The Student Room Group

Am I setting myself up for no jobs by doing a geology degree?

I'm currently torn between a geology offer at Liverpool and a pharmacology offer at Glasgow. My parents tell me to reject my geology offer to go to Glasgow. I want to apply for geology but they are afraid that once I finish the degree there won't be instant jobs as soon as I graduate like there usually are for health related careers. This is because my dad studied geology but hasn't ended up working in a sector specific to it, so my mum is worried that the same will happen to me and I won't end up with the job I wanted wjth a salary that can support me. I don't intend to stay in the UK after studying but plan to move somewhere where Geology orientated jobs are in demand, i.e. Australia. So my main question is, is there not really demand for geologists (UK location and otherwise)?
Reply 1
What makes you/ your parents think pharmacology is a particularly employable/ career focussed degree? Is there some confusion with pharmacy here?
Reply 2
My parents believe that there will be more lucrative careers once I finish pharmacology,as in I can make a career in pharmacology but also pharmacy or that j could specialise into fields like microbiology and pathology. They believe that once graduating from almost any health related science degree, jobs would be at easier to find than having done a geology degree.
(edited 11 months ago)
Employment rates for life science degrees are much lower than for geology degrees.
Reply 4
Employment rates for life science degrees are much lower than for geology degrees.


Is there a website or recent statistic that I can look at for this employment rate?
Thank you
Is there a website or recent statistic that I can look at for this employment rate?
Thank you


Pharmacology is a bit better than most life sciences but there’s still a HUGE proportion (40%) going on to further study to retrain to get a job after graduating

https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007794/F604A-2208/Full-time/ - Glasgow geology. 60% in professional work after graduating and hardly any unemployed. 25% in further study which is more typical for people wanting to stay in academia.

Pharma link: https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007794/B210-2105/Full-time/

For both I would ignore the stats on salaries - the methodology is seriously flawed and excludes people working in self employment or outside the UK - which as you say is going to miss a lot of geology grads.

Look at the types of jobs people go into
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 6
Pharmacology is a bit better than most life sciences but there’s still a HUGE proportion (40%) going on to further study to retrain to get a job after graduating

https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007794/F604A-2208/Full-time/ - Glasgow geology. 60% in professional work after graduating and hardly any unemployed. 25% in further study which is more typical for people wanting to stay in academia.

Pharma link: https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007794/B210-2105/Full-time/

For both I would ignore the stats on salaries - the methodology is seriously flawed and excludes people working in self employment or outside the UK - which as you say is going to miss a lot of geology grads.

Look at the types of jobs people go into


Thank you very much
Reply 7
My parents believe that there will be more lucrative careers once I finish pharmacology,as in I can make a career in pharmacology but also pharmacy or that j could specialise into fields like microbiology and pathology. They believe that once graduating from almost any health related science degree, jobs would be at easier to find than having done a geology degree.

I think that @pq has confirmed my belief.
The general advice is to study a subject you enjoy, and not worry to much about potential jobs. Taking a degree in any subject will provide you with life skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, time management, interpretative analysis and for STEM subjects some numeracy skills. For example, not many people who study history go on to become professional historians, but they are employable because they can process complex levels of information and make sense of it. The future for specific careers in geosciences is still good in certain areas. The race is on to find new sources of materials (lithium, cobalt, nickel, copper etc) to power the electrification of vehicles. If governments do get their act together and opt for carbon sequestration and storage, geologist will be needed to find the best underground locations to store the captured carbon. Geoscience jobs can also appear in unexpected places. Last year I spotted a well known global perfume and fashion company advertizing for a geoscientist to help them become more environmentally sustainable.

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