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Personal Statement Help

I want to do law at university and have been looking for law and non-law books to reference and read. What non-law books do you guys recommend? Everyone is reading 'To Kill a Mockingbird' but I don't want to put that in my personal statement since everyone will do.
Why do you think you need non-law books in your personal statement?
Reply 2
Original post by PQ
Why do you think you need non-law books in your personal statement?


I don't know to be honest. It's just that everyone around me is reading a non-law book in their law personal statements.
Original post by bayan2005
I don't know to be honest. It's just that everyone around me is reading a non-law book in their law personal statements.


This about the academic staff setting the criteria for a "good" Law PS. They will have normally taken a Law undergraduate course (LLB), taken some form of Law related postgraduate course (either a professional qualification or a masters or both) and then either studied a PhD in law or worked in law for a number of years before deciding that they want to spend their professional career teaching law to undergraduate students.

Do you think that someone with that background is going to be bothered about your leisure reading? In your PS they'll be interested in your academic interests and activities relating to law - not other reading or hobbies.
Reply 4
I get where you're coming from - academic interests and law-related activities are the main things they want to see in our personal statements. But don't dismiss the power of other books too. They can show that we're well-rounded and have the ability to see things from different angles, which is pretty important in law.

Take '1984' by George Orwell, for example. It's not a law book, but it makes you think about things like privacy, government control, and civil rights - all super relevant to law. Or look at 'The New Jim Crow' by Michelle Alexander. It's not about law as such, but it dives deep into how laws can really impact marginalised communities.

Even something like 'Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?' by Michael Sandel is useful. It's all about what justice means, which is a pretty big deal when you're studying law hehe

And you're right about 'To Kill a Mockingbird'. It's like the go-to book for every law school applicant, but there's a ton of other books out there that can give us fresh insights into legal themes.

So yeah, the admission team definitely wants to see our law-related interests, but showing them that we have a broad range of knowledge and understanding isn't going to hurt. Good luck!
Original post by Eviee6
I get where you're coming from - academic interests and law-related activities are the main things they want to see in our personal statements. But don't dismiss the power of other books too. They can show that we're well-rounded and have the ability to see things from different angles, which is pretty important in law.

Take '1984' by George Orwell, for example. It's not a law book, but it makes you think about things like privacy, government control, and civil rights - all super relevant to law. Or look at 'The New Jim Crow' by Michelle Alexander. It's not about law as such, but it dives deep into how laws can really impact marginalised communities.

Even something like 'Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?' by Michael Sandel is useful. It's all about what justice means, which is a pretty big deal when you're studying law hehe

And you're right about 'To Kill a Mockingbird'. It's like the go-to book for every law school applicant, but there's a ton of other books out there that can give us fresh insights into legal themes.

So yeah, the admission team definitely wants to see our law-related interests, but showing them that we have a broad range of knowledge and understanding isn't going to hurt. Good luck!


Admissions and academic staff are more interested in seeing applicants talking about the crossover between legal issues and current affairs than fiction. Something like the topics picked up in Law in Action https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/brand/b006tgy1 would be more use than Orwell
Reply 6
you guys were so helpful. Thank you so much. :smile:
Reply 7
Some good George Orwell books- such as animal farm or 1984 as they indirectly reference law&justice and political ideologies-capitalism and socialism
Crime and Punishment by Dostoyevsky?
Original post by bayan2005
I want to do law at university and have been looking for law and non-law books to reference and read. What non-law books do you guys recommend? Everyone is reading 'To Kill a Mockingbird' but I don't want to put that in my personal statement since everyone will do.

It is important to reflect on your experience…
In terms of fiction involving law: One Piece’s world government, a corrupt body using law in their own self interest
The Secret Barrister :smile:

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