The Student Room Group

Would I have more disposable income if I worked from home?

I spend nearly £400 a month commuting into work. We do get good Christmas bonuses though but on a month-month basis almost half of my salary is gone on tax, student loan but also my commute! I was thinking I could do a WFH for less salary but have more income bevause I won’t be spending it on the train
Reply 1
Original post by Amydesigns1104
I spend nearly £400 a month commuting into work. We do get good Christmas bonuses though but on a month-month basis almost half of my salary is gone on tax, student loan but also my commute! I was thinking I could do a WFH for less salary but have more income bevause I won’t be spending it on the train

Are you talking about doing the same job for less, or switching jobs to one that offers WFH?

There are certainly benefits to WFH when it comes to (not)commuting - saving on expenses; not having to worry about rail strikes / traffic jams etc; not having to travel in bad weather. You have to weigh these against any potential extra costs e.g. using your own heating/lighting/ energy while at home - not so bad in summer but could be an issue in winter. Also maybe using your own equipment - computer etc - unless supplied by your employer.

Also remember no big cafeteria or restaurant/ office birthday treats / catch-ups by the drinks machine etc :smile:
Original post by davros
Are you talking about doing the same job for less, or switching jobs to one that offers WFH?

There are certainly benefits to WFH when it comes to (not)commuting - saving on expenses; not having to worry about rail strikes / traffic jams etc; not having to travel in bad weather. You have to weigh these against any potential extra costs e.g. using your own heating/lighting/ energy while at home - not so bad in summer but could be an issue in winter. Also maybe using your own equipment - computer etc - unless supplied by your employer.

Also remember no big cafeteria or restaurant/ office birthday treats / catch-ups by the drinks machine etc :smile:


I agree.
Look at all the costs associated with both and weigh it up.
Does you job give you that option?
Original post by davros
Are you talking about doing the same job for less, or switching jobs to one that offers WFH?

There are certainly benefits to WFH when it comes to (not)commuting - saving on expenses; not having to worry about rail strikes / traffic jams etc; not having to travel in bad weather. You have to weigh these against any potential extra costs e.g. using your own heating/lighting/ energy while at home - not so bad in summer but could be an issue in winter. Also maybe using your own equipment - computer etc - unless supplied by your employer.

Also remember no big cafeteria or restaurant/ office birthday treats / catch-ups by the drinks machine etc :smile:


You can claim a WFH allowance to help offset some of the energy costs etc. See:- https://www.thetimes.co.uk/money-mentor/article/working-from-home-tax-relief/
Original post by SomeonesDad
You can claim a WFH allowance to help offset some of the energy costs etc. See:- https://www.thetimes.co.uk/money-mentor/article/working-from-home-tax-relief/

Like your user name. So simple but good. I think the WFH allowance was only for covid? Isn't that right?
Original post by Kutie Karen
Like your user name. So simple but good. I think the WFH allowance was only for covid? Isn't that right?


Thanks. Not sure my offspring would approve of being namechecked so I kept it simple :smile:

There was a Covid WFH allowance, but according to the Institute of Chartered Accountants for England & Wales, there is still a modified version of it in place. https://www.icaew.com/insights/tax-news/2023/jan-2023/working-from-home-tax-relief-claims-may-still-be-possible-for-2022-23#:~:text=From%20the%20current%20tax%20year,on%20a%20paper%20P87%20form.

hth

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