The Student Room Group

How *not* to send your young adult off to Uni?

inspired by a very kind post by 5hyl33n, I though this might be fun to hear others' stories

I did all the Uni Open Days on my own, there and back by train in a day (parents were too busy working). Which I think is possibly a good thing.

We lived nearly 300 miles from my chosen Uni (which had been an epic Open Day trip!). So when it was time to leave home I packed my rucsac with a weeks worth of clothes, some toiletries and some money.

My parents had arranged for a delivery guy they knew to get me to Coventry overnight in his van (which broke down on the M5 about 2am), from there a retired couple they knew would take me on to the Uni, as they drove to Scotland in their camper (parents were too busy working).

While I appreciate the independence and self reliance this taught me, its not what I would chose for my kids (unless they tell me to)
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 1
I didn't do any Open Days, so far as I recall you just applied and got interviews and went to them. I went to all of them by myself on the train including at least one overnight.

I then took a year out because my offer required it, except that when I got there it seemed no-one else had done so...

And my dad took me in the car, but we didn't know where the halls of residence was and when we finally found it they weren't expecting me because I hadn't replied to some letter or other, so I spent one night in a different room until they found an upstairs one (girls were always put upstairs) and didn't sleep because of all the screaming, shouting, music, running around banging doors etc.
Original post by ChiefBrody
inspired by a very kind post by 5hyl33n, I though this might be fun to hear others' stories

I did all the Uni Open Days on my own, there and back by train in a day (parents were too busy working). Which I think is possibly a good thing.

We lived nearly 300 miles from my chosen Uni (which had been an epic Open Day trip!). So when it was time to leave home I packed my rucsac with a weeks worth of clothes, some toiletries and some money.

My parents had arranged for a delivery guy they knew to get me to Coventry overnight in his van (which broke down on the M5 about 2am), from there a retired couple they knew would take me on to the Uni, as they drove to Scotland in their camper (parents were too busy working).

While I appreciate the independence and self reliance this taught me, its not what I would chose for my kids (unless they tell me to)

Occasionally, I look up my username, and that's precisely what I did a few minutes ago, leading me to discover this thread. :blushing:

I applied to university during 2020/2021 (COVID-19 years). Even though we lived in close proximity to London, my father declined to take me to the university Open Days or show me around the campuses before the pandemic. He reasoned that as a chauffeur frequently working in London, he preferred not to make additional trips unless it was work-related. When COVID-19 struck and we were in lockdown, he proposed that I participate in the online Open Days to save time. However, the virtual format didn't provide the same immersive experience as visiting in person, leaving me uncertain about where to apply.

On the other hand, my mother remained consistently sceptical about my choice to pursue a chemistry degree and continued to question whether it was the right path for me.

While my cousins supported and encouraged me, my aunts and uncles frequently expressed concerns about my ability to cope independently in Cardiff since I had never experienced living on my own.

After coming out from lockdown, restrictions eased, and I managed to convince my parents to take me to Cardiff. It was my top choice at the time (and then only one outside of London), so I wanted to familiarise myself with the city. We coordinated a trip with my cousins, and it went smoothly. I fell in love with the city, solidifying my plan to do chemistry there. I'll be going in my second year now.

Moral of the story:
- Support and encourage your children with whatever they want to pursue. It's their life, not yours.

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