The Student Room Group

revising veterinary medicine

Any advice on how to start revising well as a vet student , methods that work well for you, apps, etc? tips would be much appreciated! :smile:
I've got some tips on things like that in my study blog on here and you can also see some of the things I do on the daily. It is completely what works for you, like most people I know use flash cards which are utterly useless for me. For me lectures and generally watching videos isn't very good but it works for others. I prefer making summary tables on every topic, drawing and labelling for things like anatomy, I do hand written notes to go through lectures initially, type up LOs during lectures if I go, occasionally things like making and hanging up posters is useful and I go over topics by practicing using my summary tables or with mind maps. I personally love the Forest app for tracking how much I do on each subject and I do the blog purely to help organise and motivate myself tbh. Some websites like VIN are useful for some.
Reply 2
I find flash cards helpful for learning little details and anatomy and also find them useful for testing what I know. I always have digital ones as I end up making loads so it’s a bit impossible to have physical ones! I personally like using quizlet but I a lot of my coursemates also use anki. If you do choose to use flash cards, I’d recommend making them as you go along rather than in the run up to an exam as you don’t want to spend that time making resources, you want to spend it testing yourself.

For learning things like processes or cascades, I found investing in a whiteboard to be really worthwhile. I’d write what I knew in the cascade from memory in one colour, look at a copy of the complete cascade when I was done, and then fill in what I couldn’t remember in another colour. I’d then repeat that for another cascade and do as many as I could until I’d memorised it well.

Another trick I found really helped for in the run up to my anatomy exams was rewatching the dissection videos a few days before on 2X speed and writing down everything I wasn’t 100% on and then looking that up afterwards.

Finally, don’t burn yourself out by revising every free minute you get! It’s important to take time off every now and then and enjoy your hobbies and see friends. Just remember- a vet who passes with 50% is just as much a vet as someone who passes with 100% and there is a lot more to being a good vet than having top grades in everything.

As @RambleAmple says, it really does depend on what works for you and be open to changing revision techniques if you find certain methods aren’t helpful. It took me until the end of 2nd year to find out which methods really didn’t work for me, and even now as a 4th year I feel like I’m still learning!
Reply 3
Original post by Vetgirl07
I find flash cards helpful for learning little details and anatomy and also find them useful for testing what I know. I always have digital ones as I end up making loads so it’s a bit impossible to have physical ones! I personally like using quizlet but I a lot of my coursemates also use anki. If you do choose to use flash cards, I’d recommend making them as you go along rather than in the run up to an exam as you don’t want to spend that time making resources, you want to spend it testing yourself.

For learning things like processes or cascades, I found investing in a whiteboard to be really worthwhile. I’d write what I knew in the cascade from memory in one colour, look at a copy of the complete cascade when I was done, and then fill in what I couldn’t remember in another colour. I’d then repeat that for another cascade and do as many as I could until I’d memorised it well.

Another trick I found really helped for in the run up to my anatomy exams was rewatching the dissection videos a few days before on 2X speed and writing down everything I wasn’t 100% on and then looking that up afterwards.

Finally, don’t burn yourself out by revising every free minute you get! It’s important to take time off every now and then and enjoy your hobbies and see friends. Just remember- a vet who passes with 50% is just as much a vet as someone who passes with 100% and there is a lot more to being a good vet than having top grades in everything.

As @RambleAmple says, it really does depend on what works for you and be open to changing revision techniques if you find certain methods aren’t helpful. It took me until the end of 2nd year to find out which methods really didn’t work for me, and even now as a 4th year I feel like I’m still learning!

Thank you both so much for taking the time to write such detailed responses! Appreciate your advice :smile:

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