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Adult resit to go from 4 to 6+

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Reply 20
Original post by Euapp
Congratulations !!

Thanks. All the hard work is hopefully starting to pay off.


I had a thought today to play the You Tube complete GSCEs maths how toos while doing the housework. It should work on a subliminal level- going into the subconscious mind etc. A bit like sleeping while listening, it may also work when you meditate 🤔. I’m trying to study smarter not harder. Exams are memory recall tests and not test of your intelligence.
Reply 21
Original post by Heatherthebat
Thanks. All the hard work is hopefully starting to pay off.


I had a thought today to play the You Tube complete GSCEs maths how toos while doing the housework. It should work on a subliminal level- going into the subconscious mind etc. A bit like sleeping while listening, it may also work when you meditate 🤔. I’m trying to study smarter not harder. Exams are memory recall tests and not test of your intelligence.

Studying smarter is definitely the way to go. To get a good grade in GCSE maths you need to recognise what they are asking and then applyi the rules. However if you actually understand the how and why behind the concepts, it does make things easier if you wish to take maths further.
Reply 22
Original post by Euapp
Studying smarter is definitely the way to go. To get a good grade in GCSE maths you need to recognise what they are asking and then applyi the rules. However if you actually understand the how and why behind the concepts, it does make things easier if you wish to take maths further.


What do you mean by 'apply the rules'? That's not how to approach a problem.
Reply 23
Original post by Muttley79
What do you mean by 'apply the rules'? That's not how to approach a problem.

I was just going against the idea of maths being purely a memory recall subject which OP had stated, and meant quite simply that each question requires a certain approach. OP was insinuating that memory was sufficient whereas I was saying that whilst you can learn the method for doing certain kinds of questions, and at GCSE achieve a reasonable grade, understanding the why is essential if you want to go further. So no need to get upset, I’m not trying to tell you how to do your job!!
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 24
Original post by Euapp
I was just going against the idea of maths being purely a memory recall subject which OP had stated, and meant quite simply that each question requires a certain approach. OP was insinuating that memory was sufficient whereas I was saying that whilst you can learn the method for doing certain kinds of questions, and at GCSE achieve a reasonable grade, understanding the why is essential if you want to go further. So no need to get upset, I’m not trying to tell you how to do your job!!


No you are wrong - many questions can be approached in different ways - it's the best students tht find the most efficient way.
Reply 25
Original post by Muttley79
No you are wrong - many questions can be approached in different ways - it's the best students tht find the most efficient way.

OK one of a number of approaches!! The point that I was getting at, but you don’t seem to have understood, is that you can only go so far in the study of maths if you have to memorise every method or approach but haven’t understood the logic behind the said approaches!!
Reply 26
Sorry OP. My intention wasn’t to derail this thread.
CONGRATULATIONS 🎉
Keep up the good work. It will pay off!
Reply 27
Original post by Euapp
OK one of a number of approaches!! The point that I was getting at, but you don’t seem to have understood, is that you can only go so far in the study of maths if you have to memorise every method or approach but haven’t understood the logic behind the said approaches!!


No I think you misunderstand. The OP just needs a grade 6 not to study the subject further ...
Reply 28
Original post by Muttley79
No I think you misunderstand. The OP just needs a grade 6 not to study the subject further ...

I know!! But that doesn’t change the fact that she said exams ( not just GCSE’s ) were just a memory game which I disagree with. Anyway it’s irrelevant to this thread so I abandon.
Reply 29
Weekly update. I’ve concentrated on Algebra this week and I’ve added flash cards to the mix.

Todays AQA paper 1 higher I scored a grade 7.

Onwards and upwards.
Reply 30
I attempted all three past papers today in one day. I was 17 short of grade 6. I dropped drastically on paper 2. Probably due to not using a calculator for 5 years. Hopefully I can work on this and get a higher grade.

A lot of the question the method was so close I was getting those marks. Onwards and upwards.


PS as a mature student I find doing 90% of the curriculum one will never need or use rather annoying. The Government really does need to rethink it at GCSE level.
Reply 31
Original post by Heatherthebat
I attempted all three past papers today in one day. I was 17 short of grade 6. I dropped drastically on paper 2. Probably due to not using a calculator for 5 years. Hopefully I can work on this and get a higher grade.

A lot of the question the method was so close I was getting those marks. Onwards and upwards.


PS as a mature student I find doing 90% of the curriculum one will never need or use rather annoying. The Government really does need to rethink it at GCSE level.


The spec was revised recently - remember this is Mathematics not Numeracy ... it's really about problem solving and applying knowledge.
Reply 32
Weekly update. I’ve been working by on The method I posted from the Ivy League student. It’s paid off so far. I did a mock paper 2 which previously I was scoring 18, I now scored 30. The questions I covered 90% I got correct and the other 10% I was still iffy with the methodology. It’s not a quick fix but does work.

I’ll keep working on it until the end of next week and decide on the Nov resit. As I have to pay a hefty £225 to resit at a centre as a private adult student, I may go for the May 2024 exams.
Reply 33
Original post by Heatherthebat
Weekly update. I’ve been working by on The method I posted from the Ivy League student. It’s paid off so far. I did a mock paper 2 which previously I was scoring 18, I now scored 30. The questions I covered 90% I got correct and the other 10% I was still iffy with the methodology. It’s not a quick fix but does work.

I’ll keep working on it until the end of next week and decide on the Nov resit. As I have to pay a hefty £225 to resit at a centre as a private adult student, I may go for the May 2024 exams.


Well done. Keep up the good work!👍🏻
Reply 34
I tried my first set of Excel papers today and had a total disaster. I dropped from a high 6 average to a low 5. The marking scheme was like reading Chinese. I definitely won’t be doing that board.

The 29 Sept is the cut off day for private students without paying extra costs. Now I have to do another AQA complete set to see if I can get a 7 - if so I’ll book a place for Nov. I really didn’t fancy doing the papers in June.
The weekly update:

I’ve been to get points just short of 7s and mid 6s after all 3 past papers.

I do a paper then watch the walk through by Mr Thompson’s Ed Tech on You Tube. I’ve found his tutorials very easy to understand.

I’ve also included acronyms and visualisations to remember some of the theory;

O ARIES types of triangles
CAR SOR for types of angles
PaRROTS for types of quadrilaterals
CATS for parallel line angles

I’ve also begun work on visual memory for fractions into decimals - a pole with a washing line. The pole has the image for the fraction and the washing line for bits to remind you of the decimal. Just be over the top with it.
Original post by Heatherthebat
The weekly update:

I’ve been to get points just short of 7s and mid 6s after all 3 past papers.

I do a paper then watch the walk through by Mr Thompson’s Ed Tech on You Tube. I’ve found his tutorials very easy to understand.

I’ve also included acronyms and visualisations to remember some of the theory;

O ARIES types of triangles
CAR SOR for types of angles
PaRROTS for types of quadrilaterals
CATS for parallel line angles

I’ve also begun work on visual memory for fractions into decimals - a pole with a washing line. The pole has the image for the fraction and the washing line for bits to remind you of the decimal. Just be over the top with it.

What do they stand for? A number line is commonly used now
OARIES- Obtuse, Acute, Right angled, Isosceles, Equilateral, Scalene

CAR SOR Corresponding, Acute, Right angled, Supplementary and Reflex

PaRRoTS K Parallelogram, Rectangle, Rhombus, Trapezium, Square and Kite

CATS Corresponding, Alternate, Transversal, Supplementary
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by Heatherthebat
OARIES- Obtuse, Acute, Right angled, Isosceles, Equilateral, Scalene

CAR SOR Corresponding, Acute, Right angled, Supplementary and Reflex

PaRRoTS K Parallelogram, Rectangle, Rhombus, Trapezium, Square and Kite

CATS Corresponding, Alternate, Transversal, Supplementary

Transversal is the name of a straight line crossing a pair of parallel lines not used in England for angles

Isosceles trapezium?

Don't see what CAR SOR does - when do you use it?
(edited 9 months ago)
A lot are used for the name that angle, or triangle questions. They are usually the 1 markers in AQA. Every mark adds up - with me anyway.

Exam decision: as I was scoring a 6 average with my biased marking I’ve decided to sit the exams in May June next year. If I can score at least a 7 average then hopefully I won’t drop below a 6 when marked by a teacher.

I’ve worked out my study schedule so I have 9 weeks each for algebra and geometry; meanwhile 4 weeks each for the rest. It’s spaced over the coming weeks to space repetition each topic. Thus say 2 weeks Algebra then two weeks geometry etc

I’ve begun to do the Corbet dailies. I’ve scored 100% in all up to higher where the problems begun. So I’m definitely in the higher section. As Algebra, geometry and ratio are the high markers I will be giving those more time then the others. So if you have a short amount of time make sure those two are down pat they are where the high scores will be in the exam.

I’ve also found the OCR papers and mark schemes so will use those. I was advised not to use Edxcel as their papers and marking schemes can be confusing.

I’ve noted everything in my diary, also the booking dates for the exam centre. Oh and it looks like the cost to sit in the summer is a LOT cheaper then in November. It’s worth checking. I may do a fast track class from January if I need it.

So it’s still going to be a slog, but as a mature adult it’s worth noting some subjects need a full two years to really learn it. Most adult courses are only a year or less - starting in Sept with the exam in the summer. Looking back at my class I’m not surprised I only got a 4, I wasn’t taught 50% of the curriculum plus I was taking an A level at the same time. Just give yourself time to do the qualification.

Onwards and upwards.

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