What could I do with a philosophy degree? Watch

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-G-a-v-
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#1
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I guess the subject of this thread pretty much sums up what I want to know. I'd quite like to study Philosophy at University, but I want to know what I could do with it. I'd probably combine it with either Mathematics or Physics.
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PQ
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Have a look at the websites linked in the stickied thread
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TomX
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You could always become an elite martial artist, well that's what Bruce Lee did with his Philosophy degree :P
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James377
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not much! all the student i see studying philosophy sit on the lawn all day outside uni and do sweat FA or are you contemplating??? thin line to me!any1 else agree is this a common thing in all unis??
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Linda
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I'm studying philosophy (and took up a £40k loan in order to do so, as I am Norwegian). I have 5 contingency plans.

1) Get a PhD, become a professor/writer, have a relatively good life but struggle with payign my loan back.

2) Take a few years off after I finish my BA to work as a travel tour guide thingie for something like the Imaginative traveller, pay back parts of my loan and learn lots of languages while getting paid to backpack through countries I always wanted to visit anyways, then join Georgetown School of Foregin Service and become a diplomat or work for a think tank somewhere.

3) go back to Norway and study physics for free so I can get a real job. (uni in Norway is free)

4) go to Harvard Law school, become a lawyer and earn **** loads of money so I can pay back my loan (but secretly wishing I could be a philosophy professor instead).

5) Give up and accept that eventually I will become a computer programmer like everyone else anyhow.
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shiny
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(Original post by Linda)
1) Get a PhD, become a professor/writer, have a relatively good life but struggle with payign my loan back.
If only it were that easy ...
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Linda
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(Original post by shiny)
If only it were that easy ...
yes I know, which is why #5 will eventually happen.
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milady
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(Original post by distortedgav)
I guess the subject of this thread pretty much sums up what I want to know. I'd quite like to study Philosophy at University, but I want to know what I could do with it. I'd probably combine it with either Mathematics or Physics.
Don't do it! Don't do it! :eek:

Or, if you're really, desperately, dying to do it, then definitely combine it with Maths or Physics.

There really aren't any careers for a pure philosophy degree, unless you want to be a university lecturer, teacher, etc, which is very hard. I know they may say it (philosophy) teaches you how to 'think' or whatever, but a maths or science degree will do the same, and give you a valuable knowledge/skills base, which people will pay you for when they employ you.

Um, I'm nowhere near university age or whatever, but I'm saying this because I know a guy who did philosophy. He wasn't a slacker or anything, got jobs and worked hard to pay his fees, and so forth. But after he finished he was in serious trouble, because he was completely unemployable. He was even considering staying on working at the part-time job he had, which I think, was unpacking boxes or something.

In the end, he decided to go back to uni and do a science degree. What a waste of time and money.

But if you have looked into it, and you're really interested and so on, go ahead and do it. But please combine it with maths or whatever as back-up.
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by milady)
Don't do it! Don't do it! :eek:

Or, if you're really, desperately, dying to do it, then definitely combine it with Maths or Physics.

There really aren't any careers for a pure philosophy degree, unless you want to be a university lecturer, teacher, etc, which is very hard. I know they may say it (philosophy) teaches you how to 'think' or whatever, but a maths or science degree will do the same, and give you a valuable knowledge/skills base, which people will pay you for when they employ you.

Um, I'm nowhere near university age or whatever, but I'm saying this because I know a guy who did philosophy. He wasn't a slacker or anything, got jobs and worked hard to pay his fees, and so forth. But after he finished he was in serious trouble, because he was completely unemployable. He was even considering staying on working at the part-time job he had, which I think, was unpacking boxes or something.

In the end, he decided to go back to uni and do a science degree. What a waste of time and money.

But if you have looked into it, and you're really interested and so on, go ahead and do it. But please combine it with maths or whatever as back-up.
I think that's a bit OTT. A good degree helps regardless of subject.

My advice is do physics and philosophy as they complement each other so well, my only concern is that you will struggle to do enough physics to be called a physicist. I had a discussion with my supervisor a yesterday and it seems that there is a definate move to include philosophy teaching into pure science degrees, which is excellent, after all scientists are philosophers too.
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Mishael
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(Original post by milady)
Don't do it! Don't do it! :eek:

Or, if you're really, desperately, dying to do it, then definitely combine it with Maths or Physics.

There really aren't any careers for a pure philosophy degree, unless you want to be a university lecturer, teacher, etc, which is very hard. I know they may say it (philosophy) teaches you how to 'think' or whatever, but a maths or science degree will do the same, and give you a valuable knowledge/skills base, which people will pay you for when they employ you.

Um, I'm nowhere near university age or whatever, but I'm saying this because I know a guy who did philosophy. He wasn't a slacker or anything, got jobs and worked hard to pay his fees, and so forth. But after he finished he was in serious trouble, because he was completely unemployable. He was even considering staying on working at the part-time job he had, which I think, was unpacking boxes or something.

In the end, he decided to go back to uni and do a science degree. What a waste of time and money.

But if you have looked into it, and you're really interested and so on, go ahead and do it. But please combine it with maths or whatever as back-up.
'There really aren't any careers for a pure philosophy degree' my bum. Philosophy, like English or History, opens doors to many different fields. However, what is very very necessary in any degree like this is relevant experience, which is probably where your friend had problems.

I don't expect to be simply walk into a job when I graduate, and I'm perfectly prepared to work for nothing to get the experience I need. Don't try and put people off studying an extremely interesting and rewarding subject with scare stories like this - people just have to be realistic and put that extra effort in to get experience.

Besides, university is about studying a subject you find fascinating for its own sake surely? When did it become nothing more than a passport to a highly paid job?
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tritogeneia1
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
I think that's a bit OTT. A good degree helps regardless of subject.

My advice is do physics and philosophy as they complement each other so well, my only concern is that you will struggle to do enough physics to be called a physicist. I had a discussion with my supervisor a yesterday and it seems that there is a definate move to include philosophy teaching into pure science degrees, which is excellent, after all scientists are philosophers too.
Not that I'm an expert, but think if you do philosophy and physics you concentrate on theoretical physics, cosmology et al, so you would still be a physicist but in a specific area. It's a very well-regarded degree actually, quite possibly because it's incredibly hard, so if you can get in for it and stick the course then you'll have a very good degree which will probably make you highly employable for many jobs! I know someone here at Oxford who's doing it, I don't know that she necessarily wants to be a physicist afterwards, but I should think she'll be able to take her pick of a lot of jobs!
As for straight philosophy and what you can do with it - transferable skills. As a classicist I hear the whole 'What can you do with that? What a pointless degree' argument far too often and I am so very fed up with it! Jobs and careers can't be compartmentalised easily, there are plenty of interesting jobs out there which have no specific training path or narrow requirements, so just go with your gut feeling and pick something you like! Life is too short to waste money and time on something you hate, especially when it probably won't give you any more of an advantage than something you like.
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ianc
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You Could enter a graduate training scheme and become a middle manager.
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Lush Law
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#13
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A degree in philosophy challenges you to tackle questions about validity, intelligibility, plausibility and truth. It's a rigorous degree that trains the mind into a very conceptual and logical way of thinking. The skills obtained from such a degree are transferrable to a lot of careers that require a good logical mind. People tend to make the assumption that Philosophy is pointless and is a wasted degree because it's conceptual and can't be proven. In terms of employment, it's better than a lot of BA degrees I'd say - it shows you think in an interesting and lateral way and have gone onto uni to study something most probably that you have leel experience of.
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