The Student Room Group

Do you manage to keep up with hobbies at uni?

So I'm starting uni (a very intense science course) soon, and I wonder if you can keep up doing all your hobbies and try new ones? I play an instrument (at grade 7-8 level now) and I'm slightly worried I won't have time to play and after a few years my skills would be all lost...

I'm planning to join an orchestra/band and I'd like to ask if you would need to audition for it, generally?
Reply 1
Have a look at the Facebook or webpages for the orchestra(s), they will usually indicate if an audition is required, or you can get in touch.

As for practising an instrument in halls, in my experience, that's never been massively easy unless you're a music student, as practice rooms are few and far between and constantly booked up, and you're not often allowed to practise in your room. If you have private accommodation, it's a bit easier.
Hi @Bookworm524 , Congratulations on getting into university and joining the world of STEM.
I am an engineering student and I understand why you are worried because STEM courses tend to be very demanding in and out of class. With a little discipline and good time management you can definitely keep up academically and still have a hobby. It's a little easier in first year as your schedule is busy but manageable. I am a student ambassador , an avid member of the electronics club , I go to gym and manage to make time to go to church and keep up with my academics. It's not easy but as long as I manage my time well , I still do all the things I love. The only thing that has changed is that I no longer have the time to read as much as I would like and I don't build puzzles that often anymore. I had to prioritize what was most important to me.

Don't worry about it too much , you will learn to manage your time . I hope this helps 😁
Cece
Energy Engineering Student
De Montfort University
@Bookworm524

I think you might just have to be realistic about what you can and can't do.

So if maintaining your music skills is your priority then maybe aside from orchestra, you could look into joining one other society but realistically you might not be able to join two or three societies and do orchestra.

Go to taster sessions for some of the societies that you are interested in to see what you think and if you would like to attend. Also think about the time commitment needed for the different societies. Some societies might not require you to go every week ,whereas others might need more time during the week e.g. sports practice on one day and then match day on another day.

Once you have your timetable it will be easier to see what you can and can't do, so work around your timetable remembering that you need time not just to attend lectures but to get work done i.e. additional reading and revision notes.

All the best,

Oluwatosin 2nd year student University of Huddersfield
Reply 4
My first degree was Engineering and Design and we basically had full contact hours everyday, with lectures, labs etc - add some time each evening for reading / assignments and its more than a full time job and you do need to be organised - but only 8(ish) months of the year (alas we were always the last exams to finish)

One of my mates on the course played Saxophone, he had no problem fitting plenty of solo practice, group practice and band trips on the weekends. His flat mates tolerated some practice at home (he was v good so it wasn't too painful. Bit loud though) but mostly he practiced in Uni audition rooms
Original post by Bookworm524
So I'm starting uni (a very intense science course) soon, and I wonder if you can keep up doing all your hobbies and try new ones? I play an instrument (at grade 7-8 level now) and I'm slightly worried I won't have time to play and after a few years my skills would be all lost...

I'm planning to join an orchestra/band and I'd like to ask if you would need to audition for it, generally?

Hi @Bookworm524

Congratulations on securing a place at University! How are you feeling about starting University? :smile: It is nice to hear that you play an instrument and would like to keep it up.

I will be a third year law student this September, and so far I have had no issues with keeping up with my hobbies whilst spending most times on my studies. Though I do understand that a science course can be quite demanding.

Depending on your University, there may be music rooms that you can use for practice. Whilst you may not be able to practice as often, if you learn to manage your time properly, I think you can definitely continue with your hobby. At University, keeping a good work life balance is important.

Perhaps you can look into any bands or Orchestras in your University and see what their entry requirements are. I hope this helps.

All the best with University!
Chloe
-University of Kent Student Rep
Reply 6
thanks everyone for your advice!
Reply 7
Hi,

I play guitar and struggled to balance my joy of playing guitar as well as the course, part-time work, etc. For me something that really helped was time-slotting and learning how to say no when you've booked in a lot for yourself to practise at a certain time.

We can be quite reactionary and feel like our time isn't our own, so taking the time to plan out the amount of hours you have against what you want to accomplish in a day is something I found massively important. Hipe this helps.
Original post by Bookworm524
So I'm starting uni (a very intense science course) soon, and I wonder if you can keep up doing all your hobbies and try new ones? I play an instrument (at grade 7-8 level now) and I'm slightly worried I won't have time to play and after a few years my skills would be all lost...

I'm planning to join an orchestra/band and I'd like to ask if you would need to audition for it, generally?

Hi! Congratulations on getting into uni!

Time management is a crucial skill to learn at university and the fact that you're already thinking about this is a good sign! If playing an instrument is something that you want to continue you can definitely make time to practice, you just have to keep organised. Personally, I find keeping track of my homework, assignments and extra curricular activities in a paper planner is helpful as physically writing my tasks helps me remember them, but you can find whatever works for you wether that's online, paper or another form.

Hope this helps! Faye :smile:
Absolutely. I had more free time than I expected in uni. Throughout my BSc + MSc I held down three volunteer roles (one here on TSR), wrote several books, ran a writers group with regular meets, kept up with reading and gaming, went to gigs frequently, and made time for my friends and partner.

I don't know exactly what you're studying but I did a very practical-heavy biomedical science course.

Quick Reply