, spaghetti or chicken risotto with grated cheese, jacket potato, or salmon fried in olive oil.

After dinner: a small piece of chocolate, usually only 50-90 cals because by that point I'm too full to eat much else.

Snacks: One tablespoon of olive oil taken daily, RELIGIOUSLY. Lol. An extra 120 or so

I'm really bad with snacks because they often ruin my next meal :frown: but on a good day I might have a piece of fruit or a snack bar, or some yoghurt, for an extra 200-300 calories.

Each day varies from anywhere between 1550 to almost 1950 calories. On the better days, I'm either force-feeding myself or have managed to get a pizza or a takeaway (rare because those are kinda expensive)

Perhaps I should go back to the doctors. They did a few inconclusive tests before (like an ultrasound etc) but perhaps there's more they can investigate.

Woah I'm so sorry for such a long response. Thank you :smile:

I totally get you with the fruit and constipation thing, and from the looks of it you're eating a sensible amount of it :smile: You could maybe try swapping to more calorie-dense fruits, such as bananas, avocados, or dried fruit? Porridge with banana, sultanas and peanut butter (plus some extra toppings) is one of my favourites!

Spoiler


If you're not too bad in the mornings, perhaps you could try adding an extra course, e.g. yoghurt or toast? Also things like being very generous with the peanut butter, and adding more things to your porridge like honey and granola.

Spoiler


Your fibre doesn't have to come from just fruit! e.g. grains, vegetables (although, like fruit, they're often not very calorically-dense), legumes.
Edamame beans, for example, make a pretty tasty snack or side (either as they are, or with a bit of a sauce (e.g. sweet chilli sauce, soy sauce, peanut butter and/or sesame oil, and ginger, or any combination)); or stick a few into your risotto or pasta or something?

Overall, breakfast looks good, dinner's decent (could be bigger imo, but a lot of it just comes down to preference), and like you said lunch could be bigger. Do you have thick slices of bread? Could you add an extra condiment like mayo? Add in some cheese or cream cheese? If you "toastie" it (toastie maker, or fry in a pan with butter, or whatever) it kind of makes the sandwich feel a bit smaller :smile:

Timing-wise, could you adjust the times you eat (e.g. an earlier breakfast (gives the opportunity for a second breakfast!) or a slightly later dinner) to make room for a bit more of a snack without feeling like it ruins your next meal? How do drinks such as smoothies and milkshakes affect your appetite? You can stick pretty much anything into a smoothie, like peanut butter and yoghurt, and also gets in a bit of fibre to help keep things moving!


Do book an appointment with a GP you might be able to get your bloods tested, which will give a much better picture of what's going on inside and hopefully help identify or rule out any issues :smile:
Reply 10
Original post by Anonymous
Yeah, it's just that I seem to get a bit constipated without regularly eating fruit, haha!

Here's what a day looks like atm:

Breakfast: 500-600 cals, usually 300ml whole milk + 50g porridge oats and 15-25g of peanut butter, cacao powder, or coconut flour (literally trying whatever I can, breakfast is my favourite), with an apple. Sometimes add sunflower seeds too.

Lunch: Anywhere from 350-400 ish. For some reason my stomach takes lunch the worst. Usually a ham sandwich with 50/50 (or pumpkin seed) bread with lots of butter. If I have more of an appetite, it'll be tahini or 2 fried eggs instead of a meat filling. Always with cucumber on the side

Dinner: 500-600 or so. Things like roast chicken and potato croquettes, spaghetti or chicken risotto with grated cheese, jacket potato, or salmon fried in olive oil.

After dinner: a small piece of chocolate, usually only 50-90 cals because by that point I'm too full to eat much else.

Snacks: One tablespoon of olive oil taken daily, RELIGIOUSLY. Lol. An extra 120 or so

Where's the veg in that diet? If lunch is a problem, try salads. Are you drinking enough?
Original post by Anonymous
Yeah, it's just that I seem to get a bit constipated without regularly eating fruit, haha!

Well, I love all that stuff you just suggested. I'm actually a really big foodie, but clearly just not getting enough of it. Lol

Here's what a day looks like atm:

Breakfast: 500-600 cals, usually 300ml whole milk + 50g porridge oats and 15-25g of peanut butter, cacao powder, or coconut flour (literally trying whatever I can, breakfast is my favourite), with an apple. Sometimes add sunflower seeds too.

Lunch: Anywhere from 350-400 ish. For some reason my stomach takes lunch the worst. Usually a ham sandwich with 50/50 (or pumpkin seed) bread with lots of butter. If I have more of an appetite, it'll be tahini or 2 fried eggs instead of a meat filling. Always with cucumber on the side

Dinner: 500-600 or so. Things like roast chicken and potato croquettes, spaghetti or chicken risotto with grated cheese, jacket potato, or salmon fried in olive oil.

After dinner: a small piece of chocolate, usually only 50-90 cals because by that point I'm too full to eat much else.

Snacks: One tablespoon of olive oil taken daily, RELIGIOUSLY. Lol. An extra 120 or so

I'm really bad with snacks because they often ruin my next meal :frown: but on a good day I might have a piece of fruit or a snack bar, or some yoghurt, for an extra 200-300 calories.

Each day varies from anywhere between 1550 to almost 1950 calories. On the better days, I'm either force-feeding myself or have managed to get a pizza or a takeaway (rare because those are kinda expensive)

Perhaps I should go back to the doctors. They did a few inconclusive tests before (like an ultrasound etc) but perhaps there's more they can investigate.

Woah I'm so sorry for such a long response. Thank you :smile:


There's not enough variety in your diet.
Don't have the same things for breakfast / lunch / dinner every day.

Whole milk is junk food. Too much fat, zero fibre.

Ham, which is processed meat is carcinogenic. It's junk food. Zero fibre.
Butter is junk food. Too much fat, zero fibre. May have too much salt.

Fried eggs are junk food. Too much cholesterol. Zero fibre.

Roast chicken is junk food, but not as junky as ham. Too much fat, zero fibre. Probably too many pollutants in the chicken.

Potato croquettes are junk food. Almost no fibre, too much salt, too much fat.
Spaghetti is semi junk food, especially if it's not wholewheat spaghetti. Due to a lack of fibre and lack of phytonutrients.

The rice in your risotto. American rice may have too much arsenic in it. Whole grain rice is better. The rice that most people eat lacks fibre.

Salmon. Likely to have too many carcinogenic chemicals in it. Zero fibre.

Snack bars. Junk food. Too much sugar, salt, fat.

Yoghurt. Zero fibre. May have too much fat and sugar.

Pizza is junk food. Too much salt, fat. Almost no fibre.

Olive oil. Zero fibre. Eat whole, unsalted olives instead.

Overall what you've been eating is better than many people in the UK. But it's a long way from being healthy.
Due to a lack of fibre. Lack of variety of unprocessed plant based foods. Too much junk and semi junk.

Add beans (not the heinz variety, self cooked beans) legumes, whole grains for more fibre.
Eat rye and barley as well as oats.
Add ground flax seeds for the cancer protection.
More herbs and spices for the phytonutrients and to enhance flavour.
More fruit, especially more berries.
More cruciferous vegetables. And more veggies in general. All the different varieties.
Add brocoli sprouts for the sulforaphane (grow them yourself).
More nuts. Unsalted. All the different varieties.
More green leaves. Fresh raw. Or lightly cooked for stuff like Kale if you find it more palatable cooked.
Substitute sweet potato for a chunk of your regular potato.
For stuff like rhubarb and gooseberries that are too sour unsweetened, use unrefined sugar instead of refined.
Beetroot is good for an uplift in stamina.
Aim to eat stuff that's in season.
Forage for free indgredients, such as nettles (young leaves, cooked for no sting, eg in soup) . Blackberries in late August to September.
Add miscelaneous unprocessed plant stuff, such as edible flowers, eg Nasturtium (for the lutein). Or edible seaweed.
Original post by Anonymous
Allow me to explain: I’m not intuitively eating, I’m FORCING myself every day as I have been for almost 6 years now. My stomach has hardly adapted to the increased food intake, I’m at a borderline healthy weight right now but it’s only by giving myself stomachaches. I take a tablespoon of olive oil every day and eat peanut butter, seeds, etc (all the right foods). However, my stomach hurts all the time and I can’t focus at work, on my studies etc (I’m 20, about to start uni).

So I have two choices:

1. Eat intuitively and allow my weight to just stabilise at a low point so that I can enjoy my life without discomfort... but then lose my period and be at risk of health issues when I’m older.

2. Keep forcing myself, keep giving myself stomachaches but at least then I'd be maintaining and keep my gym progress. But on the other hand, I'd not be able to study or THINK properly because food starts to take over my whole life whenever I try to maintain.

So it’s either "live in the moment or in the future", right?

Is anyone else dealing with this? I’m genuinely not sure which option to go for... I do understand that people here are not medical professionals, was just wondering if people with a similar issue tend to choose option 1 or 2...

I would definitely recommend seeing your GP and discussing again if you haven't had it looked at for 5 years. Unintentional weight loss, appetite issues, and stomach aches may be symptoms of other issues rather than just that you are generally not someone who gets hungry often. They may also be able to recommend dietary supplements and so on to help with maintaining a healthy weight.
Original post by Dunnig Kruger
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This isn't someone who is looking to try and lose weight or get swole, the OP clearly stated that they have trouble maintaining a health weight. Things like whole milk are perfectly reasonable for that situation and may well be one of the things helping provide the crucial caloric intake they need now. Also the entire concept of branding large swathes of food as "good" or "bad" is completely out of touch with the reality of how the body processes food and also something that commonly triggers eating disorders in people.

Food is not inherently "good" or "bad" unless it's obviously non-food or poisonous. You can eat anything and remain healthy if you eat in moderation - recognising that the amounts that would be considered "in moderation" will vary from food stuff to food stuff. Eating pizza now and then isn't going to kill you. Having ham in a sandwich at lunch isn't unhealthy. Etc, etc

And if they're reporting consistent constipation clearly increasing fibre intake isn't the solution to all the problems and may well make the constipation issues worse...
(edited 11 months ago)
Original post by Dunnig Kruger
Complete and utter cobblers!

What we eat and drink are the most important things in terms of our short term feelings of physical well-being.

The original poster gets constipated. A lot more fibre in what she eats would almost certainly solve the constipation. The constipation is her digestive system's natural reaction to the low fibre stuff she has been eating.

Most of the leading causes of death in the UK are linked to long term lifestyle dietary habits.

Claiming that you can eat anything and remain healthy is straight out of the Tobacco Industry Playbook. This playbook is used by industries that make profits from junk food.

I think that it's quite disgusting that you as a "Univerisities Forum Helper" member of this forum are repeating Tobacco Industry Playbook Propaganda.

We are not talking about having 1 pizza and 1 ham sandwhich once a month. We are talking about sub-optimum eating every day in the original poster's case.
The lack of fibre and lack of phytonutrients is there every day for the original poster.

If the original poster wants to carry on eating and drinking whatever they want. That's fine by me. Just as it's fine by me if anyone smokes.
However, I will not condone anyone coming out with "Smoking / junk food in moderation is fine and you can live a long and healthy life if you do so" type rhetoric.

It's possible to be slim and to die early from the results of poor dietary lifestyle. I've seen it myself.
EG People that run marathons regularly on a typical UK / USA diet are prime examples of this. You'd think that being slim and exercising a lot would help to increase longevity. But it doesn't. The opposite happens. Statistically they die early.

My advice wasn't aimed at weight change. It was aimed at maximising the short, medium and long term health of the original poster. Which clearly isn't very good, as indicated by the stomach pains, loss of periods, constipation.

You are not a dietitian or nutritionist. Nothing is "disgusting" about what artful_lounger has mentioned. The original poster is making do with what they can tolerate and what they can afford, and it is true that you can consume all food groups in moderation without grave consequences. Nothing to do with smoking and no reason to insult other members of the forum.

The main point is that because the original poster has been dealing with these issues for so long, you shouldn't jump to conclusions about what the problem is and comment arbitrary solutions. A GP is unlikely to jump to the fact that the original poster is experiencing stomach ulcers because of stomach pain and a loss of appetite. Instead, a series of tests will be performed (deficiencies, stool tests) to determine what the problem is, and then solutions can be provided.

Also, a 'one size fits all' approach to the original poster's problem is not appropriate. For example, fibre can relieve constipation, yes, but it can also provide a feeling of fullness and make it more difficult for this person to eat the necessary calories in a day. Considering you are not a qualified medical professional, I would suggest that you keep your "optimum eating" and nutritional advice to yourself and instead encourage the original poster to seek one's advice if you have the intention of "maximising" their "short, medium and long term health".
Literally none of what the OP has stated they eat is "junk food", with the exception of the takeaway pizza which they even noted is rare and thus well within moderation. Your post against what you deem "junk food" (which is in fact, not) is out of place and inappropriate.

You've also completely ignored the OPs stated aim and point of this thread about maintaining a healthy and stable weight in the face of unintentional weight loss, to instead evangelise about your beliefs regarding food, which is also inappropriate.
(edited 11 months ago)
Original post by SagaciousSag
You are not a dietitian or nutritionist. Nothing is "disgusting" about what artful_lounger has mentioned. The original poster is making do with what they can tolerate and what they can afford, and it is true that you can consume all food groups in moderation without grave consequences. Nothing to do with smoking and no reason to insult other members of the forum.

The main point is that because the original poster has been dealing with these issues for so long, you shouldn't jump to conclusions about what the problem is and comment arbitrary solutions. A GP is unlikely to jump to the fact that the original poster is experiencing stomach ulcers because of stomach pain and a loss of appetite. Instead, a series of tests will be performed (deficiencies, stool tests) to determine what the problem is, and then solutions can be provided.

Also, a 'one size fits all' approach to the original poster's problem is not appropriate. For example, fibre can relieve constipation, yes, but it can also provide a feeling of fullness and make it more difficult for this person to eat the necessary calories in a day. Considering you are not a qualified medical professional, I would suggest that you keep your "optimum eating" and nutritional advice to yourself and instead encourage the original poster to seek one's advice if you have the intention of "maximising" their "short, medium and long term health".

"You are not a dietitian or nutritionist."
Really? That's news to me!

BTW do you know how long doctors in the UK, spend on average studying nutrtion during their medical education and training?


The original post says:
"Is anyone else dealing with this? I’m genuinely not sure which option to go for... I do understand that people here are not medical professionals, was just wondering if people with a similar issue tend to choose option 1 or 2... "

I have done my best to pass on my experience and knowledge on this area in a way that will be most helpful to the original poster.
And with it being based as much as possible on medical science and not on Junk Food Industry Tobacco Playbook Propaganda.
Can you not see the parallels between what the Tobacco Industry did 100 years ago, and what the Junk Food industry is doing today? History is great for understanding what is going on today.
Original post by artful_lounger
Literally none of what the OP has stated they eat is "junk food", with the exception of the takeaway pizza which they even noted is rare and thus well within moderation. Your bizarre crusade against what you deem "junk food" (which is in fact, not) is out of place and inappropriate.

You've also completely ignored the OPs stated aim and point of this thread about maintaining a healthy and stable weight in the face of unintentional weight loss, to instead evangelise about your beliefs regarding food, which is also inappropriate.


Lies!

As covered in my previous post.
Original post by Dunnig Kruger
BTW do you know how long doctors in the UK, spend on average studying nutrtion during their medical education and training?

I don't think you're a doctor, considering you said eggs "are not healthy" and chicken "is one of the more unhealthy things you can eat", which is quite different from the Eatwell Guide.

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