IRA withdraws weapons commitment

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technik
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#81
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#81
(Original post by yawn)
I was under the impression that the DUP/UUP had the PUP as their representatives on the 'unlawful' fringes. I remember one David Ervine sitting in the Assembly along with everyone else. That was the whole idea, wasn't it? Inclusion.

There you go again, making disparaging remarks against a whole swathe of your fellow countrymen, simply because they are nationalists. It does not add to being able to take your opinions seriously. You just indicate that you are a bigot!
And shouldn't you be revising for your GCSE's?
revision...? dont be silly.

frankly i dont care if you dont take my comments seriously. enough do to make me uninterested in what trash spews from your fingers.
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SamTheMan
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#82
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#82
(Original post by yawn)
I don't think your idea would be acceptable to the people in the Republic!

Why should they be subject to a central London body? Who would you see heading this central London body? The Irish or the British?

Ireland has their own autonomy and successful economy and it is foolish to suggest that they give up these things to become one with England.
There are no terrorists - there are only 'freedom fighters'
It's quite sad that people actually support "freedom fighters". Ireland used to reproach the British government for its lack of humanity and respect of human rights (although, at the time, no other country was doing more for civil rights), yet, there are Irish people who find it perfectly fine to kill innocent civilians to reach their goal.

technik wasn't talking about becoming one with England: he said 4 nations under one government so it wouldn't be about becoming one, just as Scotland isn't England. I think few Brits would be opposed to having Irish from the former Republic at the head of government. A lot of British history is Irish. A lot of great writers of British literature are Irish and there's a certain resentment from a lot of Brits about no longer being united with Ireland. Most Brits are more pro-Ireland than pro-yanks or pro-european when there's some form of international competition.

The Brits have come along way since Irish independence. The trouble with Irish nationalists is that they reassure themselves about their convictions by symbolising Britain with Cromwell. The Britain they hate so much no longer exists and hasn't existed for a very long time.
Since those days, few countries have done as much for human rights as Britain has (slavery, workers' rights, women's right to vote, abortion, Amnesty International...).
In my opinion, Unionists/Loyalists in Northern Ireland live less in the past and have got over their frustration, more than Republicans have. Republicans still resent being associated with a country that doesn't exist any longer anyway. Unionists accept their Irish identity yet they accept the fact that they are associated with Britain and are proud of it. Why would they want to separate from the UK anyway? For stuff that happened centuries ago? To me that sounds more angst-ridden.

I can't imagine a scenario where a United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland would reappear.
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technik
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#83
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#83
(Original post by SamTheMan)
It's quite sad that people actually support "freedom fighters". Ireland used to reproach the British government for its lack of humanity and respect of human rights (although, at the time, no other country was doing more for civil rights), yet, there are Irish people who find it perfectly fine to kill innocent civilians to reach their goal.

technik wasn't talking about becoming one with England: he said 4 nations under one government so it wouldn't be about becoming one, just as Scotland isn't England. I think few Brits would be opposed to having Irish from the former Republic at the head of government. A lot of British history is Irish. A lot of great writers of British literature are Irish and there's a certain resentment from a lot of Brits about no longer being united with Ireland. Most Brits are more pro-Ireland than pro-yanks or pro-european when there's some form of international competition.

The Brits have come along way since Irish independence. The trouble with Irish nationalists is that they reassure themselves about their convictions by symbolising Britain with Cromwell. The Britain they hate so much no longer exists and hasn't existed for a very long time.
Since those days, few countries have done as much for human rights as Britain has (slavery, workers' rights, women's right to vote, abortion, Amnesty International...).
In my opinion, Unionists/Loyalists in Northern Ireland live less in the past and have got over their frustration, more than Republicans have. Republicans still resent being associated with a country that doesn't exist any longer anyway. Unionists accept their Irish identity yet they accept the fact that they are associated with Britain and are proud of it. Why would they want to separate from the UK anyway? For stuff that happened centuries ago? To me that sounds more angst-ridden.

I can't imagine a scenario where a United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland would reappear.
pretty spot on. for the majority of unionists, they couldnt give a rats ass whether its northern ireland or just ireland. as long as it says British Citizen on the passport i'd be happy. its a pride that others in the rest of the UK would be wise to try and replicate.
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d750
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#84
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#84
(Original post by technik)
and a united ireland wont be acceptable to many in NI and the rest of the UK.
No one seems to acknowledge that a united Ireland wouldn't be acceptible to the majority in the 26 as well. If you held a referendum tomorrow, you certainly wouldn't get a vote for unification. It's just not in Ireland's economic interest, and people won't vote for tax rises.
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technik
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#85
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#85
(Original post by d750)
No one seems to acknowledge that a united Ireland wouldn't be acceptible to the majority in the 26 as well. If you held a referendum tomorrow, you certainly wouldn't get a vote for unification. It's just not in Ireland's economic interest, and people won't vote for tax rises.
ive stated exactly that in the past before. so i've very much acknowledged it. a few die-hards disagreed though.
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NDGAARONDI
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#86
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#86
(Original post by SamTheMan)
The trouble with Irish nationalists is that they reassure themselves about their convictions by symbolising Britain with Cromwell.
Not William III?
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