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St Salvators Quad, University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews

Applying for St Andrews IR on UCAS

Hello, I am currently looking at IR courses to apply to study next year, and while St Andrews looks like a great uni to study at and has an amazing IR course, I am slightly confused about how things work with the course structure and how I apply.

Ideally I would like to study a language alongside IR (I know that Scottish universities let you study multiple subjects, for the first year at least), but what confuses me is how I do it. Do I apply for straight IR on UCAS and then (if accepted) choose to study a language alongside it, or do I select the IR and [language] option on the UCAS form?

Anything to at least clear this up would be greatly appreciated, thank you!
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by okkotapus
Hello, I am currently looking at IR courses to apply to study next year, and while St Andrews looks like a great uni to study at and has an amazing IR course, I am slightly confused about how things work with the course structure and how I apply.

Ideally I would like to study a language alongside IR (I know that Scottish universities let you study multiple subjects, for the first year at least), but what confuses me is how I do it. Do I apply for straight IR on UCAS and then (if accepted) choose to study a language alongside it, or do I select the IR and [language] option on the UCAS form?

Anything to at least clear this up would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

In terms of learning a language, are you referring to this? https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiFtumd4YSBAxWFiFwKHd7aDncQFnoECA8QAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.st-andrews.ac.uk%2Fsubjects%2Fnon-degree-courses%2Fevening-language-courses%2F&usg=AOvVaw22Oqh546pt1FeMR52ygxOJ&opi=89978449
It doesn't matter what year student you are, you can always have access to learn a language at st andrews.

To quote from the website
’The University of St Andrews offers evening language courses throughout the academic year. Courses are offered to students at all levels of study, from beginners to advanced learners.
The evening language courses last for ten weeks, and as a student, you will attend one class per week. All classes last for 2 hours.
Students should note that the modules offered in the evening language courses are not part of any degree pathway and may not be used as credit counting towards a degree programme.’

‘How to book a place
Follow these steps to book a place in one of our evening language courses:
Look at the course descriptions and the level of study guidance below to estimate your level in the language you are interested in. This is especially important if you are not a beginner and have not taken an evening language course at the University of St Andrews before. If you are unsure what your level is, you can email [email protected] to discuss this with a tutor.
Check the timetable to make sure your course is available. The majority of our evening language courses are in-person but some are online, and online courses are marked on the timetable.
Have your University username and student ID number ready, you will need them to make a booking.
St Salvators Quad, University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
Reply 2
Original post by BankaiGintoki
In terms of learning a language, are you referring to this? https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiFtumd4YSBAxWFiFwKHd7aDncQFnoECA8QAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.st-andrews.ac.uk%2Fsubjects%2Fnon-degree-courses%2Fevening-language-courses%2F&usg=AOvVaw22Oqh546pt1FeMR52ygxOJ&opi=89978449
It doesn't matter what year student you are, you can always have access to learn a language at st andrews.

To quote from the website
’The University of St Andrews offers evening language courses throughout the academic year. Courses are offered to students at all levels of study, from beginners to advanced learners.
The evening language courses last for ten weeks, and as a student, you will attend one class per week. All classes last for 2 hours.
Students should note that the modules offered in the evening language courses are not part of any degree pathway and may not be used as credit counting towards a degree programme.’

‘How to book a place
Follow these steps to book a place in one of our evening language courses:
Look at the course descriptions and the level of study guidance below to estimate your level in the language you are interested in. This is especially important if you are not a beginner and have not taken an evening language course at the University of St Andrews before. If you are unsure what your level is, you can email [email protected] to discuss this with a tutor.
Check the timetable to make sure your course is available. The majority of our evening language courses are in-person but some are online, and online courses are marked on the timetable.
Have your University username and student ID number ready, you will need them to make a booking.


Sorry if I wasn't clear, I was referring
Reply 3
Original post by BankaiGintoki
In terms of learning a language, are you referring to this? https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiFtumd4YSBAxWFiFwKHd7aDncQFnoECA8QAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.st-andrews.ac.uk%2Fsubjects%2Fnon-degree-courses%2Fevening-language-courses%2F&usg=AOvVaw22Oqh546pt1FeMR52ygxOJ&opi=89978449
It doesn't matter what year student you are, you can always have access to learn a language at st andrews.

To quote from the website
’The University of St Andrews offers evening language courses throughout the academic year. Courses are offered to students at all levels of study, from beginners to advanced learners.
The evening language courses last for ten weeks, and as a student, you will attend one class per week. All classes last for 2 hours.
Students should note that the modules offered in the evening language courses are not part of any degree pathway and may not be used as credit counting towards a degree programme.’

‘How to book a place
Follow these steps to book a place in one of our evening language courses:
Look at the course descriptions and the level of study guidance below to estimate your level in the language you are interested in. This is especially important if you are not a beginner and have not taken an evening language course at the University of St Andrews before. If you are unsure what your level is, you can email [email protected] to discuss this with a tutor.
Check the timetable to make sure your course is available. The majority of our evening language courses are in-person but some are online, and online courses are marked on the timetable.
Have your University username and student ID number ready, you will need them to make a booking.


Sorry if I wasn't clear, I was referring to taking IR along with a language (maybe Russian) and one other subject in my first year (as far as I can tell Scottish unis let you take three subjects and then reduce them down to one or two), with a view to finishing my course with a joint degree in IR and Russian. What I am confused about is whether in my UCAS form for the options section I simply put down IR and then later choose Russian as one of my other subjects, or if I should select IR and Russian as the option I am applying for. Those evening classes do look interesting though, so thank you very much for bringing them to my attention!
Reply 4
Original post by okkotapus
Hello, I am currently looking at IR courses to apply to study next year, and while St Andrews looks like a great uni to study at and has an amazing IR course, I am slightly confused about how things work with the course structure and how I apply.

Ideally I would like to study a language alongside IR (I know that Scottish universities let you study multiple subjects, for the first year at least), but what confuses me is how I do it. Do I apply for straight IR on UCAS and then (if accepted) choose to study a language alongside it, or do I select the IR and [language] option on the UCAS form?

Anything to at least clear this up would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

If you want to study a language alongside IR at St Andrews as part of your degree then you can either apply just for IR and then select language modules once there. Or you can apply for a joint degree. In both cases you'll need to meet the entry requirements/module prerequisites for the language which you can see on the website. The advantage of applying for a joint degree is you are guaranteed the modules. I know IR is very popular. I don't know about the language courses. If you apply for a joint degree then both departments review your application. They say that doesn't affect your chances of an offer though. What might be more relevant is what you are applying for elsewhere and what your personal statement looks like. You would need a strong statement that covered both IR and the language. Will you be applying for similar combinations elsewhere? If not then I'd stick to single honours and pick a language as one of your additional subjects if you get in.
Reply 5
Original post by S1098
If you want to study a language alongside IR at St Andrews as part of your degree then you can either apply just for IR and then select language modules once there. Or you can apply for a joint degree. In both cases you'll need to meet the entry requirements/module prerequisites for the language which you can see on the website. The advantage of applying for a joint degree is you are guaranteed the modules. I know IR is very popular. I don't know about the language courses. If you apply for a joint degree then both departments review your application. They say that doesn't affect your chances of an offer though. What might be more relevant is what you are applying for elsewhere and what your personal statement looks like. You would need a strong statement that covered both IR and the language. Will you be applying for similar combinations elsewhere? If not then I'd stick to single honours and pick a language as one of your additional subjects if you get in.

Thanks for the reply! At the moment the plan is to also apply to International Politics and Modern Languages at Bath as well as IR at LSE (as far as I know they let you take some language modules). I'm still looking for a couple other IR courses but they'd probably also include languages ideally.

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