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Debate: How do we fix Britain's housing crisis?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKOFAkyuc-E

"Everyone wants a decent place to live, and one that doesn't eat up all their income, but a home you can afford seems increasingly hard to find. (Subscribe: https://bit.ly/C4_News_Subscribe)

Mortgage payments are rising for millions as people come off fixed deals, rents are going up too, properties for rent snapped up within minutes, and social housing lists that can be as long as a decade.

We discuss what it feels like at the sharp end, what's going wrong, and what can be done to put it right.

We also hear from those struggling to keep a roof over their head, to the builders and sellers, the renters and the planners as we debate Britain's housing crisis."
It is everyone's struggle, especially for those who aren't living with their parents.
Reply 2
Original post by ABBAForever2015
It is everyone's struggle, especially for those who aren't living with their parents.


Is it?

I don't live with my parents, mortgage got fully offset last week. How is it my struggle?
Reply 3
Original post by ABBAForever2015
It is everyone's struggle, especially for those who aren't living with their parents.


Indeed, how is it my parents struggle? They bought their house with cash when they retired.
Original post by Quady
Is it?

I don't live with my parents, mortgage got fully offset last week. How is it my struggle?


Who is referring to you? Who cares if you are rich enough to buy houses? What's your motive to come in and respond aggressively?
Reply 5
Original post by ABBAForever2015
Who is referring to you? Who cares if you are rich enough to buy houses? What's your motive to come in and respond aggressively?


You...?

You realise what the word 'everyone' means.

So either you were using hyperbole, which is passive agressive, or you're being inaccurate.
Build more council houses, ban corporate home ownership and place caps on the number of homes owned by a single person.
We need to build more homes, that is clear, but we also need to be realistic about where people live. Currently, demand for housing varies significantly across the country, with some locations having a real crisis and others with actually quite affordable housing. We can't house nearly everyone in a select few parts of the country, though, so ultimately we are unlikely to arrive at a point when almost anyone can afford something anywhere in the country.
Original post by Quady
You...?

You realise what the word 'everyone' means.

So either you were using hyperbole, which is passive agressive, or you're being inaccurate.


Shouldn't you ask yourself rather than me instead?
Reply 9
Original post by ABBAForever2015
Shouldn't you ask yourself rather than me instead?


What have I said what you concider:
A) Hyperbole; and/or
B) Inaccurate?
Reply 10
To be honest id really like to see a law passed putting a cap on the number of investment properties people can own. Someone buying a couple to retire off the income is one thing, some **** buying a hundred or so to bilk the public id obscene.
Other than that, remove greenbelt restrictions, disband any council that doesn't reform their planning laws to allow people to build what they want and so on.
Threatening to nationalize any bank that partakes in price gouging would be nice as well. Charging 9% on a mortgage is absolutely obscene. Here, ASB is charging 8.5%. Imagine paying that on a $1mn mortgage (not a very big one either). i dont know what the mortgage regs are back in the UK these days but one here is that you need a 20% deposit and a thorough examination of your finances to show you can afford double the mortgage repayments, on a small mortgage of half a million that makes a deposit of 100k and rough repayments of about 6k a month.. more than most people earn. Yes 2008 was unfortunate but various governments responses to that has simply priced any normal person out of it for some rubbish excuse about 'fiscal responsibility'.

Then again, much of this can directly be attrivuted to governments *****y policies. Be it jacking interest rates after they caused inflation, selling off housing and not building any more, introducing (and removing) too many regulations etc. etc. etc.
Original post by Quady
What have I said what you concider:
A) Hyperbole; and/or
B) Inaccurate?


C) Whether the person asking is asking in bad faith
Primarily it's a supply issue, so build more homes and densify our urban areas (4 or 5 storey townhouse flats rather than 2 or 3 storey individual houses).

Some areas are also seeing an issue with lots of the local housing stock being bought up for holiday homes, where there will need to be building to reflect that these areas are more in demand now, but a solely supply-side response would just price more people into being able to afford a second home there rather than creating homes for people who want to live in the community full time. There's a case for requiring owners to apply for change-of-use permission to convert a permanent home into a holiday home (whether for them or to rent out short-term) โ€“ and place an obligation on homeowners to let out any property that they aren't using as their main home unless they've had permission to use it as a holiday home. Local communities could cap the number of second homes at 10-20% if they so chose.
You might also reform the planning system so that planning authorities could set reasonable requirements for what sort of development was allowed (in terms of design, and also quanitity subject to quotas) โ€“ and if a planning application fit those requirements then it would have to be accepted, and couldn't be sunk by random objections.
(edited 3 months ago)
Reply 14
Original post by Saracen's Fez
You might also reform the planning system so that planning authorities could set reasonable requirements for what sort of development was allowed (in terms of design, and also quanitity subject to quotas) โ€“ and if a planning application fit those requirements then it would have to be accepted, and couldn't be sunk by random objections.


Yes, because 'reasonable' is easily definable into legislation.
Original post by Quady
Yes, because 'reasonable' is easily definable into legislation.


The actual legislation might have a bit more detail than that :rolleyes:

And what isn't covered there is easily justiciable...
Reply 16
Original post by Quady
Yes, because 'reasonable' is easily definable into legislation.


Reasonable is used in all sorts of legislation - the way it's defined depends on the context but the legislation itself can give a steer, or refer to guidance documents published by the relevant sec of state or gov body etc...

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