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Javier Traver
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#1
Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?

The context is:

"Experiments set-up/setup"

which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.

Another doubt: Is "cost analysis" ok? What I want to mean with this is the analysis of the temporal
cost (of an algorithm, or a procedure).

Thank-you,

Javier
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Einde O'Callagh
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Javier Traver wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> The context is:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Experiments set-up/setup"[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"experimental set-up" (all my dictionaries hyphenate the noun)

But why not use a heading like "preparation of experiments"?

[q1]> Another doubt: Is "cost analysis" ok? What I want to mean with this is the analysis of the[/q1]
[q1]> temporal cost (of an algorithm, or a procedure).[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"Cost analysis" is correct

[q1]> Thank-you,[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Javier[/q1]
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Javier Traver
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Einde O'Callaghan escribió:

[q1]> Javier Traver wrote:[/q1]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > The context is:[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > "Experiments set-up/setup"[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> "experimental set-up" (all my dictionaries hyphenate the noun)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

Thanks for your reply. Why did you change "Experiments" by "Experimental"? Is the former incorrect?
I think they mean different things: the former (with experiments) we mean a set-up for the
experiments, while the latter (with experimental) it means a set-up which is novel, different, it is
still in an experimental stage. Am I wrong?

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> But why not use a heading like "preparation of experiments"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

Probably because 'set-up' is shorter, and many people use it,...

[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Another doubt: Is "cost analysis" ok? What I want to mean with this is the analysis of the[/q2]
[q2]> > temporal cost (of an algorithm, or a procedure).[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> "Cost analysis" is correct[/q1]

Ok, thanks.

Javier
0
Einde O'Callagh
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Javier Traver wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Einde O'Callaghan escribió:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Javier Traver wrote:[/q2]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > The context is:[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > "Experiments set-up/setup"[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q2]> > "experimental set-up" (all my dictionaries hyphenate the noun)[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Thanks for your reply. Why did you change "Experiments" by "Experimental"? Is the former[/q1]
[q1]> incorrect? I think they mean different things: the former (with experiments) we mean a set-up for[/q1]
[q1]> the experiments, while the latter (with experimental) it means a set-up which is novel, different,[/q1]
[q1]> it is still in an experimental stage. Am I wrong?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
For me as a native speaker "experiments set-up" sounds ungrammatical, you could try "experiment
set-up" (it's usual in compound nouns made up of two nouns to put the first in the singular form
even if it refers to more than one), but it still sounds clumsy to me. On teh other hand
"experimental set-up" can mean "set-up for experiments" as well as "set-up that is still at the
experimental stage".

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Kristina Lim
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"Einde O'Callaghan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Javier Traver wrote:[/q1]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > The context is:[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > "Experiments set-up/setup"[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> "experimental set-up" (all my dictionaries hyphenate the noun)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
MW10 lists the word as "setup" and doesn't mention a hypenated version. Perhaps this is an
American-British difference? -Kristina
0
Micahel Gavin
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#6
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Kristina Lim wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Einde O'Callaghan" <[email protected]> wrote in message[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]> > Javier Traver wrote:[/q2]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > Which is the right one, set-up or setup (or anything else)?[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > The context is:[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > "Experiments set-up/setup"[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > which is supposed to mean how experiments were prepared, etc.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q2]> > "experimental set-up" (all my dictionaries hyphenate the noun)[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> MW10 lists the word as "setup" and doesn't mention a hypenated version. Perhaps this is an[/q1]
[q1]> American-British difference?[/q1]

I don't necessarily think so. I've also seen it unhyphenated in British texts, although teh
dictionaries hyphenate it. I think they ma do so because it derives from a phrasal verb and the
nouns derived from a phrasal verb are usually hyphenated - at least at first. Some are, of course,
now usually written without a hyphen, e.g. turnover, takeover, breakdown etc., so perhaps
set-up/setup is going the same way.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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