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    Any prospective History graduates here? Have you prepared any material at all on Histiography? I was told that you could be asked about it at interview.

    Anyone recommend some books on the topic? I've read 'What is History' by EH Carr, and will begin making notes on it soon. What has everyone else done?

    Also, the following definitions may be useful for provoking a point of discussion:

    History is the lie commonly agreed upon. (Voltaire)

    Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past. (George Orwell)

    History is more or less bunk. (Henry Ford)

    History: An account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools. (Ambrose Bierce)

    History could be divided into events which do not matter and events which probably never occurred. (W.R. Inge)

    History is only a confused heap of facts. (G.K. Chesterton)

    History is Philosophy teaching by examples. (Thucydides)

    Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to continue always a child. (Cicero)

    The first lesson of history is the good of evil. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

    History does not repeat itself except in the minds of those who do not know history. (Kahlil Gibran)

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. (Santayana)

    History is the intellectual form in which a civilization renders account to itself of its past. (Johann Huizinga)

    A nation which does not know what it was yesterday, does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. (Woodrow Wilson)

    To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. It is a very serious task, ... and possibly a tragic one. (Hermann Hesse)

    History is a people's memory, and without memory man is demoted to the lower animals. (Malcolm X)

    Peoples and governments have never learned anything from history, or acted on principles deducible from it. (G.W.F. Hegel)

    History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives. (Abba Eban)

    Our ignorance of history makes us libel our own times. People have always been like this. (Gustave Flaubert)

    Universal history, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the history of the Great Men who have worked here. (Thomas Carlyle)

    If a man could say nothing against a character but what he can prove, history could not be written. (Samuel Johnson)

    History is indeed the witness of the times, the light of truth. (Cicero)

    History is the "know thyself" of humanity -- the self-consciousness of mankind. (Droysen)

    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. (Karl Marx)

    History is a science, no less and no more. (J.B. Bury)

    History is past politics and politics present history. (E.A. Freeman)

    We teach history only when it can be made into an entertaining anecdote, a procedure which is about as sound as leaving the teaching of sexual hygiene to a commercial traveller. (Aubrey Maran)

    Fiction is history, human history, or it is nothing. (Joseph Conrad)

    History, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in. . . .The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all. (Jane Austen)

    The historian can learn much from the novelist. (Samuel Eliot Morison)

    History is an argument without end. (Peter Geyl)

    Anybody can make history; only a great man can write it. (Oscar Wilde)

    History is simply a piece of paper covered with print; the main thing is still to make history, not to write it. (Otto von Bismarck)

    No single man makes history. History cannot be seen just as one cannot see grass growing. (Boris Pasternak)

    Historical knowledge is not a variety of knowledge, but it is knowledge itself; it is the form which completely fills and exhausts the field of knowing. (Benedetto Croce)

    Genuine historical knowledge requires nobility of character, a profound understanding of human existence -- not detachment and objectivity. (Friedrich Nietzsche)

    It has been said that although God cannot alter the past, historians can. It is perhaps because they can be useful to him in this respect that he tolerates their existence. (Samuel Butler)

    It is not the literal past, the "facts" of history, that shape us, but images of the past embodied in language. (Brian Friel)

    History and myth are two aspects of a kind of grand pattern in human destiny: history is the mass of observable or recorded fact, but myth is the abstract or essence of it. (Robertson Davies)

    All statements about the past can be considered as very crude ways of expressing possible, hypothetical judgments about future experiences. (Pardon Tillinghast)

    Historical knowledge is the knowledge of what mind has done in the past, and at the same time it is the redoing of this, the perpetuation of past acts in the present. (R.G. Collingwood)

    Nothing capable of being memorized is history. (R.G. Collingwood)

    History... is a tool we use each generation or each year to help get along in the world, discarding the old tool for a new one whenever necessary. (Paul K. Conkin)

    History is a damn dim candle over a damn dark abyss. (W.S. Holt)
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    Tek, move away from the keyboard - have you heard of Repetitive Strain Injury?
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    Woah, I'm so glad I'm not planning to do history at uni. hehehe...I can't even be bothered to read quotations about it.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Tek, move away from the keyboard - have you heard of Repetitive Strain Injury?
    Lol...just doing my bit to help prospective historians
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    reaches for dictionary

    History = (record and account of) past events and developments.

    Seems reasonable to me
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    cheers for those quotes tek, they were interesting
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    (Original post by theone)
    reaches for dictionary

    History = (record and account of) past events and developments.

    Seems reasonable to me
    But the fact that my father drove home from work today will not be considered 'history', will it? That's where we need to begin differentiating between different types of facts, and their relevance and impact on the world.
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    (Original post by edders)
    cheers for those quotes tek, they were interesting
    You're welcome
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    (Original post by Tek)
    But the fact that my father drove home from work today will not be considered 'history', will it? That's where we need to begin differentiating between different types of facts, and their relevance and impact on the world.
    But it is history, because in some way or form it has shaped the future world.
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    (Original post by theone)
    But it is history, because in some way or form it has shaped the future world.
    That is the role of the Historian, to collect all the facts available to him and to produce a version of events which he feels are most relevant. Historical facts are facts which have influenced or shaped the world and which have affected more than a few individuals, for example the shooting of Arch Duke Ferdinand was one of the chance causes of World War I, and should be recorded as a historical fact becase it affected so many people, but the chance shooting of a British 'tommy' during World War I had little impact except to a few of his relatives, and consequently it would not be recorded as a historical fact, but it is a fact nonetheless.
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    As far as historiography regards, I personally recommend "Man is the Measure" by Reuben Abel.

    some more quotes:

    "The charm of history and its enigmatic lesson consists in the fact that, from age to age, nothing changes and yet everything is completely different" -Aldous Huxley

    "The historian makes a distinction between what may be called the outside and inside of an event. The outside means everything belonging to it which can be described in the terms of bodies and their movements (e.g. Caesar's crossing of the Rubicon or his assassination in Rome). The inside means that which can only be described in terms of thought. When a scientist says, "why did that piece of litmus paper turn pink?", he is investigation the outside of an event. By contrast, when a historian asks "why did Brutus stab Caesar?", he means "what did Brutus think that made him decide to stab Caesar?" -he is investigating the inside of the event. The cause of the event means the thought in the mind of the person whose agency the event came about... All history is the history of thought" -R.G. Collingwood

    "Even God cannot change the past. That must be why he allows for the existence of historians" -Anon
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    "The past is intelligible to us only in the light of the of the present; and we can fully understand the present only in the light of the past. To enable man to understand the society of the past, and to increase his mastery over the society of the present, is the dual function of history."

    EH Carr
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    "History cannot be reduced to clichés and soundbites" - kildare . Well it's probably what I would say if asked the question at intervew . On a more serious note I'd recommend Tosh's "The Pursuit of History" and Collingwoods' "The Idea of History". I'm also about to begin reading "In Defence of History" by Richard Evans. I'd say this may be an especially good work for you personally as Evans is currently a History Fellow of Gonville and Caius.
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Any prospective History graduates here? Have you prepared any material at all on Histiography? I was told that you could be asked about it at interview.

    Anyone recommend some books on the topic? I've read 'What is History' by EH Carr, and will begin making notes on it soon. What has everyone else done?

    Also, the following definitions may be useful for provoking a point of discussion:

    History is the lie commonly agreed upon. (Voltaire)

    Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past. (George Orwell)

    History is more or less bunk. (Henry Ford)

    History: An account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools. (Ambrose Bierce)

    History could be divided into events which do not matter and events which probably never occurred. (W.R. Inge)

    History is only a confused heap of facts. (G.K. Chesterton)

    History is Philosophy teaching by examples. (Thucydides)

    Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to continue always a child. (Cicero)

    The first lesson of history is the good of evil. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

    History does not repeat itself except in the minds of those who do not know history. (Kahlil Gibran)

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. (Santayana)

    History is the intellectual form in which a civilization renders account to itself of its past. (Johann Huizinga)

    A nation which does not know what it was yesterday, does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. (Woodrow Wilson)

    To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. It is a very serious task, ... and possibly a tragic one. (Hermann Hesse)

    History is a people's memory, and without memory man is demoted to the lower animals. (Malcolm X)

    Peoples and governments have never learned anything from history, or acted on principles deducible from it. (G.W.F. Hegel)

    History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives. (Abba Eban)

    Our ignorance of history makes us libel our own times. People have always been like this. (Gustave Flaubert)

    Universal history, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the history of the Great Men who have worked here. (Thomas Carlyle)

    If a man could say nothing against a character but what he can prove, history could not be written. (Samuel Johnson)

    History is indeed the witness of the times, the light of truth. (Cicero)

    History is the "know thyself" of humanity -- the self-consciousness of mankind. (Droysen)

    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. (Karl Marx)

    History is a science, no less and no more. (J.B. Bury)

    History is past politics and politics present history. (E.A. Freeman)

    We teach history only when it can be made into an entertaining anecdote, a procedure which is about as sound as leaving the teaching of sexual hygiene to a commercial traveller. (Aubrey Maran)

    Fiction is history, human history, or it is nothing. (Joseph Conrad)

    History, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in. . . .The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all. (Jane Austen)

    The historian can learn much from the novelist. (Samuel Eliot Morison)

    History is an argument without end. (Peter Geyl)

    Anybody can make history; only a great man can write it. (Oscar Wilde)

    History is simply a piece of paper covered with print; the main thing is still to make history, not to write it. (Otto von Bismarck)

    No single man makes history. History cannot be seen just as one cannot see grass growing. (Boris Pasternak)

    Historical knowledge is not a variety of knowledge, but it is knowledge itself; it is the form which completely fills and exhausts the field of knowing. (Benedetto Croce)

    Genuine historical knowledge requires nobility of character, a profound understanding of human existence -- not detachment and objectivity. (Friedrich Nietzsche)

    It has been said that although God cannot alter the past, historians can. It is perhaps because they can be useful to him in this respect that he tolerates their existence. (Samuel Butler)

    It is not the literal past, the "facts" of history, that shape us, but images of the past embodied in language. (Brian Friel)

    History and myth are two aspects of a kind of grand pattern in human destiny: history is the mass of observable or recorded fact, but myth is the abstract or essence of it. (Robertson Davies)

    All statements about the past can be considered as very crude ways of expressing possible, hypothetical judgments about future experiences. (Pardon Tillinghast)

    Historical knowledge is the knowledge of what mind has done in the past, and at the same time it is the redoing of this, the perpetuation of past acts in the present. (R.G. Collingwood)

    Nothing capable of being memorized is history. (R.G. Collingwood)

    History... is a tool we use each generation or each year to help get along in the world, discarding the old tool for a new one whenever necessary. (Paul K. Conkin)

    History is a damn dim candle over a damn dark abyss. (W.S. Holt)
    Is "What Is History?" really as good as everyone says? I've had it recommended by many people, including a history student at Cambridge, and I will buy it soon.

    What other books are you reading, Tek? I'm thinking of buying "In Defence of History" as well.
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Is "What Is History?" really as good as everyone says? I've had it recommended by many people, including a history student at Cambridge, and I will buy it soon.

    What other books are you reading, Tek? I'm thinking of buying "In Defence of History" as well.
    “What is History?” is indeed very very good. It is a bit old hat now I suppose but still definitely worth a read.
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    (Original post by kildare)
    "History cannot be reduced to clichés and soundbites" - kildare . Well it's probably what I would say if asked the question at intervew . On a more serious note I'd recommend Tosh's "The Pursuit of History" and Collingwoods' "The Idea of History". I'm also about to begin reading "In Defence of History" by Richard Evans. I'd say this may be an especially good work for you personally as Evans is currently a History Fellow of Gonville and Caius.
    Could you tell me some more on the two books you've mentioned, please? I'm thinking of buying "In Defence of History", could you tell me if it's good? Thanks, kildare. Are applying to Oxbridge, by the way?
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Could you tell me some more on the two books you've mentioned, please? I'm thinking of buying "In Defence of History", could you tell me if it's good? Thanks, kildare. Are applying to Oxbridge, by the way?
    “In Pursuit of History” is a solid, modern look at History as an academic subject. It’s a very readable work, and gives a broad introduction to the most pertinent questions faced by any student of history. I think one of its greatest strengths is Tosh’s even handed, apolitical look at issues of history.

    Collingwood’s book is a great read for anyone (such as myself) who is interested in both history and philosophy and the interplay between the two subjects. While you may not agree with his stance that “all history is the history of ideas” I don’t think you would be able to read him without finding his arguments intellectually stimulating.

    I’ll post an opinion on “In Defence of History” once I get around to reading it:P
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    (Original post by kildare)
    "History cannot be reduced to clichés and soundbites" - kildare . Well it's probably what I would say if asked the question at intervew . On a more serious note I'd recommend Tosh's "The Pursuit of History" and Collingwoods' "The Idea of History". I'm also about to begin reading "In Defence of History" by Richard Evans. I'd say this may be an especially good work for you personally as Evans is currently a History Fellow of Gonville and Caius.
    Oh poop, he disagrees with Carr....
    Anyway, I'm going to order 'The Pursuit of History' and 'In Defence Of history'.

    What else has everyone done to prepare? Just made notes on each book?

    (Original post by Tek)
    Oh poop, he disagrees with Carr....
    Anyway, I'm going to order 'The Pursuit of History' and 'In Defence Of history'.

    What else has everyone done to prepare? Just made notes on each book?
    If it's Oxford you are applying to, from what I know, most of the interviews tend to be centred round the written work submitted. It's more important that you can answer questions on those. Carr et al form part of a historiography module once there.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    If it's Oxford you are applying to, from what I know, most of the interviews tend to be centred round the written work submitted. It's more important that you can answer questions on those. Carr et al form part of a historiography module once there.
    But they are interested in books you've read and you could talk about those books in your interview.
 
 
 
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