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Advice on subject combinations

Im thinking of picking psychology, law and business in my A-Levels. Is this a good combination and what are the pros and cons of picking these?
Original post by mehxmer
Im thinking of picking psychology, law and business in my A-Levels. Is this a good combination and what are the pros and cons of picking these?


May I ask what career path you have in mind? I did business for a year (dropped it) and my sis did psychology. Pros of business: if you did it during GCSE the transition will be easy. Cons: if you truly want to do business then A level business would be a good choice. However if you don’t want to business at uni taking business will narrow down your course choices. Think you should take math instead as it will still allow you to pursue business and other courses. For me business was just boring and it was never my passion. Also keep in mind if you want to do law you don’t need to necessarily take law at A levels. For my sis A level psych was quite content heavy but she truly enjoyed it (since GCSE). She did AS psych which I think helped with managing content in Y13. Cons: as always, a lot of memorising and case studies were a real pain. If you don’t have a specific career in mind I think your A level combination might limit you in terms of courses you will be eligible to apply to.
Reply 2
Hi, im thinking of doing Law possibly because my essay based skills are pretty strong. No i didnt do business nor psychology for GCSE but i did do law and i find it quite fun to do. I like maths but i dont know if i will get a decent grade in it since i kind of struggle in GCSE maths too. Yes same both my sisters did A level psychology and managed to get an A* in it, im still not sure on what is the best option for me but thankyou for the advicee
Original post by mehxmer
Hi, im thinking of doing Law possibly because my essay based skills are pretty strong. No i didnt do business nor psychology for GCSE but i did do law and i find it quite fun to do. I like maths but i dont know if i will get a decent grade in it since i kind of struggle in GCSE maths too. Yes same both my sisters did A level psychology and managed to get an A* in it, im still not sure on what is the best option for me but thankyou for the advicee

Basically any combination of traditionally academic subjects is fine for law (essay based or not). Business studies may sometimes not be considered to fall into that category (notably by LSE) but otherwise it's fine really for the vast majority.
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
Basically any combination of traditionally academic subjects is fine for law (essay based or not). Business studies may sometimes not be considered to fall into that category (notably by LSE) but otherwise it's fine really for the vast majority.

Aaaaa thankyouu this helped me clear alot of confusion on what to doo but yh i feel like business opens up alot of the marketing aspects, something that isnt regularly taught in schools tbh.
Original post by mehxmer
Aaaaa thankyouu this helped me clear alot of confusion on what to doo but yh i feel like business opens up alot of the marketing aspects, something that isnt regularly taught in schools tbh.

What is the relevance of that though?

Working as a solicitor or barrister isn't really about marketing - the corporations or sets you have will have professionals do that for them presumably, and besides that it's about networking which is different - and whatever simple content can be contained in the A-level is a) not going to be sophisticated enough to be of any use practically and b) may well be out of date by the time you're a working professional.

You should take A-levels based on intellectual interest or because they're specifically required (and the university will state this) by the course(s) you want to apply to. Don't take them because of some false notion that it'll ever be useful as a working professional - that's not what A-levels are for.

If you want a level 3 qualification which will translate directly to relevance in the work place you should be looking at vocational or technical qualifications (which lead to very different career paths).
(edited 7 months ago)
Reply 6
true i understand yor point and what you mean by that but law doesnt specifically require any subjects as long as you have the grades for it, its all about your skills and you can acquire many skills from business, similarly you can go into corporate law, or have jobs like a commercial solicitor or be part of a legal council because business covers aspects of law which could be in correlation with eachother
Original post by mehxmer
Hi, im thinking of doing Law possibly because my essay based skills are pretty strong. No i didnt do business nor psychology for GCSE but i did do law and i find it quite fun to do. I like maths but i dont know if i will get a decent grade in it since i kind of struggle in GCSE maths too. Yes same both my sisters did A level psychology and managed to get an A* in it, im still not sure on what is the best option for me but thankyou for the advicee

Hi there, it's nice to hear that you are already thinking about your University options.

Most Universities will accept your A levels as the focus is mainly on the grades you achieve. (if you are worried about this, do research on the University's enter requirements). I am a third year law student, but I took sciences and maths for A levels. So focusing on getting would help you secure a good University.

Law A levels will give you a good head start during the first year of your degree. It is good to hear that you are good at writing essays as it will be really important in University. (I never took psychology or business, but if any of them will assist you with essay writing it will be beneficial.) Perhaps you can link studying business in A levels to interests in commercial law in your personal statement? (I am not too sure on this though).

What matter is that you will achieve good grades in your A level exams, so pick subjects that you feel more confident in doing. Having an interest in the subject will also help motivate you to study. :smile:

Another tip I can suggest is trying to secure any work experience you can get, whether this be in person or online legal work experience (you can typically find these by exploring larger law firm websites). Even if you are unable to secure legal work experience, any jobs or volunteering you will have done should have transferrable skills which you can reflect on.

Good luck with your applications.
I hope this helps.
Chloe
-University of Kent Student Rep

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