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didnt pass physics GCSE tryna do biochem/chem degree

got beneath a 4 for phy do you reckon itd mess up my chances of getting into a russel group? Im doing really well on an AA for bio chem & a C in maths is it even worth wasting time on physics cause I have to teach myself from A to Z cause I literally never learnt physics at all & was then forced to sit the GCSE
Sorry you've not had any responses about this. :frown: Are you sure you've posted in the right place? :smile: Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there. :redface:
Reply 2
Unis will usually tell you what GCSEs they want or prefer for a degree course.

Typically this is only Maths and English, but unless they say 'science GCSEs will be assessed' or similar, they will be FAR more interested in your A level predicted grades and one GCSE grade will not be a deal breaker..

What is your C grade prediction in ?
As above unis tend to only either be interested in minimum grades in specified GCSE subjects (normally just English language and maths; a few unis/courses - mainly medicine - may also want minimum grades in combined science or equivalent), or otherwise just your overall GCSE profile.

I think though it is important for you to recognise this may be an indication you would struggle with a chemistry or some biochemistry degrees, and either make an active effort to improve upon that or consider a wider range of options. Chemistry at degree level necessarily involves a fair bit of physics. Basically all the physical chemistry content (or most of it at least) is essentially applied physics.

Biochemistry does incorporate some of these same areas as in chemistry (to a lesser degree normally though) plus I believe some other physics-related topics crop up. However I think this is probably less prevalent outside of a narrow range of courses (e.g. Oxford, Cambridge, perhaps Imperial). At most UK unis otherwise biochemistry is effectively a degree in molecular and cell biology.

Note equally maths is an important skill in general in the sciences and chemistry at degree level does involve more than just GCSE Maths - and if you are struggling with GCSE Maths (where the grade boundaries are I gather quite generous) this may indicate you would struggle with e.g. the basic calculus and simple matrix algebra involved in degree level chemistry. This again applies somewhat to biochemistry but to a somewhat lesser extent and more so the same few courses noted above, although generally biochemistry is the bioscience area where you're more likely to do more than just quite basic maths plus stats I gather.

So, overall I think the concern here is less about admissions and more about success on the course once you get onto it. I appreciate as a school student often everything is built up into concerns about just getting onto your degree programme of choice, but remember that's just step 1 - then you need to actually complete the three years of study, and usually people want to do well! If you have a weaker background in relevant areas, even if not strictly required for admission, you may find it a much bigger challenge to successfully complete the programme and/or do well in it.

Just something to keep in mind - if you're able and willing to keep working at those areas as well then it may not be an absolute issue, but worth considering so you can go into things with your eyes open :smile:
Original post by McGinger
Unis will usually tell you what GCSEs they want or prefer for a degree course.

Typically this is only Maths and English, but unless they say 'science GCSEs will be assessed' or similar, they will be FAR more interested in your A level predicted grades and one GCSE grade will not be a deal breaker..

What is your C grade prediction in ?

Im on a C in maths A level & an AA in biology & chemistry A levels
(edited 5 months ago)
Original post by artful_lounger
As above unis tend to only either be interested in minimum grades in specified GCSE subjects (normally just English language and maths; a few unis/courses - mainly medicine - may also want minimum grades in combined science or equivalent), or otherwise just your overall GCSE profile.

I think though it is important for you to recognise this may be an indication you would struggle with a chemistry or some biochemistry degrees, and either make an active effort to improve upon that or consider a wider range of options. Chemistry at degree level necessarily involves a fair bit of physics. Basically all the physical chemistry content (or most of it at least) is essentially applied physics.

Biochemistry does incorporate some of these same areas as in chemistry (to a lesser degree normally though) plus I believe some other physics-related topics crop up. However I think this is probably less prevalent outside of a narrow range of courses (e.g. Oxford, Cambridge, perhaps Imperial). At most UK unis otherwise biochemistry is effectively a degree in molecular and cell biology.

Note equally maths is an important skill in general in the sciences and chemistry at degree level does involve more than just GCSE Maths - and if you are struggling with GCSE Maths (where the grade boundaries are I gather quite generous) this may indicate you would struggle with e.g. the basic calculus and simple matrix algebra involved in degree level chemistry. This again applies somewhat to biochemistry but to a somewhat lesser extent and more so the same few courses noted above, although generally biochemistry is the bioscience area where you're more likely to do more than just quite basic maths plus stats I gather.

So, overall I think the concern here is less about admissions and more about success on the course once you get onto it. I appreciate as a school student often everything is built up into concerns about just getting onto your degree programme of choice, but remember that's just step 1 - then you need to actually complete the three years of study, and usually people want to do well! If you have a weaker background in relevant areas, even if not strictly required for admission, you may find it a much bigger challenge to successfully complete the programme and/or do well in it.

Just something to keep in mind - if you're able and willing to keep working at those areas as well then it may not be an absolute issue, but worth considering so you can go into things with your eyes open :smile:

I apologise-I dont think I clarified myself properly in the original post. I am doing bio chem & maths a levels rn & am in y12. I'm on an AA in bio chem & Im basically the one of the top in my class in both of those subjects but Im on a C in maths. I didnt pass physics GCSE & would have to resit it on june/july & teach myself the whole GCSE from scratch (Ive only briefly touched on forces & motion, energy & electricity)
Original post by canthinkofone
I apologise-I dont think I clarified myself properly in the original post. I am doing bio chem & maths a levels rn & am in y12. I'm on an AA in bio chem & Im basically the one of the top in my class in both of those subjects but Im on a C in maths. I didnt pass physics GCSE & would have to resit it on june/july & teach myself the whole GCSE from scratch (Ive only briefly touched on forces & motion, energy & electricity)


Well I think my point stands still - keep in mind the mathematical and physics elements involved in those two subjects relative to your strengths.

Best of luck with your resit and bringing up your maths work :smile:

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