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Should I drop out?

I'm a second year podiatry student but for the whole summer and starting back, I've been questioning myself if I really enjoy what I do and if I even like it anymore. Some days I also realise that it was a rushed decision to study the course because I went through clearing after not achieving the grades I wanted. I'm also on an NHS bursary scheme so does this mean I would have to pay it off? I feel like I'm just stressing myself out. Any help is much appreciated. Should I persevere or should I resit a level biology? Then go back into uni?
(edited 8 months ago)

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If you resat your A level what would you hope to study?
Original post by alggreene
I'm also on an NHS bursary scheme so does this mean I would have to pay it off?


Are you currently studying in Wales or England? If England, then it is the NHS Learning Support Fund you will have received the training grant from and you won't need to pay back any money you received for last year. This term's payment is due after 21 November, so if you do decide to leave your course you need to inform them and you will receive a pro-rata payment for the time you've been in attendance. If you leave after receiving a payment for this term, they will work out if you owe them any overpayment.

More info in the NHS LSF guidance booklet pdf that you can download from here:

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-learning-support-fund-lsf
Original post by normaw
Are you currently studying in Wales or England? If England, then it is the NHS Learning Support Fund you will have received the training grant from and you won't need to pay back any money you received for last year. This term's payment is due after 21 November, so if you do decide to leave your course you need to inform them and you will receive a pro-rata payment for the time you've been in attendance. If you leave after receiving a payment for this term, they will work out if you owe them any overpayment.

More info in the NHS LSF guidance booklet pdf that you can download from here:

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-learning-support-fund-lsf

Thank you !
Original post by PQ
If you resat your A level what would you hope to study?

Radiography. I wanted to do some sort of healthcare degree but podiatry just isn’t sitting well with me anymore.
Original post by alggreene
Radiography. I wanted to do some sort of healthcare degree but podiatry just isn’t sitting well with me anymore.


Are there any postgraduate pathways into radiography?
Original post by alggreene
Radiography. I wanted to do some sort of healthcare degree but podiatry just isn’t sitting well with me anymore.


Does your current uni offer radiography? They might allow a transfer. What A levels or equivalent did you study?
Hi there,

I am sorry to hear you are struggling with this decision. My advice would be to talk to your relevant student services at the uni. Discuss how you're feeling and what options there might be. They might be able to offer some specific advice for what you want to do and could consider helping you switch if possible.

In terms of paying back the money - this may also be a good thing to discuss with the uni. Different schemes have different rules but there may be a deadline to switch in which you wont have to pay back so i would contact either the bursary contact or your university ASAP to discuss.

Good luck with everything,
- Sophie (uni of Bath)
Original post by University of Bath
In terms of paying back the money - this may also be a good thing to discuss with the uni. Different schemes have different rules but there may be a deadline to switch in which you wont have to pay back so i would contact either the bursary contact or your university ASAP to discuss.


The OP's uni does not need to be involved in discussions re the training grant from the the NHS LSF (as explained above). It is the OP's responsibility to inform the NHS LSF directly.
Reply 9
Original post by alggreene
I'm a second year podiatry student but for the whole summer and starting back, I've been questioning myself if I really enjoy what I do and if I even like it anymore. Some days I also realise that it was a rushed decision to study the course because I went through clearing after not achieving the grades I wanted. I'm also on an NHS bursary scheme so does this mean I would have to pay it off? I feel like I'm just stressing myself out. Any help is much appreciated. Should I persevere or should I resit a level biology? Then go back into uni?


Ascertain your financial situation first and foremost. Once that's done, do a really good bit of soul searching. Is it just a bit of natural uncertainty, being in a rut with your studies and angst about the future? If so, those are common and they'll pass. Did you rush in to studying podiatry because you felt you had to study something, didn't want to be left behind and feel as if you'd be a failure if you didn't follow your peers into a university degree as soon as possible? If so, then that's a bit more problematic. I did the same thing in my late teens and I really wished I'd been stronger. Taking a bit of time off the educational conveyor belt can really focus your mind and pay dividends to your future (people I now know did it and they say it was the best decision they made).

I'm not saying to drop out - it really does depend on what you're going to do medium- to long-term. If something isn't for you then that's just as important to know as knowing what *is* for you. If you're attracted to healthcare and human biology then at least you know the general area, which is a positive start. Also, if you finish the degree then at least you have something from which you can earn some money whilst working out what you want to do. I'm not going to get into my rant about podiatry in this thread because that won't help you - plus, I'm a different person with different circumstances.

The main thing to bear in mind that's it not failure to walk away from something. Sometimes it can be the best thing to do because a great many people have caused themselves problems by falling for the sunk cost fallacy and becoming paralysed by fear of the short-term.

Speak to people who have your best interests at heart, such as close family and friends. Be wary of the course lecturers because they, obviously, will be biased and try to keep you on the course. What the lecturers say could be valid, but your family and friends will only be thinking of you and you alone. It's good to make a cool, rationale, logical decision. But don't forget that your gut can give some sage advice, too.

I wish you well in your decision. Just remember that if you're ambitious and willing to work hard then everything will work out for you.
Reply 10
Original post by alggreene
I'm a second year podiatry student but for the whole summer and starting back, I've been questioning myself if I really enjoy what I do and if I even like it anymore. Some days I also realise that it was a rushed decision to study the course because I went through clearing after not achieving the grades I wanted. I'm also on an NHS bursary scheme so does this mean I would have to pay it off? I feel like I'm just stressing myself out. Any help is much appreciated. Should I persevere or should I resit a level biology? Then go back into uni?


Congratulations on being a podiatry student! It's a significant accomplishment that required a lot of hard work. If you're feeling stressed or unsure about your choice, remember why you were interested in podiatry in the first place. It's okay to feel anxious, but try to relax and see how you feel after some time. Additionally, if you're considering retaking your A levels, that's entirely up to you. However, it's worth noting that clearing is a perfectly valid option as well.
Original post by alggreene
I'm a second year podiatry student but for the whole summer and starting back, I've been questioning myself if I really enjoy what I do and if I even like it anymore. Some days I also realise that it was a rushed decision to study the course because I went through clearing after not achieving the grades I wanted. I'm also on an NHS bursary scheme so does this mean I would have to pay it off? I feel like I'm just stressing myself out. Any help is much appreciated. Should I persevere or should I resit a level biology? Then go back into uni?

Sorry @alggreene I have just seen your post!

I'm a podiatry student. Is there any way I can help?

What was it that made you re-consider podiatry over the summer? Have you enjoyed placement?

I had had an interest in podiatry for a long time but I still pursued art and other things before studying podiatry. When I applied I was still unsure about whether it was the right thing as I was looking for a more stable career and the economy which I had assumed would take ages to recover was beginning to pick up again, so I did wonder if I should commit myself to studying again if I could find work? but I have enjoyed the course overall.

I have really enjoyed learning new things and gaining a bigger and fuller picture of what podiatry is and the difference podiatrists can make to patients. I find it great to be able to help a patient practically by helping them to manage their feet. I find it really rewarding : )

Podiatry is not for everybody (not everybody likes looking at feet, let alone touching them!) but do take time to think about what you do and don't like about the course. Would there be similar challenges or expectations if you were to study radiography? Have you looked at different radiography courses and the way they are structured? Is there any way you can find out more about radiography before you potentially switch?

It might be an idea to see how this term goes, while considering your options.

All the best,

Oluwatosin 3rd year student University of Huddersfield
Original post by alggreene
Radiography. I wanted to do some sort of healthcare degree but podiatry just isn’t sitting well with me anymore.

There's quite a few pre-registration, PGDip/MSc radiography courses: https://www.collegeofradiographers.ac.uk/getattachment/Education/Directory-of-pre-registration-programmes/2023-07-11-Pre-registration-Course-Directory.pdf?lang=en-GB

These would take you the same amount of time to qualify as restarting from yr 1 on a BSc in Autumn 2024 (you'd be starting a 2 year postgraduate course in Autumn 2025 after qualifying with your current course).
Original post by NJBSaidit
Ascertain your financial situation first and foremost. Once that's done, do a really good bit of soul searching. Is it just a bit of natural uncertainty, being in a rut with your studies and angst about the future? If so, those are common and they'll pass. Did you rush in to studying podiatry because you felt you had to study something, didn't want to be left behind and feel as if you'd be a failure if you didn't follow your peers into a university degree as soon as possible? If so, then that's a bit more problematic. I did the same thing in my late teens and I really wished I'd been stronger. Taking a bit of time off the educational conveyor belt can really focus your mind and pay dividends to your future (people I now know did it and they say it was the best decision they made).

I'm not saying to drop out - it really does depend on what you're going to do medium- to long-term. If something isn't for you then that's just as important to know as knowing what *is* for you. If you're attracted to healthcare and human biology then at least you know the general area, which is a positive start. Also, if you finish the degree then at least you have something from which you can earn some money whilst working out what you want to do. I'm not going to get into my rant about podiatry in this thread because that won't help you - plus, I'm a different person with different circumstances.

The main thing to bear in mind that's it not failure to walk away from something. Sometimes it can be the best thing to do because a great many people have caused themselves problems by falling for the sunk cost fallacy and becoming paralysed by fear of the short-term.

Speak to people who have your best interests at heart, such as close family and friends. Be wary of the course lecturers because they, obviously, will be biased and try to keep you on the course. What the lecturers say could be valid, but your family and friends will only be thinking of you and you alone. It's good to make a cool, rationale, logical decision. But don't forget that your gut can give some sage advice, too.

I wish you well in your decision. Just remember that if you're ambitious and willing to work hard then everything will work out for you.

Hi I just private messaged you. Thank you for the help :smile:
Reply 14
Original post by username6468931
Hi I just private messaged you. Thank you for the help :smile:


No problem - you'd better change your settings because it says I can't reply to you on private message :smile:
Original post by Dreamer36
It's only gonna get worse; if your not feeling it leave before you get into more debt. There is no bright light at the end of a podiatry course , just more uphill and struggle .

Think about it ; NHS jobs are not a given and even if u get one working as a band 5 Mon-Fri is horrendous money, todays cost of living ain't cheap. Most Nurses working B5 ; have thier wages made up with unsociable hrs pay.

Whats the alternative to working in the NHS private practice ! OK let's break this down ; you will be working in presumably a small clinic , working to make someone else rich whilst earning a modest wage. A lot of them work for themselves within a private clinic ; no holiday pay, sick pay , no promotion opportunities and I doubt u will earn enough to justify the lack of stability.

Why not open a private clinic ; personally I don't have a business brain or the drive to make somthing like that work , or the finances to back it . Some pods will be really successful in private practice however a lot will be struggling. Plus the initial expense to set up the business , support yourself whilst u build up a client base. Some would say I'm a pessimist however I'm also a realist.

In contrast ; I'm doing a Nursing degree , I already have job offers and I have just started my final yr . The health board also find graduates our first b5 gig, they are desprite for staff. I will work 3 long days (12hr shifts) leaving me 4 days off were I can work agency or on the staff bank making more money . As a B5 nurse I will also make more money than someone working B5 mon-fri , we get time and a half for sat + nights and just under double time for Sunday. Check out agency staff nurse money your talking £500 per shift , I'm literally bathing in opportunity and cant wait to get that registration . I never felt this way when I was studying podiatry.

I believe if your putting in the hard work you should be buzzing with opportunity , if you don't feel your going to change your life you need a new game plan .

If your determined to work on NHS I would recommend a Nursing course , physio or OT . Seems to be more jobs within these areas


@Dreamer36 I Usually read over your comments about Podiatry and I laugh but I thought today I would respond to you. Everyone has their own opinions but it's irritating when you don't have actual life experience regarding the point you are making..

1) Uphill struggle after you qualify- have you qualified as a podiatrist before and attempted to search for a job? Do you know any podiatrists who have struggled to find a job? The NHS are giving Podiatry students extra bursary money just due to the fact there is a shortage and they need more people. Have you even bothered looking at the NHS job board for podiatrists (evidently not ofc), there is a ton of openings with more being added monthly.

2)It's terrible money- Podiatrists start off at the same band as nurses so what are you chatting about? Yes you have unsociable hours pay but you get worked to the absolute bone- I rather keep my health rather than an extra couple hundred a month. As a podiatrist you can move to band 6 after a year and then by the time you finish your part time masters(after 2 years of working), you will be eligible for band 7 which is roughly £42-50k. There also wayyyyy more opportunities to progress to band 8-9 as there is more posts for senior podiatrist ie the surgeons than a chief nurse where there might only be a couple available around the country. I just don't understand why you are slating the pay when by the sounds of things you have no experience in either profession.

You have posted a lot that's negative about Podiatry even though you are someone who did it briefly. I feel like you are trying to make yourself feel better for sacking off podiatry for nursing because something happened wherever you were studying ie maybe you fell out with the staff/students or simply because the course was not taught at the standard you had hoped for. Regardless of that, a lot of your comments have 0 merit and are pure assumptions. I know people who have qualified recently as podiatrists and founds jobs no issue, I have talked to people who have recently secured trainee podiatric surgery roles, and I have family members who are nurses so I have half a leg to stand on compared to you. I'm happy you find nursing fulfilling and you might earn an extra couple hundred quid per year at the start, but you will be worked till you drop, you will work at ridiculous hours and have less opportunities to progress at the higher bands. As mentioned I have family members who are nurses and I respect nurses greatly, I think they are vital to the NHS, I just list the cons to someone who feels bitter about podiatry and uses it as a scapegoat to make themselves feel better about changing courses, and obviously has not done their own research in the cons of their chosen profession.
Reply 16
Original post by Verdasco
Ah the classic "you're hurt with what I said" comment when someone calls you out for misinformation lol...

You can't say you're giving advice because all you've done is slate one profession and be super biased towards another- your only advice has been to sack off podiatry due to your own unfortunate circumstances.

And you talk about clout, how old are you? A mature individual who is training to be a healthcare professional should not even be talking about clout... god help us when people like you are somehow put in positions of power, you'll be looking down on everyone below you. I do pray for the people you work with you change your attitude and stop thinking about "clout" when it comes to working in the NHS, everyone is equally as important. I get the feeling you were not smart enough for medicine if you're interesting in clout chasing, and thank god for that.

I wish you luck as well and hope throughout your development you lose this self entitlement attitude where you think one profession warrants " much more clout" than the other. In terms of pay let's compare pay in 5 years time- only way of settling it.

Boys and girls if you want to do Nursing and you're passionate about it then do it, if you're passionate about Podiatry, OT or Physio then do it. But for the love of god don't be like this individual here who is obviously looking to fill that gaping hole of insecurity by "clout" chasing. You are going to be healthcare professionals and be in positions of trust- please leave all that school boy attitude behind if you wish to be respected and successful.


That post is personal abuse and I'm surprised it's allowed to stand.

I am also negative about podiatry as a profession. (It really should go back to being chiropody because, let's be honest, that's actually what it is.) But my intention in writing my posts is to correct some faulty thinking about the course and career as a whole. There is a lot of Pollyannaish thinking about podiatry that floats about online, perpetuated by universities and first-year students, all of whom have their reasons for doing so. I fell for it myself after years of wondering why so few people worked in a profession that seemed to offer so much.

Too many of us have been misled into studying podiatry because of the 'foot doctor' myth. If prospective candidates are aware that the scope of podiatry is limited and that most of their day will be taken up with repetitive, mundane tasks then that's fine. Some people are aware of the reality but are happy working in that role. There's nothing shameful about that. Most jobs become routine after a while. I'm not going to condemn anyone for wanting to earn a decent day's pay instead of slobbing about on the sofa. But if you enter a profession after being told that it's a potential gold mine, varied, rewarding and full of prestige, and then you find the reality is nowhere near it, you might feel inclined to warn others (or at least give them a gentle heads up). Some students have the idea that podiatry is 'easy money': charge £30 per hour to vulnerable older people to do basic treatments that could be done for next to nothing by someone with some basic training. It's a bit like training as a plumber or mechanic and rubbing your hands together at the thought of all those laypeople people you could rip off. Podiatry attracts the full range.

An interesting discovery is finding out how podiatry staff members at universities all fell into podiatry as a second or third choice. Also interesting is how they ditched full-time practice at a very early stage of their careers to teach it, which is odd given how well-paid, rewarding and varied it is... You'd think they might start teaching towards the latter or mid-part of their careers... If you do a bit of detective work then you can find how others admit to wanting to give up their podiatry work for something completely different. A little of of extra detective work reveals how the higher-level students ditch podiatry after a few years to retrain because the routine nature of the work becomes just too much for them.

Maybe I'm being too unfair on podiatry and it's a good career that I let slip through my fingers. Then again, when you find yourself sat in IPE lectures with other degree students and you start feeling like a fraud and even embarrassed by how low level your own degree content is in comparison with theirs, it gives you food for thought.

Ultimately, salary and opportunities for advancement are ultra important. We all want to follow out passions, but very few people are able to do that in life (after all, if everyone followed their "passion", we'd have a workforce mostly full of cupcake makers, footballers, ballerinas, photographers, TikTok influencers and actors). The closest to a passion that we're talking about here is a desire to help others. There are professions other than podiatry where you can do that, plus earn a decent wage, have a varied workload and have more job opportunities.

Boys and girls, podiatrists are NOT foot doctors and - like your granny no doubt once warned you - if it sounds too good to be true then it probably is.
Reply 17
Original post by Verdasco
Another Student who did not do their due diligence and do their own research when they chose to do Podiatry. 99% of students are aware Podiatrists are not foot doctors- we are more than aware that we are not medically trained so why keep bringing it up in your supposed evidence backed reason in why so many people are tricked into Podiatry. In fact not once since I have been studying have I heard someone use the term foot doctor, I honestly don't know which la la land you're in or which University tricked you, please do share!

You say it's mundane with limited scope. There is so many different pathways you can take and specialise... you can do MSK, diabetes, sports, MSK, Forensics, surgery and many more. I do agree some pathways like Forensics and Forensics there are limited spaces but still I have found numerous individuals on Linkedln who are currently training in those pathways, so they do definitely exist! We are aware there are limited spaces in those pathways and we don't choose Podiatry based on the assumption we will become Surgeons or the supposed "foot doctor". For the advanced pathways you do need to be a high achiever and intelligent, so naturally a lot of people are capped. Why blame the profession for your own fault of going to a poor University for Podiatry where the course was not taught at the expected level and where the majority of the people (maybe including yourself) have to stay content with doing the "mundane tasks" after qualifying because they do not have mental capacity to take on more advanced academic and practical studies. Of course it's going to be mundane if you stay at band 5 forever, that is why you do more studying so you can specialise, why question the profession when it's in fact your lack of motivation and intelligence that stop's you advancing to the less "mundane" tasks?

Again, where's your hard evidence that every single Podiatry Staff member at University fell into Podiatry as a 2nd or 3rd choice? Honestly what a far fetched and ill thought of comment to make, is this the intelligence of this generation of students. Your detective work is nothing more than asking 1 or 2 lecturers at your University, which you've smartly taken to mean the whole population. Do you not think to use that intelligent brain of yours to think that some individuals finish their podiatry career or are teaching while they work? Even if some people want to go straight into teaching- whats it to you, get off your high horse.

Boys and girls, we know we are not "foot doctors" and medically trained. The job will be mundane if you choose not to take on advance studies and specialise but if you have the motivation and mental capacity, you will more than succeed. Please don't be like this individual who assumes the profession is mundane just because they lack the motivation/mental capacity to progress to the more advanced Pod roles. Any job is mundane if you stay at the same level forever.

And I do agree there are people ripping others off for basic treatment because they are leaches and have 0 morales. I don't agree with this one bit but not everyone is like this and you do get this in any health profession.


Once again, a post that involves ad hominem throughout. That's disappointing.

Where's YOUR hard evidence? I'm stating my experiences and you are stating your experiences. We're two random, anonymous people on the internet, yet your approach to debate involves saying, "My experiences are true and yours are not, so boo to you."

You admit in one of your posts that nurses are overworked and the job is stressful, whilst podiatry is a good deal in comparison. That's admitting nursing is more worthwhile and more greatly respected. That kind of thing is important to some people, not everyone. How do your colleagues in other roles view podiatrists when they see them breeze in, cut some toe nails and do some scraping, whilst they are being "run into the ground"? How do you think doctors or physios view specialised podiatrists? Do you think they bow down to their greater knowledge?

You like podiatry. That's good. Nobody said it wasn't. I've always maintained that podiatry can be a great fit if you couldn't get the grades for the more varied, sought-after careers; or if you have kids and want something to fit around it; or wanted a health-related career without the stress of the more respected professions. That's why virtually every single person on my course was studying podiatry, apart from the couple whose families were podiatrists. That's not a slight on you or sarcasm; it's what happened. None of the staff members aimed to do podiatry, and I know that because they told me. Maybe I shouldn't be extrapolating from half a dozen people and applying it as a wider theory. But when people in other universities hundreds of miles away have identical experiences it certainly makes you wonder.

Here's a word of advice: stop insulting people when in a discussion because it cheapens your argument.
Reply 18
Original post by Verdasco
Another Student who did not do their due diligence and do their own research when they chose to do Podiatry. 99% of students are aware Podiatrists are not foot doctors- we are more than aware that we are not medically trained so why keep bringing it up in your supposed evidence backed reason in why so many people are tricked into Podiatry. In fact not once since I have been studying have I heard someone use the term foot doctor, I honestly don't know which la la land you're in or which University tricked you, please do share!

You say it's mundane with limited scope. There is so many different pathways you can take and specialise... you can do MSK, diabetes, sports, MSK, Forensics, surgery and many more. I do agree some pathways like Forensics and Forensics there are limited spaces but still I have found numerous individuals on Linkedln who are currently training in those pathways, so they do definitely exist! We are aware there are limited spaces in those pathways and we don't choose Podiatry based on the assumption we will become Surgeons or the supposed "foot doctor". For the advanced pathways you do need to be a high achiever and intelligent, so naturally a lot of people are capped. Why blame the profession for your own fault of going to a poor University for Podiatry where the course was not taught at the expected level and where the majority of the people (maybe including yourself) have to stay content with doing the "mundane tasks" after qualifying because they do not have mental capacity to take on more advanced academic and practical studies. Of course it's going to be mundane if you stay at band 5 forever, that is why you do more studying so you can specialise, why question the profession when it's in fact your lack of motivation and intelligence that stop's you advancing to the less "mundane" tasks?

Again, where's your hard evidence that every single Podiatry Staff member at University fell into Podiatry as a 2nd or 3rd choice? Honestly what a far fetched and ill thought of comment to make, is this the intelligence of this generation of students. Your detective work is nothing more than asking 1 or 2 lecturers at your University, which you've smartly taken to mean the whole population. Do you not think to use that intelligent brain of yours to think that some individuals finish their podiatry career or are teaching while they work? Even if some people want to go straight into teaching- whats it to you, get off your high horse.

Boys and girls, we know we are not "foot doctors" and medically trained. The job will be mundane if you choose not to take on advance studies and specialise but if you have the motivation and mental capacity, you will more than succeed. Please don't be like this individual who assumes the profession is mundane just because they lack the motivation/mental capacity to progress to the more advanced Pod roles. Any job is mundane if you stay at the same level forever.

And I do agree there are people ripping others off for basic treatment because they are leaches and have 0 morales. I don't agree with this one bit but not everyone is like this and you do get this in any health profession.


It's also a good idea to read what I wrote. I said "some" students regard podiatry as easy money by overcharging the public. Hence my use of the word "range".

Also, we aren't talking about someone doing a bit of lecturing to supplement their income whilst training. We're talking about people jumping ship asap. Beware of those people in any profession, not just pod. Why would anyone who has excellent academic ability and a high interpersonal skillset choose the limited scope of podiatry over medicine, dentistry, physio or specialist nursing? It's because podiatry has lower stress levels due to the limited scope and it's is easier to get on the course. There are no other reasons. For example, why would someone become a plumber but not train to become Gas Safe-registered? That's right: because it's easier and has less responsibility. It's not an insult; it's just the reality.

Once again, let me make it clear to you what I'm saying. If you choose podiatry, good for you. If you're aware of what it involves, great. If the scope of work suits you, great. If you're happy with the job opportunities and chances for progression, great. If you're happy with the impact you have on patients in comparison to other health professions, great. If you find that your abilities and expectations exceed the realities when you're a couple of years in then don't say you weren't warned. Still, you can always end up teaching podiatry because it's more varied and tell people the reason there are fewer students is merely due to people not liking feet.

"What's it you"; "high horse" - what sort of little digs are those? This is a discussion forum that encourages views about podiatry and I'm giving views about podiatry. I hope that's okay with you. I am no longer engaging with you.
Reply 19
Literally everything I have written is based on my own personal experience of podiatry and healthcare . With the intention of sharing information to potential student's with the purpose of opening thier eyes about what they are getting into; to help them make a more informed decision about their future .

Obviously I'm going to upset a few people within the profession, I was expecting a bit of backlash.

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