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Daveo
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#1
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In my lecture today we were presented with the following situation:

Ms X and Ms Y are both deaf, they do not view deafness as a disability, just a different culture, they wish to have a baby and would like to choose semen from a deaf donor to highten their chances of having a deaf child.


Should this be allowed?

In my view this is on a different scale to the designer babies we often hear about, The choice to have a deaf baby is chosing a negative characteristic which would disable the child and leave them at a natural disadvantage i.e. They would be unable to hear danger so would be more likely to be involved in an accident. I view this as an extremely poor choice on the part of Ms X and Ms Y who seem afraid of the hearing world and wish to inflict their disability on what would otherwise probably be a normal baby.

Any comments?
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technik
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i can understand where they are coming from.

but i agree in the world as it is, its a disablement. therefore it should be disallowed.
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Golden Maverick
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I think their request for a deaf baby is solely for their benefit. I do not see what benefit the child would get from being deaf. Therefore you are disabling the child not to increase it's own welbeing but that of the parents and so it should not be allowed.
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Howard
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(Original post by Daveo)
In my lecture today we were presented with the following situation:

Ms X and Ms Y are both deaf, they do not view deafness as a disability, just a different culture, they wish to have a baby and would like to choose semen from a deaf donor to highten their chances of having a deaf child.


Should this be allowed?

In my view this is on a different scale to the designer babies we often hear about, The choice to have a deaf baby is chosing a negative characteristic which would disable the child and leave them at a natural disadvantage i.e. They would be unable to hear danger so would be more likely to be involved in an accident. I view this as an extremely poor choice on the part of Ms X and Ms Y who seem afraid of the hearing world and wish to inflict their disability on what would otherwise probably be a normal baby.

Any comments?
Deafness is a disability regardless of X and Y's opinion. IMO they shouldn't be allowed to intentionally breed disability. That's sick.
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frost105
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I read an article on a deaf couple who had a child and they were relieved that the child was deaf as then he wouldnt have to feel the burdens but onto them for compensating for his parents disability.
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Checking for Spies
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That's just completely selfi*****hey would obviously be putting themselves before the child;think how difficult it must be in life to be deaf.Surely they should realise this themselves!
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MC
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No, it shouldn't be allowed. Why do that to a child? Surely the child should be brought into this world with as many positive attributes as possible? If nature causes the child to be deaf by natural random conception, that is a different matter.
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spin
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People learn to communicate better when they are very young. The optimum age for learning a language is about 3 I believe. I should think this includes learning to communicate by other means aswell.

If they don't view deafness as a disability - great, I'm very happy for them. They can teach their (perfectly health and non-deaf) child to communicate with them through other means. A young mind should be able to pick up sign language for example. Why they think this child shouldn't also have the advantage of communicating with the wider world aswell I don't understand.. It will be more of a burden for the child through its life being unable to hear than having to help deaf parents..
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Trousers
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Ms X and Ms Y have obviously grown to love their disability, but what if the child doesn't? Not every deaf person enjoys it, or even copes well with it. They would be inflicting upon the child a lifestyle that he or she might find very difficult, so no, it is not ethical. They should think more about the child's needs.
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LongGone
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It's not the sort of decision you should be allowed to make for another person is it? Therefore, no it shouldn't be allowed.
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PQ
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(Original post by Frances)
It's not the sort of decision you should be allowed to make for another person is it? Therefore, no it shouldn't be allowed.
Although a lot of (hearing) parents of deaf* children decide that they SHOULD hear (before they're old enough to make the decision for themselves) and authorise cochlear implants before the child is 3 or 4.
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Jamie
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(Original post by Howard)
Deafness is a disability regardless of X and Y's opinion. IMO they shouldn't be allowed to intentionally breed disability. That's sick.
Indeed, its all well and good using other senses to compensate, but hows that going to help when you don't hear a car coming up behind you.
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technik
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(Original post by PQ)
Although a lot of (hearing) parents of deaf* children decide that they SHOULD hear (before they're old enough to make the decision for themselves) and authorise cochlear implants before the child is 3 or 4.
thats however positive adjustment, not negative.
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Daveo
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Well i'm glad the opinions is pretty unanimous(sp), stupid ethics lecturer. :rolleyes:
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Elles
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(Original post by PQ)
Although a lot of (hearing) parents of deaf* children decide that they SHOULD hear (before they're old enough to make the decision for themselves) and authorise cochlear implants before the child is 3 or 4.
we had a clinical demonstration with a surgeon who did these.. i agree with your ethical point. but apparently the 'success' rate declines rapidly with age.. so if they're going to work, it's important that they're carried out young. (can't remember exactly why, but can look it up..)

but he did highlight the 'deaf culture' movement etc.

(Original post by trousers)
Not every deaf person enjoys it, or even copes well with it.
we're talking about congenital deafness here - it's not a case of 'enjoying' people cope because they have to & it's all they've known. the poor coping mechanisms may be a different matter in acute trauma induced deafness.

anyway, for the record, i'm torn, so i don't think you can count me as one of your unanimous (sp..i can't remember either, lol) types Daveo. :p:
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viviki
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Its more complicated than you think though. Both my great grandparents were deaf and dumb and lived within the deaf community they didn't really associate with hearing people at all. My grandad was born not deaf and dumb and was really psychologically damaged because he never learnt to communicate with people. He would communicate with my great grandparents through sign but never really fitted into the main stream community. He ended up being a loner had very few friends couldn't show emotion with family etc etc and I'm sure that things would have been very different for him had he also been deaf. I think his parents found it very hard to bring him up and he felt like he had to look after them constantly.
I could understand why a deaf couple would prefer a deaf child. What you look upon as a disability is almost a culture to them. Its not a clear cut issue IMO anyway.
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frost105
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Its almost like asking your child to be born without a tongue as your mute and you would feel comfortable with a child with the same disability. Or not having any legs etc.
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Howard
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(Original post by frost105)
Its almost like asking your child to be born without a tongue as your mute and you would feel comfortable with a child with the same disability. Or not having any legs etc.
Or a tiny ****.
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frost105
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#19
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(Original post by Howard)
Or a tiny ****.
Exactly-how will your child function in life?
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Howard
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(Original post by frost105)
Exactly-how will your child function in life?
I left myself wide open to that one didn't I? :rolleyes:
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