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studying a maths and computer science degree and found out course isn't accredited!

Is this a problem or is it fine? I want to work in the tech sector and I want to have the option to pursue a masters later on in the technology field.
Please help me with this problem!
Original post by lolapaloza
Is this a problem or is it fine? I want to work in the tech sector and I want to have the option to pursue a masters later on in the technology field.
Please help me with this problem!

I don't work in tech, so take it with a pinch of salt. However, if my knowledge of the sector across the world is still valid, I don't think it particularly matters.

Maths is not governed by any professional body. Tech also isn't, even though there are plenty of professional bodies in the sector.

The master's in tech doesn't depend on you having an accredited degree. They will care whether your undergrad has sufficient content that meets their entry requirements. As you have not specified which specific subject or master's you're interested in doing, it's a bit up in the air at this moment in time.

In terms of job requirements, as far as I know the emloyers tend to care whether you have the skills for the job as opposed what qualifications you have. If you have a recognised qualification accredited by a specific body or organisation, great. If not, it's not the end of the world.
The professional qualification (not degree) tends to be more appropriate for people who don't have a background in computer science or tech. So if you did a degree in say sociology and want to work in tech, you can go in if you have the skills (even though it's a lot more difficult) or have a professional qualification suited for the specific role (which can speed things up).

I would like to say that employers would look more into what projects you have done as opposed what degree you did (even if it's a relevant subject), I'm a little at risk of being corrected/bulldozed by someone who actually works in tech. Some employers do ask for a CS degree, but I think they care about the skills you have more than the theory that you know - I could be wrong though.

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