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LNAT essay

Hiikm
(edited 6 months ago)
Reply 1
Just my opinion but LNAT is too important to get random anonymous people to mark your essays, how do you know if they are giving you good advice? Personally I'd find a tutor or one of the LNAT prep companies to have a look as they are specialists. If you can't afford it maybe one of your teachers will volunteer to do it.
Reply 2
Original post by Anayop
Just my opinion but LNAT is too important to get random anonymous people to mark your essays, how do you know if they are giving you good advice? Personally I'd find a tutor or one of the LNAT prep companies to have a look as they are specialists. If you can't afford it maybe one of your teachers will volunteer to do it.

I just thought it would be useful to get some general feedback from people who have perhaps already sat the exam :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by Hahaha2006
Hey,
My LNAT is really close, and as Im struggling with the essay, I would really appreciate if anyone could give me some feedback on an essay I wrote under timed conditions.
Thanks in advance!
Q: In the future, should parents be able to choose the sex of their children?

In an age of increasing family planning and heightened disease, I am of the opinion that parents ought to be able to choose the sex of their children. I will assume that choosing the sex of children in the future will have no medical and health implications. Firstly and most importantly, the medical advantages outweigh the societal moral dilemma that could stem from such a policy. Secondly, there are also advanatges culturally.
The nature of medical ethics dictates the absolute importance of children living, maximised, healthy lives. It is for this reason that gives my argument such weight. With the current advancements in technology, parents are able to take extensive tests in order to calculate their propensity for carrying particular hereditary conditions, such as Alzheimers, which would incredibly encroach on one's life and reduce the quality of a person's life. By having the option to choose the sex of a child, parents would be able to make informed choices, such as the choice to choose a gender that would be less susceptible to inheriting certain medical conditions that would reuduce the quality of their life. This not only protects parents from the particularly volatile, uncontrollable nature of childbirth by giving them the security of choice, but it would also have wider societal benefits such as a generally healtheir future generation. To prevent parents from the security that choice provides would be antithetical to the very principle of medical ethics if we take the assumption that the purpose of medicine is to maximise the health and welfare of individuals.

To elaborate on the advanatges of such a system, it is important to consider also the social benefits that would be reaped. For many cultures, and indeed throughout history, many families desire an equal balance and mix between sons an daughters to promote the harmony of the family unit. This stems from the consideration of traditional roles that, throughout history, have been considered to be intrinsic to a particular gender. For instance, the mix of caregiving and breadwinning roles that may be associated with a particular gender would indeed contribute to a balanced distribution of responsibilities, thus fostering a sense of equality within the family unit. To prevent the choosing of genders would encroach on the interests of certian parents from particular cultures that value the principle of family balancing so deeply.

However, it is important to consider the societal reprecussions that could very possibly limit the benefits that such a system would bring. The God-like ability to alter the sex of a child, something so intrinsic to their being, could indeed be considered an excess of freedom. With an excess of freedom comes the dangers of chaos within society. The threat of societal imbalances caused by a skewed sex ratio within the population would be detrimental to the continuation of the human race due to the implication on reproduction. Furthermore, if this skewed sex ratio truly did come to fruition in the far future, it could perpetuate strict and harmful gender stereotypes that society has fought so recently to erradicate in the past 30 years. The devaluation of one gender over another is a seismic risk that threatens the progression equality and could return the world to its unfair roots.

In conclusion, i'd lie to reiterate the importance of allowing parents to choose the sex of their children in the name of fostering harmony within the family unit, as well as promoting the health of future populations by making parents more informed when confronted with the decision of having children. While it is a fair arument that the threat of societal imbalances could set the world back in its ideology, it is highly unlikely that a population would become so skewed that the progress of society would be impacted. Indeed, to prevent such an impact, a government could carefully regulate and moniter the choosing of genders, intervening once they notice a skew in the sex ratio. Therefore, especially by abiding by the principle of medical ethics that dictates the paramount nature of a healthy population, we can deduce that the ability to choose the sex of children in the future should be allowed.

Hi! My LNAT is tomorrow and I am also struggling a little bit with the essay, I would appreciate it if you could share some tips on how you wrote this one! Also, excuse my nosiness but where will you apply?
And for some feedback personally, I wouldn’t have chosen to be for deciding the children’s sex as it could easily be countered with ethical issues and the rising of the LGBTQ movement. But apart from that, I think the way you have written your essay is really good but you have some occasional typos which you should be careful about. Best of luck!

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